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tonalynn

After Celiac Diagnoses - Were You Angry?

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I was mad. I felt totally ripped off. I missed decades and decades of good health (to hashi's and celiac disease) because three different family doctors were too dense to pick up on my symptoms.   :angry: The only autoimmune disease they picked up on was when I hit critical... I really don't trust doctors farther than I can throw them now a days. :ph34r: LOL 

 

 

 

Now, THIS type of anger I can totally relate to.  :D  and in all fairness, I should have said that in my earlier post. My recovery was slow and I have several health issues because of years of misdiagnoses.

 

but I had to get past that, too.

 

I decided celiac was not going to rob me of one more minute of my life.

I decided anger serves no purpose and just stressed my body out even further.

I decided to accept the hand I was dealt and help others so they do not have to go through years of hell.

 

We all get to be mad, grieve, even throw stuff around the back yard (yup, I did that!

It was therapeutic :lol:  do you guys have any idea how far a  toaster can bounce? yowzah!) but then, it's time to move forward.

 

and get a new toaster

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I'm going to chime in here because I believe attitude is everything.

 

Food has so many emotions attached to it.  Who doesn't love ice cream?  Who doesn't cringe at sour things?  We attach an emotion to the foods we eat.  We can be social with food, caring with food and passionate about food.  I decided to look at food like medicine.  I take thyroid meds to assist my failing thyroid, no problem.  I started to eat foods to nourish my body, not to make me feel good.  I stopped eating foods that were damaging to me.  After training myself to eat correctly and for the right reasons I noticed I started to enjoy food again.  I am just now to the point where I am enjoying cooking again.  It is a long and difficult process to adjust to.  And there is a ton of nasty tasting food out there, gluten filled or gluten free.  The only actual gluten free item I started with was bread to make toast.  Other than that I stuck to naturally gluten free items.  I didn't try to substitute, only changed the food choices.  This way I was never let down by the gluten free offerings at the store.  I always say that there are your glass half full peeps, your glass half empty peeps and then theirs me, I feel lucky to have a glass. :D

 

Colleen

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.  I always say that there are your glass half full peeps, your glass half empty peeps and then theirs me, I feel lucky to have a glass. :D

 

Colleen

 

Amen to that, dear Colleen. ;)

 

and I say "half full, half empty....eh, either way, it's time to go back up to the bar...."

 

 

TONALYN.....a few more thoughts

 

I have veal marsala, osso bucco, lasagne, gelato, antipasta, crostini and artisinal pizza in  my cooking line up all the time

 

This celiac can still rock Italian. Please do not despair. I promise you can do all this too.

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I've also been gluten-free for 6 weeks, diagnosed early October.  I think it's perfectly natural to have strong emotions when you first find out that there is something going on with your body that you have no control over and that will significantly alter your lifestyle.  What emotion you experience varies person-to-person.

 

That said... I went through a period of anger that was very not like me not too long ago... although for me it was not diagnosis related but rather hormone related because I'm also entering the whole pre-menopausal thing.  I started taking a really good B-Complex vitamin and it evened me right out.  Celiacs tend to be low in B vitamins and they have a lot to do with mood, among other things.  Stress and anger can also further use up your B vitamins, adding to the deficiency, making the emotional rollercoaster even worse.

 

As for cooking... cooking for one does take some getting used to.  But if you get frozen vegetables that are already cut up it can save you a ton of prep time.  And frozen vegies actually tend to be fresher and more full of vitamins than "fresh" vegies because those fresh vegies took god-knows-how-long to get to the store.  But frozen vegies are typically picked and frozen within hours.  I keep my meals simple - a protein source (beef, chicken, minimally-processed sausage, etc.), one or two vegies, and a carb (potatoes, rice, quinoa, a starchy vegy like squash or yams, etc.) - with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic, ginger, gluten-free soy sauce, or whatever spices you prefer you can make a really tasty meal in under 30min.  If you try to make the complicated fancy stuff you would get in a restaurant, then yes it will take forever and by the time it's done you'll be too tired to eat it.  I prefer NOT to make big batches of stuff because then you end up eating it over and over again until you never want to see it again... but that's just me.

