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Did Anyone See The New Study Published About Gluten In Orthodontic Materials?

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24137038

 

Do you think it's something to worry about? I don't want to be crazy crazy, but I do have to sleep in a bite guard, and will have to continue sleeping in it for the rest of my life. What do you think? Is gluten in retainers and bite guards an issue? Or, because it's solid and you aren't likely to be chipping bits off to eat, is it fine? 

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I would make sure that any thing that my mouth encounters be gluten free, especially if it's there to stay or being used repeatedly. Knowing what I do now, I would go so far as to make sure that ALL of my orthodontic materials were gluten free even if I didn't have celiac disease / gluten sensitivity. Since a third of the US population has a celiac gene, and the condition can be triggered at any point in someone's life (where the individual was previously able to tolerate gluten until then), it would seem a wise precaution.

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I had found that article as well.  Here's the thread and discussion regarding it:

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/104736-could-your-retainer-be-preventing-healing-yes/

 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24137038

 

Do you think it's something to worry about? I don't want to be crazy crazy, but I do have to sleep in a bite guard, and will have to continue sleeping in it for the rest of my life. What do you think? Is gluten in retainers and bite guards an issue? Or, because it's solid and you aren't likely to be chipping bits off to eat, is it fine? 

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I need a guard but haven't gotten one yet because I am getting an implant next winter. I did see that case study but saw not reason to be concerned or alarmed. There are the reasons mentioned in that other thread, and lets face it... if we look back on our 9 year old selves our dental hygiene probably left something to be desired. Practice makes perfect and you just aren't as adept at brushing at 9 as you are when you get older, and frequently you're in a hurry because you have better things to be doing. More than anything it is a chore, more so if you have a retainer to be worrying about cleaning and caring for. You get glutened one time, don't properly clean your retainer and suddenly you have a problem blamed on the retainer. (I'm not saying that's what happened, I'm saying it's possible... as are a great many things with the little information presented.)

 

At any rate, with proper care and cleaning of a guard and being sure to always make sure you brush before putting it in so that it never is at risk of a CC issue if you are glutened I see no reason to be worried. I frankly can't wait to get mine, I just can't fathom wasting the couple hundred bucks on one now just to replace it in a year.

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I would make sure that any thing that my mouth encounters be gluten free, especially if it's there to stay or being used repeatedly. Knowing what I do now, I would go so far as to make sure that ALL of my orthodontic materials were gluten free even if I didn't have celiac disease / gluten sensitivity. Since a third of the US population has a celiac gene, and the condition can be triggered at any point in someone's life (where the individual was previously able to tolerate gluten until then), it would seem a wise precaution.

 

A third of the US population has the celiac gene? I have never seen that estimate before. Can you point me to that Pub Med article please? thanks! 

 

Just a note about the celiac-related genes. Just because someone has the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 gene, it does not mean the person will

definitely develop celiac disease. It just means there is a risk associated with it.

Many people without celiac carry those same HLA sequences.

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Irish Heart, I was hoping you would chime in. And I was pretty sure that your response would be something along those lines. Thanks. :) Powerofpositivethinking, sorry for re-posting this, I hadn't realized it was already being discussed. Adalaide, I can definitely see how that might have been the case with the little girl. I'm pretty sure my dental hygiene at that age wasn't so great! Going to check out the other thread now. 

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A third of the US population has the celiac gene? I have never seen that estimate before. Can you point me to that Pub Med article please? thanks! 

 

Just a note about the celiac-related genes. Just because someone has the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 gene, it does not mean the person will

definitely develop celiac disease. It just means there is a risk associated with it.

Many people without celiac carry those same HLA sequences.

 

My doctor estimated it at 40 percent.  My gastro-intestinal doctor estimated it at 30-35 %.

 

CeliacDisease.com estimates it at up to 40 percent: http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/diagnosingceliacdisease/a/Celiac-Disease-Genetic-Testing.htm

 

From Medscape:

"Approximately 95% of celiac disease patients express HLA-DQ2, and the remaining patients are usually HLA-DQ8 positive. However, the HLA-DQ2 allele is common and is carried by approximately 30% of Caucasian individuals. Thus, HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 is necessary for disease development but is not sufficient for disease development; its estimated risk effect is only 36-53%."

