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This is my first post and I'm wondering if anyone can help me out.

 

I had blood work done and was put on Vitamin D 50,000 IU for two months then off one month. After another round of testing, my results were as follows:

 

Total - 22

D3 - 6

D2 - 16

 

My current doctor now has me on 1,000 IU a day. Something in me just doesn't think this is enough. If the 50,000 IU only took the D3 up high enough to have me at 6 after two months on and one month off, is 1,000 IU a day really going to do anything? I've read quite a bit and think I should be on more. Just looking for other opinions though.

 

I was diagnosed via bloodwork and biopsy 13 months ago. I'm also lactose intolerant.

 

Thanks in advance

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It sounds like you doctor is current with the latest recommendations which came out relatively recently.  If you are in the US, 20 is considered just fine.

 

What your levels should be depend on the units used for the test which are different in the US and Canada.  Also, a lot of tests still use out dated values.  This is the latest information that I know about: http://www.iom.edu/R...-vitamin-D.aspx

 

This is the press release which gives a summary: http://www8.national...?RecordID=13050

 

" The measurements of sufficiency and deficiency — the cutpoints — that clinical laboratories use to report test results have not been based on rigorous scientific studies and are not standardized."

 

"almost all individuals get sufficient vitamin D when their blood levels are at or above 20 nanograms per milliliter as it is measured in America, or 50 nanomoles per liter as measured in Canada. "

 

"Upper intake levels represent the upper safe boundary and should not be misunderstood as amounts people need or should strive to consume.  The upper intake levels for vitamin D are 2,500 IUs per day for children ages 1 through 3; 3,000 IUs daily for children 4 through 8 years old; and 4,000 IUs daily for all others. "

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It sounds like you doctor is current with the latest recommendations which came out relatively recently.  If you are in the US, 20 is considered just fine.

 

 

 

 

Mine was 13. Then it creeped up to 29. My doc wanted me over 50.

Maybe there is no agreement among professionals (which does not surprise me) 

 

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

 

Table 1: Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] Concentrations and Health* [1] nmol/L** ng/mL* Health status <30 <12 Associated with vitamin D deficiency, leading to rickets in infants and children and osteomalacia in adults 30–50 12–20 Generally considered inadequate for bone and overall health in healthy individuals ≥50 ≥20 Generally considered adequate for bone and overall health in healthy individuals >125 >50 Emerging evidence links potential adverse effects to such high levels, particularly >150 nmol/L (>60 ng/mL)

* Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D are reported in both nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) and nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL).

** 1 nmol/L = 0.4 ng/mL

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My nutritionist recommended to me that she wanted my Vit D level around 70.  I started out at 23 and was taking 5,000 IU a day and it took 6 months to bring it up to 43.  I am still taking 5,000 IU a day. 

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My nutritionist recommended to me that she wanted my Vit D level around 70.  I started out at 23 and was taking 5,000 IU a day and it took 6 months to bring it up to 43.  I am still taking 5,000 IU a day. 

 

As far as I know, the recommended highest threshold  dose per week is no more than 10,000 IUs**. Be careful, hon.

You really can overdo supplements of all kinds contrary to those who think "more is better and we just pee it out".

Not really true.

 

Edited to add: That should read 28,000 IUs Math/typo/stoopid error)

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As far as I know, the recommended highest threshold  dose per week is no more than 10,000 IUs. Be careful, hon.

You really can overdo supplements of all kinds contrary to those who think "more is better and we just pee it out".

Not really true.

 

Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat soluble and get stores in the fat tissue and can reach toxicity levels if you over supplement. Irish is right about that. Water soluble vitamins, however you can take excessively and you will pee them out.

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I have to add that even the Bs can accumulate too much. 

I had too much B6 in my system (which gave me nerve/ burning pain)

and then, very high B-12 in my system.

 

My doc had me back waaay the heck off and stop supplementing.

 

Once you start absorbing, you really can achieve toxic levels of all vitamins.

I know what it says on various places on the internet, but I had it happen to me.

Just sayin. :)

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This reference gives the same numbers as the one I gave.  It says 

"≥20 Generally considered adequate for bone and overall health in healthy individuals" - thats ng/mL, the units used in the US.