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Oh, man.........toaster tossing as an Olympic sport!  Why didn't I think of that?  They should at least include this activity at Celiac gatherings, for the newly diagnosed.   :P

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I am continually surprised at the quantity and quality of the amazing responses from ya'll. Thank you again!

 

Gemini, I agree, my 1st post was very intense. But it was also accurate. My emotions have always been very intense, but most of the time appropriate to the situation. Lately I'm responding stronger and inappropriately to the situation, something I did years ago before going on anti-depressants. At least now I can recognize that's what I'm doing, but am unable to manage it. One of the main reasons I feel my anti-depressants have stopped working like they should. I'm desperately trying to find someone who can monitor/manage those meds through my gluten detox and healing, as I think they will continue to change how they work as my body changes. I do NOT want to slip back down to where I was before starting those meds. I think this is what concerns me the most, and it's governing how I respond to my new gluten-free lifestyle. I feel not only angry, but discouraged, easily irritated, misunderstood and very, very sad.

 

As for my Hashi's. Well....another never-ending battle. The doc that has been administering/montioring my bio-identical hormone replacements just keeps upping my dose of Armour Thyroid (I'm now on 180mg) and my numbers aren't right. I just had it tested on Tuesday, and my TSH is .048 (way too low), my T3 is 6.7 (way to high) and my Free T4 is 1.06 (fine). In May of 2012 my TSH was 3.51. In July of 2012 it was 4.52 and in July of 2013 it was 7.2. So you can see it's fluxuating wildly. I haven't felt any different through any of it. While I don't mind being on thyroid meds for the rest of my life, I WOULD like it to work and have it stabilize!

 

The foodies that responded definitely understood the loss I'm feeling. I'm a bread JUNKIE. I love baked things. Meals don't seem complete to me without bread. Beef stew? Crusty sourdough bread to go with it. Chili? Cornbread with that. Rolls, baguettes, English muffins, you name it! And although gluten-free pizza isn't bad, it's just not the same without the pizza "bones" (the thick, chewy edge of the crust).

 

I feel like the joy of eating good food has been taken away. In a way it has, until I find the gluten-free foods that I enjoy. I used to feel excited when going out to dinner, or preparing a favorite meal. I couldn't wait to taste it! And texture is a huge thing for me, a big part of why I like the foods I do is their texture. Now, I feel like I eat because I have to, not because I'm excited to do it. That will pass I'm sure, but for now I'm right in the thick of it.

 

Keep your responses coming! They ARE helping. One thing I do feel fortunate about is that I live very close to Boulder, Colorado. Boulder is a VERY health-concious, environmentally-concious, heck, EVERYTHING concious culture. To the point of annoying the rest of the state! But it is also VERY gluten friendly, and that attitude has branched out from that city to other parts of the state, making finding gluten-free options in stores and restaurants much easier. I am thankfull I live here and not somewhere that doesn't even know what gluten is, let alone what foods it's in. I can only imagine how celiacs struggle in those places!

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I was more relieved when I was first "diagnosed". It runs in my family (also both sides), so when I started feeling like absolute crud all the time, lost 10lb overnight, was an emotional wreck etc, I new gluten was probably the culprit. One week without it and THANK GOD! Yes, it sucked. My hardest thing to give up was beer. (though I've found some pretty good gluten-free beers, and my man just brought me a couple bottles all the way from NZ! Now that's love). Anyway, I was more angry when finding out that the most random stupid things had gluten in them too, or I couldn't eat at my favourite restaurants, etc. But everything I had to cut out meant I was one step closer to getting better, so it's not so much anger as resignation.

 

Then, along came the soy intolerance. Now THAT has pissed me off more than not. Gluten free is easy. Soy free is a pain in the arse! (not as bad as corn free. I feel for those who have to avoid that all-pervasive protein). There's soy in my tea?! Whaat? There's soy in my chocolate? WHAAAT??? I just can't get my head around why it has to be in EVERYTHING!? That pisses me off.

