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Wow, LUAP, the potato link is very interesting. When I got sick from touching peppers (was helping a friend who was making salsa - I washed the cutting board under hot soapy water, then wiped my face with my clean hand. My face started to burn from residual pepper juice which I didn't worry about. The next day I was sick with the major headache and stomach symptoms) I called a friend I had worked with at a biology software company, we made software for high school students to learn about biological processes. He said that there was something in peppers, etc, that was a neurotoxin and could conceivably spread through my blood stream and cause the reaction. I was really surprised by this and that was when I called an allergist, who said call a gastroenterologist. The gastro said call the allergist. So I called poison control instead and got a story somewhat like what you posed on that first link.

I think it has something to do with the liver not being able to break down the toxic qualities of the alkaloids in the nightshade family fast enough to not allow the body to have a reaction. If too much of this alkaloid will make anyone sick (as mentioned in that link) then if a standard amount makes some people as sick, there must be something to the metabolism of it. Since it does not appear to be an allergy - IE no typical allergic reaction symptoms, then it makes me believe it is a weakness in the liver.

The poison control center person I talked with said it is a toxic reaction - then he said he had a hard time believing that anyone could get sick from a potato. He said the skin of a green potato or the eyes is the worst, also leaves from the plant and green tomatoes. That surprised me because many people eat fried green potatoes.

I know that I have read the alkaloid starts to break down at temperatures over 450 degrees F, and have unscientifically justified my occasional french fry ingestion with that knowledge. Also, heat alone doesn't do it, must have hot oil involved, hence my french fry theory. I use to be able to eat as many as 10 fries, then I cut it to 5. I then found if I ate 5 fries two days in a row I would get sick - the half life for the alkaloid, or processing the nightshade food, is 36 hours. That would mean eating two days in a row is nearly like having that much in one setting. Before reading that I had found that if I skipped two days in between eating 5 fries, I was ok.

Yep, I am my best guinea pig. One of the times I got the sickest was when I went to a Chinese restaurant and had some soup. In the broth, surprisngly, were chunks of fresh tomato (didn't look like they'd cooked in very long). Instead of returning the soup, I thought if I pulled the chunks out, I would be ok. Within 2 hours of eating that soup I started getting sick, had to go home from work and was home two days. This was before I really realized to what extent this group of foods made me sick. That was when I started getting really careful.

Anyway, it would be great if I could find something that helped prevent this from happening, but honestly at this point, I almost never encounter these foods, or at least never really crave them. Probably lack some enzyme - something that doesn't show up on liver tests (mine always looks great on those metabolic panels).

Stephanie

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Hi, very intresting thread!

Im from Sweden and have found out that Im getting really sick from potatoes. Ive realized Im intolerant to "Nightshades". My doctor knows really nothing about this, so I have to figure this one out for myself.

Ive read alot and think Ive got a clear picture, its getting clearer anyhow. :)

But I still wonder if ordinary White- and blackpepper, the one you sprinkle on your food is a nightshade?

Do anyone have any good links for me about nightshade-intolerans!

whitepepper.jpg

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Hi everyone! New here, and surprised to find others who can't eat nightshades, though really it is no mystery that they would make folks sick, since they are poison. I had eliminated virutally everything from my diet and was still having intestinal problems; then hit on potatoes. I should've known since I have not been able to eat cooked tomatoes without throwing up since I was a kid (always sick after spaghetti and pizza).

It sure is hard getting gluten free waffles and the like, since many of them are made with potato starch.

As to the spice pepper, it comes from the Piper nigrum plant, and is a seed. It is not a nightshade. Black pepper is harvested when the seeds/berries are half ripe, then they are let to dry. Green pepper corns are picked early, and white peppercorns are picked when fully ripe, then soaked in brine to get off the shell and release the white pepper. Interestingly, pepper sends a message from the mouth to the tummy telling it to start churning up some juices because it's about to get food. It is an appetite stimulant in that way. It also, apparently, hides the lack of freshnes of food, and was therefore highly valued in the Middle Ages when food might be scarce now and again.

Tobacco, though, is a nightshade.

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Thanks for the info. Stephanie. I did read your past posts on this topic. It is just such a strange thing to have. I'm afraid that my doctor will think I am crazy if I mention it. I wonder how common this is and if there is any current research being done on it.

