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I get gluten free bread on occasion. Most of the UDI's varieties are egg and dairy free too, which is nice, same with schar. If you like sourdough I like the schar 'deli style bread slices' they look like rye and there's like 5 in a pack, I think they taste like sourdough. I actually noticed that for the past month or so I don't even crave gluteny stuff like bread or pasta anymore. Makes me think that stuff is like crack or something. I don't crave it, but I still eat some gluten free replacement like once a week or so.

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thanks for the replies, going to use wraps I think, gluten seams to be in almost every food. I eat rice krispies every morning and found out that it has barley malt flavouring. trying not to eat gluten is harder than first thought and requires a lot of research. total respect to the people who do this on a daily basis.
:)

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There are gluten-free rice krispies! :)  They are made with brown rice so they have a slightly different flavor, but pretty much the same.  I want to say they are in a tan colored box, I see them at most stores I go to.

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Rice Chex are gluten-free, as are most of their cereal.  I'm struggling with breakfast foods too because I don't really care for eggs and gluten-free waffles, etc. are EXPENSIVE.  Udi's bread is pretty good toasted so if you like that, you could try that--but it's expensive as well.

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Rice Chex are gluten-free, as are most of their cereal.  I'm struggling with breakfast foods too because I don't really care for eggs and gluten-free waffles, etc. are EXPENSIVE.  Udi's bread is pretty good toasted so if you like that, you could try that--but it's expensive as well.

I have been thinking about making my own toaster waffles. I know pancakes are good made and frozen, then toasted, so why not waffles? Waffle irons are fairly inexpensive.

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I have been thinking about making my own toaster waffles. I know pancakes are good made and frozen, then toasted, so why not waffles? Waffle irons are fairly inexpensive.

 

I always make extra pancakes and waffles (when I made those) and froze them.  Not sure if they hold up well using gluten-free ingredients but I don't see why they would not.  One time I started making waffles and discovered I was out of milk, so I substituted orange juice==very tasty!!  I don't have a waffle iron any longer but I might need to get one now again.

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I make waffles a lot. It's really easy! :) I make whole grain oat ones usually.

 

Because we like waffles so much, we invested in this heavy duty waffle iron. It was well worth the investment and does things much faster. It cooks in about half the time as a cheap waffle iron and you can make two at a time as well.

 

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/waring-pro-reg-pro-double-belgian-waffle-maker/1017628135

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I can't have oats for a year so that makes it harder.  I went to buy some flour today and just about had a heart attack at the $15/bag for a 2 lb bag  :o .  I'll have to look around.  They didn't have any gluten-free bisquick at our store so I'll have to check the other store.  Hubs won't be doing much baking at $15/bag though YIKES!!!

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I can't have oats for a year so that makes it harder.  I went to buy some flour today and just about had a heart attack at the $15/bag for a 2 lb bag  :o .  I'll have to look around.  They didn't have any gluten-free bisquick at our store so I'll have to check the other store.  Hubs won't be doing much baking at $15/bag though YIKES!!!

 

I pay $13 for 5 pounds of an AP flour at Costco. At that price the $55 a year membership quite quickly pays for itself. Especially with all the other stuff they sell there I can get great deals on. If I hadn't found this flour I would still be doing exclusively what I had been before, which I still do for a significant number of recipes. I use exactly what flours they call for. There really is no need to buy some expensive premade blend when you can buy the individual flours for a fraction of the price and simply use them as needed in recipes.

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No, not in a high COL area, but it's a smaller store.  This was an AP flour, Cup 4 Cup.  They had smaller bags of various other flours too.  We have another store I can check to see if they have a better deal.  We have a Costco membership but it's 45 minutes away so I haven't looked there yet.  Even at $13 for 5 lbs, YIKES!!  5 lbs of regular flour is about $2.

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At $13 for 5 pounds that's only $2.60 a pound. While sure, it is far more expensive than "regular" flour I guess I honestly wouldn't know the price if you didn't just tell me. For me, this is regular flour, wheat flour is poison and the fact that it exists at all at this point barely even registers as a blip in my world. I compare the price to other flours I can eat, and it is about the same price, or even cheaper than many other individual flours. Our reality is different, and I've long since learned that comparing my prices to wheat prices isn't going to do anything for me so I stopped so long ago that I forgot I ever did it.