 

But anger doesn't get you anywhere. Moping doesn't get you anywhere. You figure things out. It takes a certain amount of discipline, but there is a pay-off. You start feeling better. Not just stomach-not-doing-stupid things better, but the fog lifts, the depression fades, good days turn into good weeks, and then one day you find that gluten-free substitute for that thing you love and it tastes GOOD! And you think, yup, I can do this.

 

So, you'll get through it.

A note about "taste buds". I don't think they deaden, but our tastes do change. I can certainly tell the difference between crappy gluten-free bread and good gluten-free bread, just as I could the difference between good/bad regular stuff. Same with beer, pasta, etc etc. There's good stuff out there. However, you do kind of have to forget just how regular stuff tastes like so you can enjoy the gluten-free versions. They taste different, but they can still taste good.

 

And the best gluten-free pasta comes from Italy. They've figured it out over there. And that's easy. Boil it. Pasta sauce. Frozen/fresh veg, some meat. Bam! done!

A rice cooker can also be your best friend.

 

Also if you're near Boulder: New Planet gluten-free beer is the best!

 

Anyway, welcome to the Forum. Good luck and happy healing!

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Oh, man.........toaster tossing as an Olympic sport!  Why didn't I think of that?  They should at least include this activity at Celiac gatherings, for the newly diagnosed.   :P

lolz - and the prize?  a BRAND NEW TOASTER!!  :lol:

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Oh, man.........toaster tossing as an Olympic sport!  Why didn't I think of that?  They should at least include this activity at Celiac gatherings, for the newly diagnosed.   :P

 

I may just add that to my Newbie 101 thread...".toaster tossing is a rite of passage".  :lol:

 

 

 

But anger doesn't get you anywhere. Moping doesn't get you anywhere. You figure things out. It takes a certain amount of discipline, but there is a pay-off. 

 

And the best gluten-free pasta comes from Italy. They've figured it out over there. 

 

Yes yes yes...to Everything Pegleg just said!!!!

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udi's makes pretty good baguettes, also against the grain.  rudi's has sandwich bread i absolutely adore.  i toast everything LOLZ i could eat rocks and not cut the roof of my mouth i have such a callous hahaha!  i like tinkyada pasta, it's very forgiving and doesn't fall apart as easily as corn pasta.  they make lasagne, too.  i have had d'oro orzo and it is good, and delallo <sp? pasta as well and it's pretty darn good.  if i just want a little french bread for bruschetta, i will take some scharr ciabatta rolls and put them in the oven then slice them.  it holds up to the sauce (also good just with butter) - you will learn many tricks :)  i do think my taste(s) have changed.  some gluten food (especially mcd's!) smells like puke to me anymore, so, i do not crave it.  or puke...

 

i

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I felt vindicated, because I'd been sick for so long, and had been referred to as a hypochondriac by my family for so long. It was proof to me that I wasn't nuts.  :D Lately, I've been getting a bit angry because now I'm discovering secondary intolerances. I'm fine with no gluten, but it's a lot more difficult when other foods become off limits. I've been a vegetarian for years, but it's looking more and more that I will have to start eating meat again because my darn diet is so limited these days! 

 

But back to the original question: I'm not angry about celiac. I am glad I found out at such a young age, rather than struggling with health problems my whole life. I'm very, very grateful for that.  

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.  some gluten food (especially mcd's!) smells like puke to me anymore, so, i do not crave it.  or puke...

 

 

 

always smelled a bit like puke to me but there was a time when I would eat it while traveling.

 

gives meaning to the phrase "convenience food".

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I am continually surprised at the quantity and quality of the amazing responses from ya'll. Thank you again!

 

Gemini, I agree, my 1st post was very intense. But it was also accurate. My emotions have always been very intense, but most of the time appropriate to the situation. Lately I'm responding stronger and inappropriately to the situation, something I did years ago before going on anti-depressants. At least now I can recognize that's what I'm doing, but am unable to manage it. One of the main reasons I feel my anti-depressants have stopped working like they should. I'm desperately trying to find someone who can monitor/manage those meds through my gluten detox and healing, as I think they will continue to change how they work as my body changes. I do NOT want to slip back down to where I was before starting those meds. I think this is what concerns me the most, and it's governing how I respond to my new gluten-free lifestyle. I feel not only angry, but discouraged, easily irritated, misunderstood and very, very sad.