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1790189-overview

 

Quest Diagnostics puts it between 25 and 40 percent:

http://www.questdiagnostics.com/testcenter/testguide.action?dc=TS_HLA_Celiac

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From Medscape:

"Approximately 95% of celiac disease patients express HLA-DQ2, and the remaining patients are usually HLA-DQ8 positive. However, the HLA-DQ2 allele is common and is carried by approximately 30% of Caucasian individuals. Thus, HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 is necessary for disease development but is not sufficient for disease development; its estimated risk effect is only 36-53%."

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1790189-overview

36-53 percent of the 30 percent of people who carry the gene develop the disease.  that is different than what you are purporting.

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Well, I was curious about what GlutenMaestro posted, so I did a search and found this on the University of Chicago Celiac Center's website:

 

"When the genetic predisposition for celiac disease was detected (on Chromosome 6) researchers noted that the genes were a necessary but not sufficient condition for the disease to develop. In fact, up to 1/3 of the U.S. population has the genes for celiac disease. Meaning, those who have the DQ2 or DQ8 gene can develop celiac disease at any time, but only about 5% of those people actually will."

 

Again, the presence of the gene may be necessary, but it is not sufficient for developing

C D.

 

Bu before we stray too far off topic....back to dental materials. :D 

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36-53 percent of the 30 percent of people who carry the gene develop the disease.  that is different than what you are purporting.

 

Nope.  You missed the second sentence:  "However, the HLA-DQ2 allele is common and is carried by approximately 30% of Caucasian individuals."

I don't think anyone is saying that everyone who has either of the genes actually gets the disease - or that 30% of the population gets the disease.  Just that approximately one-third of the population has at least one of the genes.  I've seen estimates between 25 and 40 percent.

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My orthodontist looked into my invisalign trays and informed me there is nothing gluten related for me to worry about.  I called ahead of my follow up appointment with this question and when I arrived he told me he researched my question and that everything checked out.

 

Here's the disclosure, I'm choosing to trust him on this.  I trust that he actually looked into it and didn't just make it up to make me feel better.  My trays were already purchased and paid for so he has no reason to tell me otherwise.

 

So for what its worth...

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Nope.  You missed the second sentence:  "However, the HLA-DQ2 allele is common and is carried by approximately 30% of Caucasian individuals."

I don't think anyone is saying that everyone who has either of the genes actually gets the disease - or that 30% of the population gets the disease.  Just that approximately one-third of the population has at least one of the genes.  I've seen estimates between 25 and 40 percent.

 

 

Just a minute here while we review how this tangent started because apples/oranges are being mixed

 

Glutenmaestro said:

Since a third of the US population has a celiac gene, and the condition can be triggered at any point in someone's life 

 

1/3 of the US population  

 

is certainly not the same as 

 

 30% of Caucasian individuals 

 

?? right??

 

:unsure:

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My orthodontist looked into my invisalign trays and informed me there is nothing gluten related for me to worry about.  I called ahead of my follow up appointment with this question and when I arrived he told me he researched my question and that everything checked out.

 

Here's the disclosure, I'm choosing to trust him on this.  I trust that he actually looked into it and didn't just make it up to make me feel better.  My trays were already purchased and paid for so he has no reason to tell me otherwise.

 

So for what its worth...

 

I had a mouth guard, too hon. (good news--I do not need it anymore. off gluten, we may stop clenching our teeth!! whoohoo!)

No gluten issues whatsoever! the dental tech in my dentist's  office vetted every single thing in the office for me

and she found NO gluten in any dental products there. FWIW 

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Good to know. Thanks! I thought about it and figured if there was an issue with my guard, I wouldn't be getting better, and, except for the few oopsies I've had here and there, my good days have slowly begun to outnumber my bad. Hooray! 

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My mother just ordered aligners from her dentist - I can't be sure that they are the "Invisalign" brand - but her dentist said the same thing.  No gluten issues.  And he's a bit more on the "health" side of the medical profession, if you know what I mean, so I would tend to trust him to not just say things to placate people.

 

 

As far as the tangential conversation related to how many people carry the Celiac gene(s) - I cited 3 different sources plus 2 different doctors.  One specified a percentage for only caucasians.  The others did not.  But all estimated the overall percentage to be anywhere from 25 to 40 percent, with only one saying it may be as low as 25.  Which in my book, when looked at in totality, equates to roughly one-third of the population.  So I agree with Glutenmaestro.

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