Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Thickleg

Seasoning Mixes - Learning It The Hard Way

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi  Folks

 

I've been living gluten-free for 3 1/2 months now - so I thought. But for about five weeks now I felt very tired and I suffered from brainfog. Ok, I was ill with the flue and lay in bed for a week; that could be an explanation; but there was another symptom: My legs felt heavy and I had problems walking right after standing up from a chair. After walking some meters it gets better. This is not a symptom of the flue. I know that from gluten. And I had some small lesions in the skin that reminded me of DH.

 

I started thinking and examined everything I had eaten. Here is my result:

 

- I have bought a salad sauce that following the label contains no wheat. But it contains a "seasoning mix". I found the exact declaration of the ingredients of another salad sauce from the same house in the internet. The seasoning mix contains wheat. I have sent an e-mail to the producer to know the exact details of my favorite; but I guess I already know the answer.

 

- At an aperitiv three weeks ago I ate the only thing I could eat: roasted chicken. Yesterday I was at another aperitiv and before starting to eat the only thing I could eat (chicken) I asked the caterer if the seasoning mix on the chicken contains gluten. It does.

 

- I phoned my brother to be sure that the ice-cream I had at his house on christmas eve really was gluten-free. It was. But my brother investigated further. The seasoning mix he uses for the rice contains wheat.

 

I realise that even food I never-ever would think there's wheat in, contains wheat. I was at a restaurant and discussed my possibilities for a desert with the waitress. She recomended sorbet. I asked her to verify that it was really gluten-free as during the last few weeks I had become skeptical. Guess what the answer was. The sorbet contained gluten. I got a wonderful house-made cream. At the table we discussed why in the world sorbet should contain gluten. We found no answer, but I have to live with the fact! Of course there are brands of sorbet, that don't contain gluten and there are seasoning mixes, that contain no gluten, too. But one has to verify everything.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The good news is, they have to list wheat as an ingredient. It can't hide as " seasoning" or "spice". The bad news is, you have to read everything because they seem to use wheat as a cheap filler to make the taco seasoning, or whatever seasoning, seem fuller.

This is for the US, Canada and some other countries.

I would either not eat at these gathering or being my own snack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kareng

In Switzerland they have to write the declaration too - at least the big companies. With the small local producers, who produce a limited amount, the law is not that strict. The salad sauce comes from a little family-owned creamery 15km away and is only sold in some nearby villages. That's the reason, why I bought it. Industrial salad-sauces have a terrible taste. But this family-made sauce ist just wonderful in taste! Like homemade... But as tasty as it is, I think it contains gluten. But let's see what they answer.

:-))))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel exactly the same way as you do!  I thought I was being so careful, and I felt great about being gluten free for a few months.  Today I realized that Swanson Vegetable Broth is not gluten free like the chicken and beef broth.  I was making yet another healthy pot of soup and decided to scan the bar code while I was waiting for the soup to simmer.  BAM!  It's not gluten free!  That would explain why I've been so gassy lately.  It also means that the soups and stews I put in the freezer are not safe for me to eat.  I don't remember which ones had chicken vs. vegetable broth.  So disappointing in so many ways….   Lesson learned!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel exactly the same way as you do!  I thought I was being so careful, and I felt great about being gluten free for a few months.  Today I realized that Swanson Vegetable Broth is not gluten free like the chicken and beef broth.  I was making yet another healthy pot of soup and decided to scan the bar code while I was waiting for the soup to simmer.  BAM!  It's not gluten free!  That would explain why I've been so gassy lately.  It also means that the soups and stews I put in the freezer are not safe for me to eat.  I don't remember which ones had chicken vs. vegetable broth.  So disappointing in so many ways….   Lesson learned!  

 

 

Just a word of caution... not all Swanson chicken broth is gluten free either.

 

 

The wheat will be labelled in the ingredients.  Stupid to put wheat in it..... but at least you can read the ingredients.  I like Kitchen Basics

 

http://kitchenbasics.elsstore.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kareng and Gilligan

 

Thank you for all your replies!

 

Gilligan and I are surely not the only ones who make the same beginner-mistakes... Gilligan: Looking forward to your post, that you fell better after not eating the contaminated broth anymore!

 

I got the anwer from the creamery: No gluten in my favorite Salad-Sauce. The "wheat" in the other sauce is a different Seasoning-Mix, that my favorit doesn't contain. And in the other sauce the wheat is clearly declared. So my life get's easyer and happier again with my favorite salad-sauce (but stilll without roasted-chicken at aperitivs and with another mix at my brothers!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to gluten free also.  I am scared of most things.  I make my own salad dressings.  I also make my own seasoning mixes by using gluten free single spices.   I do not ingest anything that I do not know is gluten free.  I've only been out to restaurants a couple of times since going gluten free and I question the servers like crazy.  Better safe than sorry.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sell spices and get lots of inquiries about gluten in our products. The answer is always no but in casual conversation with a lot of these people, they are not gluten intolerant, they just think it's trendy not to consume gluten. I wonder how many fit into this category? Actually they may unconsciously be helping those who truly have an intolerance or have Celiac by driving up demand for gluten free products. Interesting.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see that some people commenting about buying foods based on the ingredients lists and I'm half jealous that their reactions are so minor that they can't tell when there are minute amounts of gluten, but at the same time, concerned that they are telling people that foods are safe when they are not.

In my experience, the only processed items that are 100% safe are those that say gluten free on the label. That means that the manufacturer is not only paying attention to the ingredients but also to hidden sources that may come from premade ingredients bought from third-party suppliers, and cross contamination from equipment used to produce items that do contain gluten, or even items simply made in shared facilities. 

I have a jar of powdered garlic on my shelf right now that I'm certain contains gluten despite making no mention of any sort of anti-flaking ingredients on the label. No doubt, it was processed in a facility that was not dedicated gluten-free, powdered ingredients being almost impossible to control, even coming down from the air.

Nuts sometimes get me. Buying unsalted seems to help as does buying bulk, so again, powdered ingredients in shared facilities with shared machinery seems to be the problem.

For the first month that I was gluten free, I continued to eat my favorite spaghetti sauce, hoping it was safe. It wasn't. I even called the manufacturer, hoping, but all they could confirm was that it likely DID contain gluten.

It probably took me 4-5 containers of ice cream over 7-8 months before I gave up trying. One time everything would seem to be fine, another time not, so I'm guessing whether or not it was contaminated was related to what kind of ice cream was made on the machinery prior. I will eventually figure out how to make it from scratch at home, but until that happens, I'll just have to be satisfied with not feeling guilty about eating empty calories.

I'm not saying that there aren't plenty of foods out there that are safe, but just don't presume anything.

There are also plenty of products being sold as gluten free that I won't touch. Any baked product that didn't come out of a dedicated facility won't make it into my grocery cart and I have found that brands that make both gluten-free and gluten products are more likely to have issues with their gluten-free line. (I won't buy Amy's brand gluten-free pot pies or anything from the Whole Foods bakery.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

McCormick's brand spices are gluten free. I too had a bad reaction to spices and went through my cabinet and chucked anything questionable. It took a bit of money to replace everything, but now I can cook without having to think twice. 

 

Below is a link I read that got me to switch:

 

 

 

http://glutenfreegirl.com/2011/07/why-we-have-been-using-mccormick-gourmet-spices/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...