 

As for my Hashi's. Well....another never-ending battle. The doc that has been administering/montioring my bio-identical hormone replacements just keeps upping my dose of Armour Thyroid (I'm now on 180mg) and my numbers aren't right. I just had it tested on Tuesday, and my TSH is .048 (way too low), my T3 is 6.7 (way to high) and my Free T4 is 1.06 (fine). In May of 2012 my TSH was 3.51. In July of 2012 it was 4.52 and in July of 2013 it was 7.2. So you can see it's fluxuating wildly. I haven't felt any different through any of it. While I don't mind being on thyroid meds for the rest of my life, I WOULD like it to work and have it stabilize!

 

 

Tonalynn........don't think I don't understand the bread thing and all your feelings of loss because I do.  The transition was easy for me, though, because I was down to 94 pounds and dying so that helped to change my attitude real quick. I honestly thought I was not going to make it the week I hit the wall with this disease.  You have not gotten there....yet, and I am glad you found out before this happened to you.

 

A few things.....the thyroid and anti-depressant thing.  You are NOT absorbing your meds so they are not going to be of much help right now.  What you are experiencing Hashi's-wise is normal and almost exactly the same thing happened to me.  My top dose was 150mcg and I could not stabilize my thyroid. I understand how wacky that makes you feel.  In fact, I do not think you need anti-depressants at all because having low thyroid affects your neurotransmitters in the brain (seratonin levels) and proper thyroid function is imperative for happy thoughts.  It's this big circle of players in your body....thyroid, adrenals, neurotransmitters.......they are all supposed to work together for optimal mental health and when one is off, its like dominoes. I have been there, done that so understand your feelings completely.  I am also not suggesting that you stop the anti-depressants at all but your body isn't utilizing them because of your trashed gut.

 

I am happy you are using Armour and your numbers closely resemble my struggle.  I am going through another struggle right now with my thyroid and I have been gluten-free for almost 9 years.  Hashi's may swing from time to time and it isn't always easy to maintain balance all of the time.  Many things can affect this. Your TSH is not necessarily too low.  T3 therapy (Armour) will drive down your TSH and that is not necessarily a bad thing, unless you are having hyperthyroid symptoms.  Doesn't sound like it though.  T3 is the active thyroid hormone and T4 converts to T3 in the body....that's why some docs will not prescribe T3 as they think you do not need it.  However, some people do not convert thyroid hormone well or utilize thyroid hormone optimally and that can complicate things.  I am having some trouble right now with that and trying to figure it out. My TSH is low, my T3 runs high and I do not know where my T4 is going because that is low.   I have been lowering my dose incrementally lately and my last blood work a month ago showed a bigger drop than there should have been for only dropping dosage by a quarter of a grain. I was taking 130 mcg and dropped it to 114 and my T3 went down too much.....not out of range but very close.  It was running just out of range on the high side at 130 mcg.  So, you see, even those of us who have healed can still struggle with this.

 

The reason I started to lower my dose is this.....I also have osteoporosis in my spine from Celiac and having too high of thyroid hormone can affect your bones. I have been doing weight training to build bone but I am also 54 years old and post-menopausal.  Talk about the cards being stacked against me!  I did this exercise (and still do) religiously for 3 years and had a repeat bone density this summer and was discouraged to see that there was NO improvement.  I have stopped the bone loss completely but I did not build measurable bone, either. You want to talk about depression and anger? That was my trigger....I was PISSED.  My PCP thinks it is from too much thyroid hormone but funny enough, I do not have any symptoms of hyper thyroid at all.  But I am slowly trying to see if I can lower it with good results and now am having a bit of trouble with that. I am not feeling hypo right now but my numbers are a bit wonky so here we go again with figuring it out. I may not be utilizing thyroid hormone well. I may have to re-think supplemental T3/T4 dose balance to find something that works.  But now I am bouncing between my PCP and thyroid doc to figure this out and I am beyond frustrated right now.  I work full time and don't have the time to keep running off to doctors and researching thyroid issues but I must. For a long time everything worked but lately...not so much.  I am not in crisis but with my numbers being slightly off, I have days when I feel down and much irritation that I have to work so hard sometimes to keep things in balance.....and then they are out of balance.