 

As far as your doctor saying that he wants you above 50, it also says 

">50 Emerging evidence links potential adverse effects to such high levels, particularly >150 nmol/L (>60 ng/mL)"

 

 

I would discuss that with your doctor.  Since this is emerging evidence, he may not be aware of it yet.

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As far as I know, the recommended highest threshold  dose per week is no more than 10,000 IUs. Be careful, hon.

You really can overdo supplements of all kinds contrary to those who think "more is better and we just pee it out".

Not really true.

 

My reference above, as well as the one you linked to, IrishHeart, give 4,000 IU as the upper threshold for daily safe intake.

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My reference above, as well as the one you linked to, IrishHeart, give 4,000 IU as the upper threshold for daily safe intake.

well, my math/typing really sucks...Thanks, Steph!!.  

(sorry, I meant to type  around 20,000 IUs)  But even still... that would be more like 28,000 IUs.

 

I will edit it.

 

I am sure my doc(this is the female GYN) had her reasons for wanting mine just above 50

( I was headed toward osteoporosis) but I can ask.

 

 I do not take any high doses of any supplements anymore anyway.. I take cal/mag.D 1200/600/1000 IUs. daily. No need for mega doses of B-12, folate as I once did.

 

I live in Florida now and  I get enough sunshine.  :)  And obviously, it has gone to my head

because I can't type or add today....I plead hot and humid.? lol 

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I can't gain and hold D or iron, which is a major issue because of my thyroid.

This week my doc finally put me on 50k iu LIQUID D3/week for a while. I take 25k 2x a week.

You probably can't absorb pulls very well - Cekiac can do that. She has several Celiac/Hashis patients that are stuck like this. We are focusing now more on rebuilding gut and calming autoimmunity (2 1/2 years gluten-free so you'd think this would have happened - no other obvious intolerances and yet...).

Anyway, I am on super powdered probiotics and l-glutamine now along with iron, multis, chromium...

I suggest powdered and liquid vitamins if you have an issue gaining vit levels. Next stop for me is d3 injections. My iron isn't low enough for infusions, but seems to at least rise and hold better with supplaments.

So, 50k/week is not unheard of if you've tried the traditional up to 5k/day route. I also get bloodwork every 3 months (gotta love thyroid disease)...so my d levels are monitored.

I can't stop taking d or iron or my levels dive...so I don't understand why you were off d for a month after the 50k. You should have been tested at the end of that month. You may need much higher doses to keep your d up.

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I can't stop taking d or iron or my levels dive...

 

Why is that Prickly?

could there be something else going on?

 

My dad's iron levels dumped frequently. He had bi-weekly blood transfusions for 8+ years.

But, he had intestinal bleeds (surely, he was an undiagnosed celiac, we now know)

 

I worry about you. :unsure: xx

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Why is that Prickly?

could there be something else going on?

My dad's iron levels dumped frequently. He had bi-weekly blood transfusions for 8+ years.

But, he had intestinal bleeds (surely, he was an undiagnosed celiac, we now know)

I worry about you. :unsure: xx

We don't know. There's lots of paperwork out there where Hashis patients struggle with d and iron (which are ironically imperative for meds to work). I haven't found a study showing if this is because of celiac disease or Hashis. I did find something about how hypothyroid patients don't transmit nutrients well, which contributes - this is at the cellular feedback level, not absorption. Same way we don't complete our thyroid feedback loop. I know I'm saying this badly...but the point is that it probably goes beyond the gut.

Right now we're trying to boost vit levels to boost thyroid med uptake. Sometimes they get stuck in a loop and something needs to give. Having luck with t3, hoping d and iron go up and help with all of it. Hashis is kicking my butt.

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Oh my goodness!! Thank you all so much for the info!

 

I was off the 50,000 because the doc who put me on it was a rheumatologist who I only saw once because he was a jerk. I couldn't get in to see my primary before my script ran out and they wouldn't refill the script without retesting my level.

 

I'm not sure what my level was before the 50,000. The rheumatologist, who, as I already said was a jerk, has yet to send the records to my primary doc.

 

Perhaps I should talk to my GI doc about the vitamin d levels instead of my primary. Maybe she would better understand the need to increase the level than the first year resident who is my primary at the clinic I go to.

 

Thank you all again! I never expected so many answers!!

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