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WinterSong

Great Way To Cook A Turkey - No Cc!

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Hi everyone!

 

Since the holidays are around the corner, I wanted to share my favorite holiday turkey tip to prevent CC.

 

Two years ago I discovered a brilliant invention called oven bags.

 

Clean and season your gluten free turkey, seal it in the bag, place it on a pan (I like using disposable aluminum pans in case the bag breaks), and stick it in the oven. There is no basting involved because the bag makes it cook in its own juices! This is great if you are you going to someone else's house because you can ask the host to make sure that the turkey is gluten-free, use naturally gluten-free spices, ask that they do not stuff the turkey (isn't that a health risk now anyway?), and you don't have to worry about CC from their turkey baster (I've heard of many gluten-free turkeys being ruined that way). These bags are cheap, provide an easy clean up afterwards, and I've found it makes cooking dinner easier. BEST turkey I've ever eaten I made using an oven bag. 

 

If your host did not get a gluten-free turkey or you still feel worried, you could also buy turkey breast cutlets and bake it in the oven with parchment paper. I've done that and made my own stuffing.

 

No need to feel left out of the main course  :)

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That is how my mom always made turkey and it comes out great!

 

Seems like I remember that you have to flour the turkey or the bag?  Or are new bags not like that?  IF so, what did you use for the flour?  I did it a few  years ago and I think I used white rice flour.  But I'm not certain.

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I use the oven bags for roasts too.  you can throw all the cut up veggies in the bag with the roast.  Comes out full of yumminess.

 

Colleen

 

Oh no.  I've never dusted any thing with flour.  Sheesh, is there nothing I can't screw up with cooking? :o

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Brining turkey first is my preference for absolutely succulent, moist and flavorful results. Then I season and place fresh herbs under the skin. But we all have our own little secrets, don't we? :-D

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Brining turkey first is my preference for absolutely succulent, moist and flavorful results. Then I season and place fresh herbs under the skin. But we all have our own little secrets, don't we? :-D

Sheesh Love2,

 

Your seriously killin me here :blink:

 

Colleen :D

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Sheesh Love2,

 

Your seriously killin me here :blink:

 

Colleen :D

I hope not! We need you. :-)

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I agree about the brining (and do it too), but the oven bag is a fabulous idea for cooking a turkey or roast at someone else's house!  I'm going to do this at Christmas when I'm at my Mom's (was planning on putting her oven through the cleaning cycle on the first day of my arrival!)  

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I'm an either or sort of person depending on small a turkey I could find. If I forget to shop early enough I sometimes can't find one small enough to brine, which makes me sad. :( But if I do get one that is too big to fit in a pan all the way with a lid to cover with liquid, I usually do an injection concoction and a bag. I used rice flour last year, and for roasts when I use bags for those. There was a year I found a recipe that had sliced oranges and herbed butters rubbed under the skin. We did that after we brined it, it was delicious. I have a very nice lidded roasting pan that will fit most turkeys, I've only had one that the lid wouldn't quite close with itself but that's what I get for shopping late and getting stuck with a 25 pound stupid bird. <_< Mostly I'm a fan of the bag because then I don't have to scrub the pan. :P

 

I only do this once a year though. I grew up with ham for Christmas so ham it is. I couldn't possibly have anything else and be satisfied. Besides, my husband and I aren't huge turkey fans. Once a year is enough for both of us.

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I will be doing a brine for my first every turkey this year! I am doing a test turkey to make sure I don't completely botch it because I am hosting a Friendsgiving and I've never cooked for a big gathering of people before... should be interesting!

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I really like the oven bag idea to avoid CC.  Its like a "keep your hands off" barrier, lol.

 

In my opinion, the most important thing about cooking the turkey is temperature.  During my childhood the turkey would be cooked for like 10 hours, and it was like eating shredded cotton.  Cook your bird to minimum 165 degrees Fahrenheit, invest in a cheap remote oven thermometer that you leave in the bird and the display is out of the oven.  That way you A. Cook it completely and B. Don't cook the crap out of it wondering if it is done, taking it out of the oven repeatedly to check.

 

If you buy a turkey that does not have the standard grocery store poultry salt solution added, you definitely should brine it.  I usually don't brine mine, but I do add fresh herbs and butter up under the skin.  I have been told "Your turkey will jump off this table and punch the boston market turkey in the face anyday!" and that made me really proud.  LOL

 

I follow the Alton Brown recipe for cooking, brining etc.

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I follow the Alton Brown recipe for cooking, brining etc.

 

The man is a culinary god. I've never had one of his recipes fail and I'll try anything he says at least once. His word is law in our kitchen.

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I love the idea of bags to prevent CC.

Forgot to mention it helps to fill the cavity with fresh herbs, garlic, lemon, etc. and then season liberally. I love to roast lemon halves cut side down with the turkey and squeeze the juice over the meat once carved. Also great with orange. It does not scream citrus and adds delicious mellow flavour. Yummy in the gravy, too.

Alton Brown is awesome!

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