 

All I can say is please follow a strict gluten-free diet because this accounts for the wild fluctuations in your numbers.  Mine are not fluctuating that much anymore but I still need fine tuning myself.  I think the reason you are not feeling much different during this wild swing of yours is because you are so off from gluten consumption, you aren't going to feel any worse. Being sick from gluten can mask so many other things. 

 

BTW....do you have antibody levels for your thyroid tested? That is important also and many doctors do not test anti-body levels.  I am curious to see what they are, if you don't mind.  

 

Boulder, Colorado is gorgeous and I had to laugh at your comment about it being annoying to the rest of the state, over some issues. I have been there as my brother-in-law lives in Fort Collins.  Boulder is very liberal, whereas I am a conservative but I don't let that bother me. You are blessed to live in such a beautiful area that is gluten-free friendly so keep that in mind.

 

Gotta go and I hope I did not make your head spin! If I learn any new tips on thyroid management, I will be sure to share them with you.

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As for my Hashi's. Well....another never-ending battle. The doc that has been administering/montioring my bio-identical hormone replacements just keeps upping my dose of Armour Thyroid (I'm now on 180mg) and my numbers aren't right. I just had it tested on Tuesday, and my TSH is .048 (way too low), my T3 is 6.7 (way to high) and my Free T4 is 1.06 (fine). In May of 2012 my TSH was 3.51. In July of 2012 it was 4.52 and in July of 2013 it was 7.2. So you can see it's fluxuating wildly. I haven't felt any different through any of it. While I don't mind being on thyroid meds for the rest of my life, I WOULD like it to work and have it stabilize!

If you are taking Armour, your TSH will probably be suppressed. Because Armour has more T3 than a human would, your body will note almost no need to produce TSH - there is enough T3 for it. I take 150 mg Thyroid (Canadian version of Armour) and my TSH is 0.01 - completely suppressed - yet my free T3 is at bout 70-75% of my lab's normal reference range so I feel fine (Free T4 is at about 60%). When I first started with natural desiccated thyroid, I took 180 mg; my TSH was 0.2ish (in my lab's range) but my free T3 was above the normal range and I felt hyper. Yuck!

I mentioned my history to point out that TSH is not a real important test when taking natural desiccated thyroid, it is the free T3, and to a lesser extent the free T4, that will help you with your labs. If your free T3 is too high, you might need to cut back.

  

udi's makes pretty good baguettes, also against the grain.  rudi's has sandwich bread i absolutely adore.  i toast everything LOLZ i could eat rocks and not cut the roof of my mouth i have such a callous hahaha!  i like tinkyada pasta, it's very forgiving and doesn't fall apart as easily as corn pasta.  they make lasagne, too.  i have had d'oro orzo and it is good, and delallo <sp? pasta as well and it's pretty darn good.  if i just want a little french bread for bruschetta, i will take some scharr ciabatta rolls and put them in the oven then slice them.  it holds up to the sauce (also good just with butter) - you will learn many tricks :)  i do think my taste(s) have changed.  some gluten food (especially mcd's!) smells like puke to me anymore, so, i do not crave it.  or puke...

 

i

LOL I used to actually like fillet o'fish sandwiches.... Just grosses me out now.

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Thanks, Nicole, for chiming in with your expertise!  You are one smart cookie!   :)

Nah! I was just given the run around by those doctors who I "love soooo much", so I had to figure out how to best treat myself....and pay out of pocket for a doctor willing to prescribe NDT after months of searching for someone to listen to me Lol

I should add, try to get your free T3 measured and not the T3. T3 isn't as helpful.