It is very common -- Has anyone here read "DANGEROUS GRAINS" ??? You must read it. The author goes ito these secondary food intolerance/allergies. He says we all will end up with them, it seems its a matter of time. We must rotate the good foods so we don't have the same things happen to them.

The poison control center person I talked with said it is a toxic reaction - then he said he had a hard time believing that anyone could get sick from a potato. He said the skin of a green potato or the eyes is the worst, also leaves from the plant and green tomatoes. That surprised me because many people eat fried green potatoes.

I called poision control on another issue (celiac disease) a few months back and they don't have a clue. As many are, answering the phone to collect a pay check and is careless of what we are experience. I was fearful when I called they might have 'out sourced' and I would end up speaking to someone in INDIA. But the person spoke english but was clueless about celiac disease. It really made me think, who really cares?

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I read the posts about nightshade with great intrest. About two year ago I started getting a skin rash on my neck when eating tomatoes which progressed into rash + irritated throat to restricted breathing and now to wheezing. I also started reacting to cayenne pepper, chillies, and papreeka (which is in everything). Though, unlike the other posts I can eat potatos with no problems. It takes me 3-4 days before I am well again after eating the nightshade, and because of the breathing problems I've gone to urgent care. The allergist told me that it was a food intolerance, but probably wasn't totally convinced because he said that I should still go to the emergency room in case it was anaphylaxis. It was through this whole process that I determined that I have problems with gluten. The allergist asked me if I had heartburn. I said yes and followed his advise to take prylosec and quit caffeine. It didn't help and I noticed that my upset stomach and reflux often occurred after eating bread. So I went without for a week and all my stomach problems went away. However I am still growing increasingly sensitive to nightshades (except potato).

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I have been gluten-free since June and I just figured out that potatoes are making me very sick. Does anyone know why we get other food intolerances after going gluten-free? Also, can some people eat other members of the nightshade family? I have been too scared to eat tomatoes, peppers, etc. because the potato reaction is very painful and lasts a long time.

Potatoes are poisonous, as are all nightshades, but most people tolerate them. I think that when our health is compromised we are just that much more sensitive.

Wow, I'm always excited to see someone mention this because I don't know anyone with this problem, except me. I can't eat any nightshades and have been off of them for 6 years. I used to get so sick from eating rattatouie (tomatoes, peppers and eggplant) that it was unreal. I don't get sick right away, usually, but have within two hours. Usually it's more like 12 hours and very painful in my stomach/gut and have migraines. Lasts a couple of days.

I have done research and found it seems to be a toxic reaction, not an allergy, at least in my case. The symptoms are very much like the food poisoning people get after eating potatoes with green skin on them. The active ingredient that seems to be the culprit is solanine. But I'm not certain it's the only problem alkaloid in these foods.

I figured this out for me before finding out about gluten and the symptoms for me are similar. I cannot tolerate even small amounts, like paprika on deviled eggs. I have gotten sick from smelling peppers cooking. I have also gotten sick after touching a cutting board with pepper juice on it (from a friend who was cutting them up for a party) - I washed it in hot soapy water and then made the mistake of wiping my face with my newly-washed hand, which made my skin burn and then made me sick for two days.

Best I can tell, some people don't make the enzymes to break down these alkaloids which in turn cause a poisonous or toxic reaction. This has not gotten any better for me since going gluten free, either.

It's a bummer because so many gluten free baking products contain potato... Sigh.

Anyway, you're not alone or crazy to have these reactions. I have since found that kava kava is a nightshade - would give me headaches every time I took it, finally looked it up and yep, a nightshade. Also noticed I can instinctively spot nightshade family plants out in the open and fear them, like Jimson Weed and even Petunia! And tomatillos are also nightshade.

Here's an interesting link about nightshade-free food products in the UK:

Nomato

Article about nightshades

Also a good page about nightshade intolerance, though it focuses on arthritis:

From Allergy Magazine

Hope some of this is helpful to you...

Stephanie

Very helpful to me too, thanks.

One more thought - a decent coping strategy I have discovered is as soon as I eat something with nightshades in it, if I figure it out (usually pretty obvious) I take 8-10 activated charcoal tablets and drink lots of water. My doctor suggested this and it does seem to help. Still get sick sometimes but not as bad as I have.

Great suggestion, thanks.

Hello, i don't have a nightshade intolerance, i tried a food elim test on that - this is fortunate as I only eat Thai food when I am with my wife - the other common food we used to enjoy was italian but thats got thrown out the window now... I tolerate the red hot chillis.

