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iamtganderson

Gluten-Free Foods That Are Not High In Sugar, Fat Or Salt?

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I'm aware of quite a few brands of gluten-free products (Glutino, Udi, etc...) but I also know that many packaged gluten-free foods make up0 fro taste by adding extra sugar, fat and/or salt.  Is there a listing somewhere to find those that aren't going to add the pounds on or clog the arteries while my son adn i go gluten-free?

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Simplest answer, but you might not like it.  Instead of replacing bread, pancakes, pasta, etc, learn to live without them, or minimal amounts.  Eat meat, eggs, veggies, fruits, cheese, nuts, potatoes, rice - real food.  Look into Paleo and South Beach diets for ways to cut down on grains and starches.  Also saves money over the cost of gluten-free replacements.  The latest studies show no link between dietary saturated fat and heart disease, but there is a link with sugar and carbs.  Two eggs with spinach and ham will keep you full for hours, as opposed to pancakes with syrup or bowls of cereal.  A big honkin' salad with cheese, nuts, veggies, and balsamic vinaigrette will be a healthier lunch than a sandwich (although possibly less convenient to eat).  Going gluten-free can mean paying a lot to replace all of your familiar foods so you don't have to change the way you eat very much, or it can be a chance to re-evaluate what you put into your face and think about how to eat for maximal health.

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Simplest answer, but you might not like it.  Instead of replacing bread, pancakes, pasta, etc, learn to live without them, or minimal amounts.  Eat meat, eggs, veggies, fruits, cheese, nuts, potatoes, rice - real food.  Look into Paleo and South Beach diets for ways to cut down on grains and starches.  Also saves money over the cost of gluten-free replacements.  The latest studies show no link between dietary saturated fat and heart disease, but there is a link with sugar and carbs.  Two eggs with spinach and ham will keep you full for hours, as opposed to pancakes with syrup or bowls of cereal.  A big honkin' salad with cheese, nuts, veggies, and balsamic vinaigrette will be a healthier lunch than a sandwich (although possibly less convenient to eat).  Going gluten-free can mean paying a lot to replace all of your familiar foods so you don't have to change the way you eat very much, or it can be a chance to re-evaluate what you put into your face and think about how to eat for maximal health.

 

Couldn't have said it better myself!  If you get into gluten free baking, which is basically re-learning everything, you can control what goes in a little better.  I use brown rice pasta (Tinkyada brand) over the white rice and corn pastas.  When I make the pasta I replace half with veggies to cut down on the amount of pasta.  But for the cheaper and healthier meals I just stick to whole foods that are naturally gluten-free, including a lot of lean meats and beans.  I eat grilled chicken, green beans, and sweet potatoes for a meal at least twice a week.  As you get used to being gluten-free and reading labels, you will be in the habit of it anyways and can check out the nutritional content while you are at it.

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Whole Foods are best.  Processed Foods have alot of sugar and "stuff" to make it taste well.  

 

Colleen

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To play devil's advocate here...there are great, healthy brands of bread and other gluten-free stuff out there so it's all about reading the labels.  Canyon Bakehouse San Juan 7 grain bread is incredible and very healthy, nutrition wise.  Baking your own stuff using whole grain flours is another good way to go, as Laura mentioned.  I am not a believer in not eating grains, unless you have allergies to them, because they add variety and taste to your diet and for some of us who don't gain weight easily and lead active lifestyles, not eating grains results in too much weight loss. For kids especially, feeding them all whole foods is just not going to work. They will feel very deprived when out in the real world.

 

To the OP.....the bread I mentioned is awesome and I feed it to the non-gluten free crowd and they love it.  For treats I tend to make my own so I can control the amount of sugar that goes into it, or the type of flour I use.  But King Arthur brand has some fantastic cookie and brownie mixes that are good for that occasional treat.  Not to be eaten on a regular basis but if you exercise or are just active, it isn't going to make you unhealthy by eating them.  Unless you are diabetic, most of the gluten-free brands are OK if you control the amount you eat.

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