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You have to learn as much as you can about thyroid disease when you have it because you could get seriously messed up from many docs over it.

Some of their ideas will keep a person sick.  Drives me crazy.

 

I have my free T3/T4 and reverse T3 tested. I should have been more specific. She forgot the TSH this time, which really isn't a show stopper but I like to know anyway.  I have to delve deeper because my levels dump down a little too much with very small dose changes.  I had hoped to go down lower than I am because of the osteo but I don't want to risk running it too low. Sometimes this is too much work!   :wacko:

 

Back to Thyroid Function 101!

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Gemini, you're right, I don't think any of my meds work like they should since I haven't really been absorbing them properly. I expect that all of them will need to be adjusted/reduced several times as I heal. I just had my doc lower my Armour to 150mg from 180, and I'm sure in the next few months they'll lower it again. The lab forgot to run the Reverse T3, but I got my request in just in time so I don't have to give more blood. I should get the results this week. In August, my RT3 was right in the middle of the range.

 

My Hashi's has always given the weirdest mix of symptoms. I'm beyond fatigued all the time, I can't even exercise because of it. Just getting through my day is exhausting. Exercise for me is when I finally store enough energy to vacuum the house! I'm about 35 pounds overweight (most of it in my middle). I can't go to sleep or stay asleep, so I have to nap during the day (a nap to me is a minimum of 2 hours) and that just aggrivates the cycle. One things that's totally different from other Hashi sufferers - while most of them cannot tolerate cold, I cannot tolerate HOT. And hot to me is anything above 65 degrees. I hate summer as I'm so miserable in the heat, it makes me feel sick and even more tired than normal. I see people around here bundled up in heavy jackets and scarves and I'm in a t-shirt and still too hot. Not even peri-menopausal yet, and it's not hot flashes, I just hate being hot!

 

I'm sure the depression is a direct result of the Hashi's, which in turn is probably a direct result of Celiac. When I started taking the anti-depressants over 10 years ago, I had never even heard of celiac disease, and would have never connected it with my symptoms. But I do feel I needed them because my entire thought process changed. You know that old song that goes "I can see clearly now, the rain has gone..."? That's how I felt. I had no idea that my thinking was so different than normal, and that there WAS light at the end of the tunnel. Depression and mental illness run on both sides of my family, and I'm pretty convinced I have (or at least had) a chemical imbalance that intensified my depression. Could that chemical imbalance be from gluten? Quite possibly. But even as a little kid, my mother tells me I was not a happy child. I've always been somewhat depressed. I have every finger and every toe crossed that when my body finally heals from all the gluten I've eaten over the years that I will no longer need anti-depressants. I never wanted to be on them in the first place, but I couldn't function without them.

 

Ahh, so if you've been to Fort Collins, you've heard the term "People's Republic of Boulder"! It is definitely a wacky type of culture, but I'm happy they're so diet-concious because it makes living here a lot easier now that I know I have celiac. I've been joking with my friends that we may live near a city that quite possibly lets their dogs vote, but at least we don't live in the deep south, where if you asked if some food was gluten-free, you'd probably get a quizzical look followed by "gluten? what's that? We don't put glue in our food, that's disgusting!" :-)

 

No offense to any deep southerners here! :-)

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The more you reveal about yourself, tonalynn, the funnier it gets!  I am also EXTREMELY intolerant of heat and have been since I was knee high to a grasshopper.  Going through menopause only made that worse but the hot flashes are not quite as bad as they were when I was first diagnosed over 8 years ago.  But for me, the perfect temperature range is 55-65 degrees and when it snows....I am beyond happy.  I just love winter.  I am full blown Hashi's too so go figure.  :blink:  It's a pleasure to meet someone who hates heat because we are rare birds.

 

You say your family has a history of depression and mental illness?  My father's side of the family does also but I think that needs to be looked at differently.  Since Celiac is a genetic disease, I think it more likely that those who suffer in your family actually have a history of Celiac, with depression and mental illness as a symptom.  I have a double Celiac gene so it's on both sides of my family.  When I look back at my family history and what people suffered and died from, it was such an eye opening experience. They all scream of Celiac. Chemical and hormonal imbalances are common with Celiac so there is the cause of the depression.  I do not believe depression is a disease state unto itself but a symptom of an underlying problem.

