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I was wondering if any of you awesome people could help me to find some rice I can eat. I've found myself to be super-sensitive and can't eat most if not all p remade gluten-free products. 20PPM is just to much but I've had success with adding in foods (in moderation) that are certified gluten-free by one or another of the groups who test to 10PPM or less. I'm looking for rice that us tested to this level. Thanks for any help!

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I was wondering if any of you awesome people could help me to find some rice I can eat. I've found myself to be super-sensitive and can't eat most if not all p remade gluten-free products. 20PPM is just to much but I've had success with adding in foods (in moderation) that are certified gluten-free by one or another of the groups who test to 10PPM or less. I'm looking for rice that us tested to this level. Thanks for any help!

 

There is a small rice farm called Cajun Grain that grows only rice, no wheat, rye, barley, etc.  So the rice goes from field to storage to being milled and bagged, and never exposed to other grains.  They said the rice was batch tested, with results showing under 5 ppm.  They don't sell white rice, but the brown jasmine rice is tasty. 

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Just an explanation for people coming to this thread - if a product is tested using a ( less than 20 parts per million) <20 ppm test - that does not mean it has 19 ppm. It could have 1 ppm or 0. It's a bit like saying " I want to spend less than $20,000 on a car". That doesn't mean I have to buy a $19,999 car. Might find a nice $15,000 one.

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I just purchase rice grown in California and never have been glutened by it. I wash my rice three times and steam just the way my Asian friends do.

You are the only gluten-free eater in your family, right? Are they still accidentally glutening you?

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I have a large no-name brand of rice I bought a huge bag of that I'm slowly using up. It's never caused a problem. Once it's gone though I'll start using Lundberg because I prefer the texture.

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In addition to the dedicated facility part, since the FDA came out with their analysis on arsenic in rice products, I tend to favor Lundberg because much of it is grown in California and it's organic.

 

Rice is a good crop to buy organic because it absorbs a lot from the soil. :)

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I use any rice. I am not sure how wheat would get into California rice.

But anyway

http://www.lundberg.com/Products/Special_diets/Glutenfree.asp

California rice is not unique to not being exposed to wheat amongst the rice farms.  A quick search showed last year there were 700,000 acres of wheat in CA, and many farmers farm multiple crops.  That is how the rice gets exposed to other grains, through shared equipment.

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California rice is not unique to not being exposed to wheat amongst the rice farms.  A quick search showed last year there were 700,000 acres of wheat in CA, and many farmers farm multiple crops.  That is how the rice gets exposed to other grains, through shared equipment.

You know what....... Believe what you want. Eat what works for you.

Have you ever seen rice grow? And wheat grow? Might be time we all took a field trip! :)

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You know what....... Believe what you want. Eat what works for you.

Have you ever seen rice grow? And wheat grow? Might be time we all took a field trip! :)

I'm sorry...I don't understand.  I only made the statement about cross-contamination existing in the rice industry because I had read an article on Pubmed talking about it.  I don't think any state is immune to the problem.  Why again am I getting told "believe what I want"??  like I said, I must be missing something here.

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I'm sorry...I don't understand.  I only made the statement about cross-contamination existing in the rice industry because I had read an article on Pubmed talking about it.  I don't think any state is immune to the problem.  Why again am I getting told "believe what I want"??  like I said, I must be missing something here.

 

 

Hi Ksue,

I would love to see the Pub Med article that says there's cross contamination in the rice industry.

Does it mean the entire rice industry? world-wide? USA?

Thanks! :)

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Hi Ksue,

I would love to see the Pub Med article that says there's cross contamination in the rice industry.

Does it mean the entire rice industry? world-wide? USA?

Thanks! :)

Here is the link:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20497786

 

It was done on US products.  It means that even things that are naturally considered gluten free(such as rice, soy, etc.) can still have gluten above the threshold of 20 ppm. So, any grain/bean industry can have cross contamination.  Hope this explains what I was referring to!

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Here is the link:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20497786

 

It was done on US products.  It means that even things that are naturally considered gluten free(such as rice, soy, etc.) can still have gluten above the threshold of 20 ppm. So, any grain/bean industry can have cross contamination.  Hope this explains what I was referring to!

 

I thought you meant this article.  Allow me to share some information..

 

I met Anne Lee, RD who co-authored that study at a gluten-free living conference last month. I read her ENTIRE Pub med article and learned a lot more than what is involved in an abstract.

 

I think you need to look at the bottom line of that article...not just the abstract.  

 

"Grains, seeds and flours analyzed for gluten content in the study. Which ones contained levels of gluten over 20 ppm?

