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Alter Eco has rice certified gluten-free by GIG.  That's what my son and I eat.  We have had problems with other rice.  We are also oat sensitive. 

Good to know. I'm not sure if my local health food store has Alter Eco, definitely worth checking out.

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Thanks Irish, 

I only use certified stuff. The one with the big circle is GIG/GFCO certified. I just couldn't find it on the Lundberg packaging which is what made me come here and look for other options.

 

We use Lundberg in our home too.

 

I don't know how much rice you are consuming, but perhaps if you eat a smaller quantity or cut it for a time and then try it again. 

 

What I'm saying is it simply could be your body is having a hard time with rice (for now).

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For anyone doubting Lundberg's quality control and growing/harvesting/storage procedures, refer to their Farming Practices page and their Food Safety page, which I have provided links to.  If this isn't good enough, then I suggest sticking to a diet of fruits, veggies and protein because this is about as good as it gets!  :)

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Practices.aspx

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Food_Safety_Tour.aspx

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For anyone doubting Lundberg's quality control and growing/harvesting/storage procedures, refer to their Farming Practices page and their Food Safety page, which I have provided links to.  If this isn't good enough, then I suggest sticking to a diet of fruits, veggies and protein because this is about as good as it gets!  :)

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Practices.aspx

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Food_Safety_Tour.aspx

 

amen!  ;)

 

(oh, gosh, though, what about those ducks??????  :D  )

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Awww, it is so nice to know they save the ducklings-to-be instead of mowing them over.  Duck eggs are good eatin', but only when you intend to, lol.

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For anyone doubting Lundberg's quality control and growing/harvesting/storage procedures, refer to their Farming Practices page and their Food Safety page, which I have provided links to.  If this isn't good enough, then I suggest sticking to a diet of fruits, veggies and protein because this is about as good as it gets!  :)

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Practices.aspx

 

http://www.lundberg.com/Commitment/Food_Safety_Tour.aspx

 

They explain about cover crops in that first link: "We've planted Oats & Vetch"

 

That could be the reason for my reaction.  I am oat sensitive.

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They explain about cover crops in that first link: "We've planted Oats & Vetch"

 

That could be the reason for my reaction.  I am oat sensitive.

She wasn't asking about oats. Sorry, but I think that just confuses things.

When I called and talked to them last year, she explained the growing practices , harvesting and processing in detail. But some here didn't believe me, so I am not arguing. Many Celiacs eat Lundberg rice with no gluten issues.

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We use Lundberg in our home too.

 

I don't know how much rice you are consuming, but perhaps if you eat a smaller quantity or cut it for a time and then try it again. 

 

What I'm saying is it simply could be your body is having a hard time with rice (for now).

 

I haven't actually tried adding in any rice yet and I wouldn't plan on consuming much of it. I would just really love to eat some occasionally.

 

I do like Lundberg's No Unhatched Duck Smushing policy!

 

Their response to my questions, I said I would post it.

 

Q:

"Hi, I was wondering if your rice is tested to see if it is gluten free. If so which testing method do you use and to what parts per million is it tested too?

Thanks,"
 
A:
"Dear ,

 

We are not required to test for gluten as our rice mill and packaging facility has no allergens or ingredients present other that rice.  This statement applies to all packaged table rices and rice blends.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us here at the farm.

 

Thank you,"

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She wasn't asking about oats. Sorry, but I think that just confuses things.

When I called and talked to them last year, she explained the growing practices , harvesting and processing in detail. But some here didn't believe me, so I am not arguing. Many Celiacs eat Lundberg rice with no gluten issues.

 

Sorry for the possible confusion.  I had mentioned that I reacted to rice so I wanted to indicate that it could be from oats and not gluten. 

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They explain about cover crops in that first link: "We've planted Oats & Vetch"

 

That could be the reason for my reaction.  I am oat sensitive.

Yes,I read the complete process they use in winter when planting cover crops.  Unless I am missing something here, they incorporate the cover crop into the soil in preparation for planting the rice in spring. So.....and I may be wrong......I think saying you can have a reaction from rice that used oats as a cover crop is a pretty big stretch. In all the 9 years I have been gluten free, I have never seen anything which covers this potential hazard to us published or mentioned in any reputable medical journal or anywhere else that counts, for that matter. This will confuse and instill unnecesary fear in people trying to learn how to navigate this diet. The harvesting and cleaning process is so complete, I don't see how that would be an issue for anyone.