However from hanging out on another message board, I have noticed that many of the things that bother children with autism also bother the gluten intolerant. On this board there seems to be problems with nightshades, however the autism experts talk about "phenols" and "amines" instead. Nightshades are hi in phenols, so just a thought - maybe the nightshade intolerance is a phenol intolerance? There is info on what foods are hi in phenols and amines on the net, so you can search on that. I take an enzyme supplement called "No Phenol" by Houston enzymes for other reasons (good at breaking down plant fiber and yeast) - this product is designed for the phenol intolerant.

Good information.

I had an interesting experience with potatoes not long ago. I've always loved them but even so there was a slight taste to them I didn't like, after not eating any nightshades for 4 months I tasted a piece of potato and it tasted awful to me. It really made me wonder if our taste buds are our first line of defence and that because as infants and small children we are made to eat things we don't want to we lose the ability to know what is good for us.

Tonight I was talking with a friend who has a small daughter with excema (spelling?) and this child's father has major gluten issues. I had noticed that she avoided the sandwiches at a lunch and my friend was saying that if she has a hamburger she throws the bun away. It seems to me that this child knows gluten is not good for her even though she is only two years old. I also watched her grandmother try to feed her a sandwhich and after resisting for a while, naturally she wanted to please her grandmother and she ate a little. :(

My sister has a nightshade intolerance - I think I have a problem with potatoes but refuse to acknowledge right now because my diet is already so limited I hate to cut those out too - yet.

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Another connection with nightshades and celiac: nightshades have lectins, which is the cause for problems for many people. Wheat, rye, barley, and oats also have lectins. It doesn't surprise me that nightshades bother me as I research.

I am reading a book called: Allergy Free by Konrad Kail N.D. It says: Most lectins come from the indigestible fractions of plant products, often deriving from beans, grains, soy, and wheat. In particular, soybean and wheat lectins can produce an increase in permeability in the cells they bind to, often leading to cell death. Lectins can also cause the intestinal villi to atrophy, as well as other degenerative changes. (By the way, gluten is a lectin!) This doctor also believes Dr. D'Adamo is correct in many of the blood type foods he feels are harmful. Blood type A and B should both avoid tomatoes--however, type O and AB can usually tolerate tomatoes.

Gluten being a lectin does make it much easier for me to understand why nightshades effect me so badly. I guess it all is determined by how sensitive a person is to lectins. Potatoes upset my tummy within hours and they cause constipation, tomatoes, on the other hand, cause tummy upset in a short time and then terrible diarrhea.

At this time, I find I can't have gluten, of course, soy, corn, rice, nightshades, red meat, and many vegetables. Strange though, I can eat my ricecakes still and I can eat Lays Potato Chips without problems. Ann Lee, a celiac nutritionist told me they find this happens sometimes and they do not understand why either.

This last weekend I was back in Michigan for a wedding. On Sunday, my mom made potato salad and I had told her I can't eat potatoes anymore, let alone, I can't have the salad dressing they use. Anyways, when she was done making the salad, she tells me she left me a bowl of plain potatoes, so I could have them. I repeated that I CAN NOT eat potatoes and she said, "Now Deb, there is nothing wrong with potatoes and you have got to eat something!" I had to walk outside and regain my composure--then I explained to her about nightshades. Later, my brother showed up, which surprised me. My mom must have told him I will not eat potatoes and after not seeing or speaking to my brother for 2 1/2 years, the only think he said to me was, "Hey, I have something for you out in my truck" he then snickered and said, "It's a 50# sack of potatoes!" AND, that was the only thing he said to me, except for, I said, "I bet you have a big pot of barley soup for me too, don't ya?" To which he replied, "There is nothing wrong with barley soup, it's the best thing for ya, look at me, I ain't losing any weight!" I was very hurt, to say the least. My family does not need to understand why I can't have certain things, but they should treat me with the same respect they want from me. Not for one minute should anyone tell me to give them a break, that they just do not understand celiac. My father and my sister are both celiacs and this is a very educated family, celiac wise, except, of course, for my brother. Had my mom not said anything about potatoes though, he would not have made that remark.

I hate that you all have these intolerances too, yet as you all say--it is nice to have others totally understand how you feel.

