Jump to content
  • Sign Up
kenlove

Researchers Who Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity Have Now Thoroughly Shown That It Doesn't Exist

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I laughed at their final line. I hope that people with real gluten issues don't go and say, "Oh I read an article that said that unless I had confirmed celiac disease, science has confirmed that I can now chow down on the bread!" 

 

That would be a disaster.

 

I hope that this study serves as a springboard for larger studies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some thoughts: 

If you have a real sensitivty to gluten, you would get serious symptoms from eating it.

If you get serious symptoms from eating gluten, would you enroll in a study where you might be fed gluten?

This study would select for people who do not have a real sensitivity to gluten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is 37 people considered a large enough group for a study?

 

And 3 days on one meal plan is enough before *immediately* switching to another?  They barely had time to get the food out of their system!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that it's hilariously funny (in a kind of sad way) that they've said that it's been "thoroughly proven that gluten sensitivity doesn't exist." 

 

A study of 37 people (most of which probably didn't have severe issues if they were willing to be guinea pigs for gluten) is not a thorough proof that an entire medical condition doesn't exist.

 

I have real issues with gluten and I would NEVER sign up for a study like that! Even if they signed a form saying that they would pay my ER bills.  :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it takes weeks of gluten consumption for enough antibodies to be present for celiac testing to work, why would this guy think that nine days would be enough for his study?

I agree that those who do have serious reactions would be MUCH less likely to participate in such a study. I know I wouldn't do it.

It seems to me as if this study has done more harm than good when it comes to learning more about non-celiac reactions to wheat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...