 

As for the People's Republic.......I live in Massachusetts but please do not hold that against me!  ;)  I am sure you have heard of Cambridge, Mass.?  The original People's Republic?  I am not a Massachusetts Democrat so we have fun with that.   I picked up on that when I visited Boulder...you can't miss it.  But that doesn't mean Boulder cannot be enjoyed and admired for it's beauty and.....I thought, very friendly natives.  And you know......maybe the dogs having the vote will get us better results..... :lol:  I just couldn't resist that one.  :ph34r:

 

Be patient because there is every reason to hope that once your gut heals and food is being properly absorbed, your med needs will diminish.....except for the Hashi's related hormone replacement. Your dose will most likely be reduced but I doubt you can stop taking the hormone.

No bother......it's such a little pill.  Be good!  :)

 

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whew!  saying a prayer for my thyroid.  and y'all's thyroids.  (my sister has issues, i suppose it's a matter of time)  i thought celiac and the'betes were complicated! 

 

i'm from jersey, tonalynn, but i live in tennessee.  here, there and everywhere:  people are dumb about gluten :)  jersey people will fight about it, tennessee people don't care that they don't know lololz - j/k~!   :lol:  

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As for the People's Republic.......I live in Massachusetts but please do not hold that against me!  ;)  I am sure you have heard of Cambridge, Mass.?  The original People's Republic?  I am not a Massachusetts Democrat so we have fun with that.  

hey, hey, hey now..!!.Cambridge born and bred girl standing right here and you know it, missy.  :lol:

 

The coolest republic I know is the Conch Republic of Key West...but I digress....carry on, you two.

 

Tonalynn, I can honestly say Gemini (who I am now proud to call my friend) was one of the first to reach out to me when I came on

c.com back in 2010, so listen to this wise woman.  :D

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hey, hey, hey now..!!.Cambridge born and bred girl standing right here and you know it, missy.  :lol:

 

The coolest republic I know is the Conch Republic of Key West...but I digress....carry on, you two.

 

Tonalynn, I can honestly say Gemini (who I am now proud to call my friend) was one of the first to reach out to me when I came on

c.com back in 2010, so listen to this wise woman.  :D

I was wondering how long it would take to spark a reply out of you on that one, Irishheart!  :lol:  And this will prove that you can take a Massachusetts Democrat and an Independent Conservative and they can become fast friends.  I would never survive in this state if I let politics choose my friends. I figure if I can live here and survive, I can live anywhere.  But you have to admit......there is that building on Mass. Ave. that has "People's Republic" painted on the side of it...and I didn't do it!

 

They do have great restaurants, though....... ;)

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I was wondering how long it would take to spark a reply out of you on that one, Irishheart!  :lol:  And this will prove that you can take a Massachusetts Democrat and an Independent Conservative and they can become fast friends.  I would never survive in this state if I let politics choose my friends. I figure if I can live here and survive, I can live anywhere.  But you have to admit......there is that building on Mass. Ave. that has "People's Republic" painted on the side of it...and I didn't do it!

 

They do have great restaurants, though....... ;)

 

:lol: when  I moved to NY, I registered as an Independent (which baffled my Dad ) and now that we live in Florida, this could get very interesting.

I am not sure there is such a thing as an independent liberal conservative democrat. (I am such a mess)

 

One thing I learned a long time ago, religion and politics never get in the way of a true friendship

 

and having celiac is a bond that goes deeper anyway. ;) 

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Well........I consider myself an independent, liberal leaning conservative, if that makes any sense. I do tend to support ideals from BOTH sides of the aisle, which I think is more the norm today for many people. That's the Gemini twin in me. It's the polarizing extremes that are such a problem today...on both sides.  Let's face it...we need to fire everyone in Washington and elect all new people.  Preferably Celiac people because we have the brain fog thing conquered!  :lol:

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