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Yes Yes Yes!! Took me forever to figure this one out though. I thought it was the milk if I had mashed potatoes, then I thought it must be the butter if I had baked potatoes, then I thought maybe it was something in the Combo of the Starch and Protein together issue (the Macrobiotic method of eating says this is a big No No), finally after being diagnosed with Celiac disease 3 months ago and being Totally Gluten-Free (to my knowledge anyway), I was Still having Horrid pains in my stomach, but I noticed this only happened with a meal that contained Potatoes or anything with Tomato base...sauces or whatever. I made a mock Spanish Rice meal one night that tasted soooo good going down with ground turkey and a tomato based sauce that all gluten free and fresh ingredients etc., I had the Worst Reaction I've had in ages from that and was 3 days getting over it and then had Acid Reflux for a week after that.

So, I guess I they aren't called the "deadly nightshades" for nothing...that night I thought I was dying. Yeowwwy!

So now I have scratched potatoes and tomatoes off my list...two of absolute favorite veggies in the world. Just my luck.

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Hi, I am a new member and am replying because I suffer the same problem with nightshade foods. I cannot eat chilli or capsicum without suffering migraine that lasts for two or three days and is not relieved by normal medication. I cannot even use the same chopping board without scouring it well first. Even cafes, chopping veggies with the same knife, gives me the symptoms. Picking the offending food out of a salad makes no difference. I cannot eat tomato sauces of any kind and now are realising that potatoes may have been causing my digestive problems.

For over five years now I have suffred from chronic diarrhea, on and off. Could not figure it out. I am now going through an allergy clinic and they say I have the gene for celiac disease. Gluten free foods sometime relieved my symptoms but also sometimes made them worse. I now think that it is the potato starch in some gluten free foods that does it to me.

The allergy clinic says that all nightshade foods are high in chemicals such as salicylates, but the symptoms of salicylate intolerance are not the same as those I have. Pain racks my body at night but is relieved when I get up in the morning and move around.

The potato poisoning makes sense to me as I often hear my gut rumbling loudly after a meal with potato in it.

I am now wheat free as it causes sneezing, runny nose and general conjestion with me. I haven't tryed rye and wonder if I am gluten intolerant or maybe my gut is so inflammed by the potato it is reacting to everything. I test negative to gliadin, but then I was off wheat when I had the test done so it may be a false negative.

Are you any better on your current diet?

rgds Margaret

Wow, I'm always excited to see someone mention this because I don't know anyone with this problem, except me. I can't eat any nightshades and have been off of them for 6 years. I used to get so sick from eating rattatouie (tomatoes, peppers and eggplant) that it was unreal. I don't get sick right away, usually, but have within two hours. Usually it's more like 12 hours and very painful in my stomach/gut and have migraines. Lasts a couple of days.

I have done research and found it seems to be a toxic reaction, not an allergy, at least in my case. The symptoms are very much like the food poisoning people get after eating potatoes with green skin on them. The active ingredient that seems to be the culprit is solanine. But I'm not certain it's the only problem alkaloid in these foods.

I figured this out for me before finding out about gluten and the symptoms for me are similar. I cannot tolerate even small amounts, like paprika on deviled eggs. I have gotten sick from smelling peppers cooking. I have also gotten sick after touching a cutting board with pepper juice on it (from a friend who was cutting them up for a party) - I washed it in hot soapy water and then made the mistake of wiping my face with my newly-washed hand, which made my skin burn and then made me sick for two days.

Best I can tell, some people don't make the enzymes to break down these alkaloids which in turn cause a poisonous or toxic reaction. This has not gotten any better for me since going gluten free, either.

It's a bummer because so many gluten free baking products contain potato... Sigh.

Anyway, you're not alone or crazy to have these reactions. I have since found that kava kava is a nightshade - would give me headaches every time I took it, finally looked it up and yep, a nightshade. Also noticed I can instinctively spot nightshade family plants out in the open and fear them, like Jimson Weed and even Petunia! And tomatillos are also nightshade.

Here's an interesting link about nightshade-free food products in the UK:

Nomato

Article about nightshades

Also a good page about nightshade intolerance, though it focuses on arthritis:

From Allergy Magazine

Hope some of this is helpful to you...