  • millet flour - yes
  • millet grain - yes
  • white rice flour - no
  • rice flour - no
  • Basmati rice - no
  • long grain brown rice - no
  • buckwheat flour - yes
  • hulled buckwheat - no
  • buckwheat groats - no
  • sorghum flour - yes
  • soy flour - yes
  • amaranth flour - no
  • amaranth seed - no
  • flax seed - no
  • enriched corn meal - no
  • instant polenta - no

http://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/glutenfreecookingbasics/a/Researcher-Suggest-Proposed-Fda-gluten-free-Labeling-Guidelines-In-Need-Of-Revision.htm

 

Their conclusion? buy ones (millet, sorghum, buckwheat and soy flour) marked "certified G F"

 

but please note:

 

No mention of rice. Please, read the entire study

 

http://wholelifenutrition.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Gluten-contamination-of-grains-seeds-and-flours-in-the-United-States-a-pilot-study.pdf

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I understand that of all the products tested, 4 were rice/rice flour.  3 of those tested under 5 ppm and one rice flour was 8.5 ppm.  I don't think a small study like this, with 4 rice samples, would by any means mean that rice is always safe and free from gluten.  On the farms, the large equipment used to harvest rice is the same type equipment used to harvest wheat.  If farmers in the area rotate their rice crop with wheat, rye or barley, the equipment is shared, and so are the storage silos.  When the rice is trucked from the farm to the buyer that may bag up and sell rice, that truck could have just dropped off a load of wheat.  When you're talking at levels of PPM, it doesn't take many leftover wheat grains to register.

 

I'm just saying that rice does not get a free ride above soy, corn, or other "inherently" gluten-free grains(or seeds).  The buyer should either see that it is certified gluten-free or talk to the farmer to find out what is really going on down on the farm.  I could assume this is why the FDA is still going to make the rice product claiming gluten-free be tested and certified just like the soy or millet, or any other grains making a gluten-free claim.

 

I originally answered to the poster to try and give some help, but feel I have had sarcasm thrown at me at every turn.

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I understand that of all the products tested, 4 were rice/rice flour.  3 of those tested under 5 ppm and one rice flour was 8.5 ppm.  I don't think a small study like this, with 4 rice samples, would by any means mean that rice is always safe and free from gluten.  On the farms, the large equipment used to harvest rice is the same type equipment used to harvest wheat.  If farmers in the area rotate their rice crop with wheat, rye or barley, the equipment is shared, and so are the storage silos.  When the rice is trucked from the farm to the buyer that may bag up and sell rice, that truck could have just dropped off a load of wheat.  When you're talking at levels of PPM, it doesn't take many leftover wheat grains to register.

 

I'm just saying that rice does not get a free ride above soy, corn, or other "inherently" gluten-free grains(or seeds).  The buyer should either see that it is certified gluten-free or talk to the farmer to find out what is really going on down on the farm.  I could assume this is why the FDA is still going to make the rice product claiming gluten-free be tested and certified just like the soy or millet, or any other grains making a gluten-free claim.

 

I originally answered to the poster to try and give some help, but feel I have had sarcasm thrown at me at every turn.

 

 

?? I did not throw sarcasm at you.

 I am telling you the facts. I am using the same study you did to discuss the conclusions!

You are distorting the information for some reason and honestly, I do not know why.

 

I give up!

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Hey everyone,

thanks for all the info. I know rice isn't usually contaminated I have just found that after eliminating just about everything that wasn't just butchered or pulled out of the ground, I've been recovering. Its awesome especially after a year of not really getting anywhere. I was having a lot of issues with gluten ataxia apart from my usual Celiac-ness. I've successfully used things that were tested to be GIG Certified (although I can't eat too much of it). Considering what even trace amounts of gluten do to me I just figure its better safe than sorry. I emailed Lundberg about their testing methods and if I get a satisfactory answer I will definitely give it a try. I will also post their response.

 

Like I said, I know rice should be fine but its not worth me feeling awful for a few days if it has trace amounts. 

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Thank you! That is very good information! 

 

So, really for millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and soy, I should be looking for the Bob's Red Mill bulk bags. :)

 

To be safe, I go with certified --the big G F in the circle--on those types of alternative grains. 

Lundberg has that certification. it's all they grow, as far as I know.

Both Gemini and I are easily affected by trace gluten CC, and we both use their rice.

No problems and our repeat celiac testing is always fine.

I know she would pipe in here and say this, but she is super busy with work right now. 

 

That's my best advice. 

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To be safe, I go with certified --the big G F in the circle--on those types of alternative grains. 

Lundberg has that certification. it's all they grow, as far as I know.

Both Gemini and I are easily affected by trace gluten CC, and we both use their rice.

No problems and our repeat celiac testing is always fine.

I know she would pipe in here and say this, but she is super busy with work right now. 

 

That's my best advice. 

Thanks Irish, 

I only use certified stuff. The one with the big circle is GIG/GFCO certified. I just couldn't find it on the Lundberg packaging which is what made me come here and look for other options.

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