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Lisa

Flattening Of The Villi

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Just curious. Are there any other medical reasons for the flattening of the villi and small intestinal inflamation other than food intolerances?

ie. stress, bacteria, parasites

Any one have any thoughts about this.

Lisa B.

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My GI said that it could be a number of problems, but as it turned out, we didn't explore any of the other options so I'm not too clear on what they may be. I think bacterial overgrowth can cause damage, and certainly other GI problems like UC, Crohn's, etc.

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I was under the impression that only celiac disease caused flattening, or destruction, of the villi. A lot of things can cause inflammatory processes, but it is the villi flattening that is the classic hallmark of celiac disease, and can only been seen on biopsy. My GI told me right after my scope my gut looked like celiac disease, but it was the pathology that really confirmed it.

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I was under the impression that only celiac disease caused flattening, or destruction, of the villi.  A lot of things can cause inflammatory processes, but it is the villi flattening that is the classic hallmark of celiac disease, and can only been seen on biopsy.  My GI told me right after my scope my gut looked like celiac disease, but it was the pathology that really confirmed it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I have been thinking about this for a while. He said that flattening of the villi is the classic hallmark of celiac disease? That is very interesting!!!! I have had the biopsy and flattening and scalloping of the walls was indicated and biopsy confirmed celiac disease.

I was curious about research being done that would cause the same effects on the small intestines without being a gluten/wheat intolerence. You would seem to think that there may be other things that can cause the same damage, not exclusively celiac disease.

That's cool, I'm glad that you told me that, I did not know. Thanks

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I have been thinking about this for a while.  He said that flattening of the villi is the classic hallmark of celiac disease?  That is very interesting!!!!  I have had the biopsy and flattening and scalloping of the walls was indicated and biopsy confirmed celiac disease.

I was curious about research being done that would cause the same effects  on the small intestines without being a gluten/wheat intolerence.  You would seem to think that there may be other things that can cause the same damage, not exclusively celiac disease.

That's cool, I'm glad that you told me that, I did not know.  Thanks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I also had scalloping of the duodenum, and my biopsy showed complete villious atrophy. It is similar to how the anti-endomysial antibodies are so specific for celiac disease, I asked my dr if anything else could cause that, and she told me no, that it was really only celiac disease that affected the villi like that. Actually, I'm not sure a wheat intolerance causes flattening either, but you'd have to do a lit search for that one. I think that is likely why there are a lot of people with wheat intolerances, or even wheat allergies, who have normal biopsies. It doesn't mean wheat doesn't bother them, but it does mean they don't have the autoimmune disease that celiac disease is.

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Just curious. Are there any other medical reasons for the flattening of the villi and small intestinal inflamation other than food intolerances?

ie. stress, bacteria, parasites

A certain kind of genetically modified potato caused intestinal damage in rats. I believe those potatoes are not on the market ;)

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Guest BellyTimber

Piggybacking on Lisa's question rather, a company in the UK has launched a capsule containing:

Gluten Protease 100mg

Cellulase 25mg

Amylase 10mg

Lactobacillus acidophilus 10mg

Non-active ingredients:

Vegetable Magnesium Stearate Capsule

Cellulose & Water

What would it be for, in celiac disease and similar illnesses is there a digestive element as well as an immune one?

Thanks,

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Guest BellyTimber

Apologies !!!!!

:unsure:

I should have done what the preamble above always says, search ... celiac3270 posted this in December and there has also been considerable discussion of surrounding issues and useful further links.

Shall re-post my query in a different form when I have "digested" that.

:o

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I was under the impression that only celiac disease caused flattening, or destruction, of the villi.  A lot of things can cause inflammatory processes, but it is the villi flattening that is the classic hallmark of celiac disease, and can only been seen on biopsy.  My GI told me right after my scope my gut looked like celiac disease, but it was the pathology that really confirmed it.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The villi flattening and subsequent leaky gut can be caused by reactive foods. I have Type II, Delayed Food reactions to a broad range of reactive foods. I was given L-glutamine to heal the intestinal lining damage caused by these food reactions. I may or may not have celiac disease, Not yet determined. Claire

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Readers here may find this interesting:

The Causes

The leaky gut syndrome is basically caused by inflammation of the gut lining. This inflammation is usually brought about by the following:

· Antibiotics because they lead to the overgrowth of abnormal flora in the gastrointestinal tract (bacteria, parasites, candida, fungi) · Alcohol and caffeine (strong gut irritants)

· Foods and beverages contaminated by parasites like giardia lamblia, cryptosporidium, blastocystis hominis and others

· Foods and beverages contaminated by bacteria like helicobacter pylori, klebsiella,

· citrobacter, pseudomonas and others

· Chemicals in fermented and processed food (dyes, preservatives, peroxidized fats) · Enzyme deficiencies (e.g. celiac disease, lactase deficiency causing lactose intolerance)

· NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ASA, ibuprofen, indomethacin,

· Prescription corticosteroids (e.g. prednisone)

· High refined carbohydrate diet (e.g. candy bars, cookies, cake, soft drinks, white

· bread) Prescription hormones like the birth control pill Mold and fungal mycotoxins in stored grains, fruit and refined carbohydrates.

The leaky gut syndrome can cause the malabsorption of many important micronutrients. The inflammatory process causes swelling (edema) and the presence of many noxious chemicals all of which can block the absorption of vitamins and essential amino acids. A leaky gut does not absorb nutrients properly. Bloating, gas and cramps occur as do a long list of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Eventually, systemic complaints like fatigue, headaches, memory loss, poor concentration or irritability develop.

Prescription broad spectrum antibiotics, especially when taken for extended periods of time, wipe out all the gut friendly bacteria that provide protection against fungi and amoebic (parasitic) infections, help the body break down complex foods and synthesize vitamins like B12 and biotin. Since this friendly bowel flora is killed off, the body now has no local defence against the parasites or fungi that are normally held in check. This then causes an inflammatory reaction leading to the leaky gut syndrome. Food allergies quickly develop and these may trigger the signs and symptoms of arthritis, eczema, migraines, asthma or other forms of immune dysfunction. Other common symptoms of this bowel flora imbalance and leaky gut syndrome are bloating and gas after meals and alternating constipation with diarrhea. This set of symptoms is usually labelled as IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or spastic bowel disease and treated symptomatically by general practitioners and gastroenterologists with antispasmodic drugs, tranquilizers or different types of soluble (psyllium) and insoluble (bran) fiber.

http://www.afpafitness.com/articles/LEAKGUT4.HTM

As you can read above - this sounds eerily like celiac disease. I am certain that many people who are diangosed with this disorder (always subsequent to the type II, Delayed Food Reaction diagnosis)

actually have Celiac - not all of course. I may or may not be one of those. My DFR diagnosie is 15 years old. I now have a neurological disorder suggesting possible celiac/gluten ataxia. This is yet to be determinded.

The important thing here - lots of stuff is doing intestinal damage and setting off autoimmune disorders. Celiac does not stand alone in that regard. Claire

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Claire,

Thanks for all the information. You certainly have done your research.

Before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, I had several instances where I thought I had food poisoning (which I really did!) because my reaction was that I had horrible vomiting and diarhhea. Once the food was gone from my system, I seemed to get better. (And again, little did I know, the saltines I was eating because I was quezy were actually hurting me).

My doctor thought once that it was a reaction to an antibiotic that had killed the good bacteria. I took acidophillus (sorry about the spelling) and I got better.

Finally, I had many recurring bouts of vomiting and diarhhea that would not go away. That's when I finally got sent to a GI that diagnosed celiac disease with a biopsy. I was under the impression that only celiac disease would cause flattened villa. Since I have been on a gluten-free diet, I feel 1000% better and the old systoms have not returned. I am wondering, has anyone had a follow-up biopsy to see if their villa have unflattened themselves?

sonja

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Thanks for all the information. It all sound so technical to me. You all have way advanced me.

Have a question....What is Gluten Ataxia? I have heard that come up no and again, but don't know what it is

Thanks again for your impute.

Lisa B.

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Thanks for all the information.  It all sound so technical to me.  You all have way advanced me.

Have a question....What is Gluten Ataxia?  I have heard that come up no and again, but don't know what it is

Thanks again for your impute.

Lisa B.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Found it on the current site, thanks.

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