Stephanie

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i realise this is a really old thread,
 
but ive found it extremely helpfull- all my old joint pain was back this morning after feeling a bit achy. even the staggering around in the morning feelin like my feet are swollen on the soles and makin it hard to walk.
ive just realised that the gluten free bread and pittas ive been eating all contain potato /starch. some things even had milk powder etc. just goes to show you must read and reread ALL ingredient lists.

anyway thought some of the newer members might be interested if suffering from joint pains ect and ive got a fab new recipe for homemade nomato sauce and one for making baked beans - so missing my baked beans lol

also found some granola bar, shortbread and flat bread recipes on google.

i go shopping on mondays so it looks like i,ll be doing my best attempt to try to make it look like i can actually cook and enjoy it !!

i am actually a bit excited by the thought- weird.... 

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i realise this is a really old thread,

 

but ive found it extremely helpfull- all my old joint pain was back this morning after feeling a bit achy. even the staggering around in the morning feelin like my feet are swollen on the soles and makin it hard to walk.

ive just realised that the gluten free bread and pittas ive been eating all contain potato /starch. some things even had milk powder etc. just goes to show you must read and reread ALL ingredient lists.

anyway thought some of the newer members might be interested if suffering from joint pains ect and ive got a fab new recipe for homemade nomato sauce and one for making baked beans - so missing my baked beans lol

also found some granola bar, shortbread and flat bread recipes on google.

i go shopping on mondays so it looks like i,ll be doing my best attempt to try to make it look like i can actually cook and enjoy it !!

i am actually a bit excited by the thought- weird.... 

Thanks for resurrecting this! I was trying to make my own 'nomato' sauce using carrots as a base and look forward to trying the one in the post before yours.

I get extreme nausea minutes after eating nightshades (potatoes are worst), then my head spins and I have to lay down, it lasts about an hour, and at some point within that hour I usually have to vomit. Then I have random sharp, stabbing, pains in my joint, especially fingers and wrists......but can be anywhere.

When I first went gluten free, I just removed gluten from the house (and didn't buy anything to substitute) but when Christmas approached, I bought lots of gluten-free stuff.....boy was I ill! It didn't take long to work out that no gluten-free processed products was the way to go for me, it's a shame I had to hit my head against a wall a few times before I would accept it though, lol.

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hi greebo,

 

im also realising its not gonna be easy and if i have to become a cooking expert to make it a little bit easier then thats the way its got to be :( the excitement i was feeling over the baked bean recipe has erm gone lol

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hi greebo,

 

im also realising its not gonna be easy and if i have to become a cooking expert to make it a little bit easier then thats the way its got to be :( the excitement i was feeling over the baked bean recipe has erm gone lol

Oh no, but 'baked' beans used to be one of my favourites to cook in a big batch and keep in the fridge, and I think you should try it, it's not hard, and very cheap. That is, unless you have found out you can't do beans! (Like me....).

I'm gonna make the nomato sauce to put on the mountains of 'pasta' I'm going to make with my new kitchen gadget (spiraliser), but I'm waiting for delivery, so in the ,meantime I'll make carrot and zucchini ribbons (just using the veg peeler), with the sauce, and beef meatballs- yum!

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Whats in a nomato sauce? I have quite the allergy to tomatos so i can't have them. I also tend to stay away from other nightshades.

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Whats in a nomato sauce? I have quite the allergy to tomatos so i can't have them. I also tend to stay away from other nightshades.

Mainly carrots......I got the link from a couple of posts above in this thread:

http://www.craigsams.com/pages/nomato.html

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    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/14/2018 - If you’re looking for a simple, nutritious and exciting alternative to standard spaghetti and tomato sauce, look no further than this delicious version that blends ripe plum tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, basil, and firm sliced ricotta to deliver a tasty, memorable dish.
    Ingredients:
    12 ounces gluten-free spaghetti 5 or 6 ripe plum tomatoes ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, crushed ¾ teaspoons crushed red pepper ¼ cup chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Kosher salt and black pepper ⅓ cup pecorino Romano cheese, grated ½ cup firm ricotta, shaved with peeler Directions:
    Finely chop all but one of the tomatoes; transfer to large bowl with olive oil and ¼ teaspoon salt.
    Cook spaghetti until al dente or desired firmness, and drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking water. 
    Meanwhile, chop remaining tomato, and place in food processor along with garlic, red pepper, and ½ teaspoon salt; puree until smooth. 
    Gently stir mixture into the bowl of chopped tomatoes.
    Add cooked spaghetti, basil and parsley to a large bowl.
    Toss in tomato mixture, adding some reserved pasta water, if needed. 
    Spoon pasta into bowls and top with Romano cheese, as desired.