 

I think I will shoot an e-mail off to the Celiac Center at Mass General Hospital or ask my sister to inquire about it as she works at Mass General.  She knows who Dr. Fasano is.

As he is the leading expert in the US on Celiac Disease, I would be very interested to see what they have to say about it.  Not to prove anyone right or wrong but, hopefully, to get some more information on it. I would not want to be doling out incorrect information on here to people learning the diet.  I'll post when I find anything out!

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Yes,I read the complete process they use in winter when planting cover crops.  Unless I am missing something here, they incorporate the cover crop into the soil in preparation for planting the rice in spring. So.....and I may be wrong......I think saying you can have a reaction from rice that used oats as a cover crop is a pretty big stretch. In all the 9 years I have been gluten free, I have never seen anything which covers this potential hazard to us published or mentioned in any reputable medical journal or anywhere else that counts, for that matter. This will confuse and instill unnecesary fear in people trying to learn how to navigate this diet. The harvesting and cleaning process is so complete, I don't see how that would be an issue for anyone.

 

I think I will shoot an e-mail off to the Celiac Center at Mass General Hospital or ask my sister to inquire about it as she works at Mass General.  She knows who Dr. Fasano is.

As he is the leading expert in the US on Celiac Disease, I would be very interested to see what they have to say about it.  Not to prove anyone right or wrong but, hopefully, to get some more information on it. I would not want to be doling out incorrect information on here to people learning the diet.  I'll post when I find anything out!

 

 

Good luck with trying to explain how wheat & oats grow and how rice is completely different.  And how the cover crops are plowed under and often don't even form an actual "oat" seed.  I tried that last year and most people don't believe me or think I made up that I talked to Lundberg in detail.  Its a shame that more people don't see how food is grown.  They have some very odd ideas.  

 

Anyway - oats weren't even the worry.  The fact that wheat isn't grown anywhere near Lundberg farms doesn't seem to help either. Or that they use all their own equipment.  Sigh

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This is the guidelines put out from the FDA about the labeling of gluten-free products.  #15 explains where I was coming from when I answered the original poster about possible "cross-contact" as the FDA puts it, and they explain it pretty much like I explained it.  So, this isn't exactly something I just pulled out of thin air.

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ksue....read what kareng posted.  Maybe she is right and it's just too hard for some people to understand. 

 

You do not refer to the FDA on safe choices for Celiac Disease. Rememeber, these are the people who approve a drug one day and then recall it after people die from it.  You refer to celiac experts.  They do not include this type of cc in their warnings for us because it is not the same thing as a piece of wheat bread rubbing up against a piece of gluten-free bread. It is not the same thing as someone who grows various types of grains and mixes everything in together in the harvesting process vs. someone who grows one item, using dedicated equipment. Not to mention that the processing of the rice is pretty extensive, making it further of a stretch that there would be any gluten in their final product.  I won't even go into what Karen posted because most people won't take the time to learn how things are grown/processed so they can be educated on what is not safe for us and what is not even a remote worry. I am still going to look futher into this from the right place......Celiac Disease experts. Just remember that reactions occur for many other reasons than gluten. In fact, if Lundberg didn't divulge that they use oats as a cover crop, and no one knew this, I'm sure no one would be complaining that they had a reaction to it.   :rolleyes: 

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In my case anyways, the reaction came before any knowledge of cover crops.  The cover crops only provided a possible explanation for the reactions.  Why would we react to one rice and not another?  I suppose it could be a sensitivity to a certain hybrid, but I would think that something else used in the farming process would be more likely.  I grow a lot of my own food at this point and I have long conversations with farmers at markets and on the phone so I am pretty well versed in farming practices.  Why would we react when so many other celiacs don't?  It seems like an oat sensitivity is more likely than an extreme gluten sensitivity in this case.  I really didn't mean to start a whole discussion of whether or not cover crops could cause contamination, but we seem to be here now.  Where do they store the cover crop seeds?  What equipment do they use to sow the cover crop seeds?  How segregated is all that from the rice crops?  Would they worry about that when oats are gluten free?

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