 

I guess my point is, for us it's a simple fact that baking, and baked goods like bread are more expensive. I just look for the best deal and snag it when I can. A good deal is a good deal. Comparing my gluten free good deal to what the 99% pay isn't helpful so why go there?

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Im working on making my own cup for cup flour with some actual nutrition. Im hoping to make some freezer waffles or pancakes when I finally decide how I want to make my flour.

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At $13 for 5 pounds that's only $2.60 a pound. While sure, it is far more expensive than "regular" flour I guess I honestly wouldn't know the price if you didn't just tell me. For me, this is regular flour, wheat flour is poison and the fact that it exists at all at this point barely even registers as a blip in my world. I compare the price to other flours I can eat, and it is about the same price, or even cheaper than many other individual flours. Our reality is different, and I've long since learned that comparing my prices to wheat prices isn't going to do anything for me so I stopped so long ago that I forgot I ever did it.

 

I guess my point is, for us it's a simple fact that baking, and baked goods like bread are more expensive. I just look for the best deal and snag it when I can. A good deal is a good deal. Comparing my gluten free good deal to what the 99% pay isn't helpful so why go there?

 

Just commenting on the price difference....and I guess if you just accept that gluten-free flour and food has to be 1000+% more than the gluten counterparts....prices are not going to change.

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Just commenting on the price difference....and I guess if you just accept that gluten-free flour and food has to be 1000+% more than the gluten counterparts....prices are not going to change.

 

It just takes a long while to get used to the sticker shock.  After time passes and you no longer stop to stare at the gluteny foods, it will be a little less painful.  I will say that the cup4cup flour brand is usually the most expensive option I see out there, but lower demand things like gluten-free flour that need special handling and testing are just going to be more pricey.

 

Im working on making my own cup for cup flour with some actual nutrition. Im hoping to make some freezer waffles or pancakes when I finally decide how I want to make my flour.

 

If you are going to do a lot of baking, check out the Americas Test Kitchen does gluten-free cookbook. They have a nice flour blend recipe in there, and give some really great explanations and tips on substitutions and such. Making your own flour may not realistically turn out to be a cup for cup kind of thing, but once you get familiar with a flour blend you will know how to adjust recipes.  Measuring by weight usually gives you the best results. 

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It just takes a long while to get used to the sticker shock.  After time passes and you no longer stop to stare at the gluteny foods, it will be a little less painful.  I will say that the cup4cup flour brand is usually the most expensive option I see out there, but lower demand things like gluten-free flour that need special handling and testing are just going to be more pricey.

 

 

I only just saw that brand on shelves here for the first time a few weeks ago. I actually laughed out loud when I saw the price. I thought to myself that someone as got to be kidding if they think someone is going to pay that with all the other options that are far more reasonably priced. Once I realized that there were so many factors impacting my price (dedicated facility, testing, sometimes imported things) besides the fact that it plain old isn't just literally miles and miles of wheat all across the midwest I accepted that there is literally no possible way our prices will ever be as low as the prices of wheat. It's a simple fact. But I consider buying a flour at $13 for 5 pounds a far better way to vote with my dollar than a 2 pound bag for $15.

 

If you want to make your own waffles, the ATK book does have a recipe that looks awesome. There are also lots of great recipes online you can look up. You'll find some about as nutritional as licking your walls and some far better. The beauty of looking them up this way though is that you'll find most of them have reviews in the comments and you can see what other people think of the recipe and can decide if it's worth it or not. It will be far less of an investment than trying and failing repeatedly with your own blend. Not that there is anything wrong with that, it can simply get expensive. Also, sometimes you just want a waffle now... not when things eventually work out.

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.... You'll find some about as nutritional as licking your walls...

I like my waffles to taste like the schnozberries on the wall!

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The other option if you want really cheap gluten free flour is grind it yourself. Being that you can get brown or white rice for $0.50 to $1 a pound, you can make really cheap rice flour. Whole millet (even if it's certified organic and gluten free) is fair cheaper than premade millet flour. 

 

That's what I do for my bread recipe, anything that can be ground myself gets home ground and I only really buy the stuff like starch flours and almond meal. 

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