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RainKitty

Gluten-Free For The Entire Famly? When Members Can't/don't Want To Be Gluten-Free

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I have a 9 year old and a 13 year old.  And a 45 year old (husband).  I have my own cutting board (different color) and wash all pots and pans again before using them (I actually did this before dx - like them to be freshly clean).  Kids know to spoon things onto their plate before using/spreading them.  I do have my own butter, soy sauce, etc.  Also kids know to wash their hands before reaching into shared snacks (good hygeine anyway).

 

I confess I do make them sandwiches for their lunches, on their cutting board, and I wash my hands afterwards.  I don't think I've gotten any gluten this way, but I can't say for sure.  It's the only way I can be sure they get a decent lunch.

 

We sometimes slip up, but I think I've caught any potential problems before getting glutened.  Except once when I cleaned up their pizza crumbs/dust, and once when my husband kissed me after eating pizza!

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Hi-

   I think the thing to figure out is what works best for your family. The first thing I did when I was diagnosed was to clean the whole house of gluten, wheat, barley, rye & oats. Then I realized that my boyfriend really does enjoy taking 4 PBJ sandwiches in his lunch bucket and that is a whole loaf of gluten-free bread ($6.50 not in the budget)...

 

So, he is just banished to his own table to make his sandwiches and he has his own jar of peanut butter and jelly he can dip in. Other than that our house is gluten-free and I cook strictly gluten-free...threw away all the old non stick pans, plastic serving spatula, toaster etc...   However, we do have separate sponges in case he wipes his crumbs down. This works for us...he's happy because I cook all the time and I am happy because I am not getting contaminated.  My daughter eats whatever is put in front of her and loves my whole cooking.

 

Best of luck to you with this new change...trial and error here!

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Thanks for your thoughts on a shared kitchen. It's crazy just how sensitive I am with being new to gluten-free. This weekend we had a birthday party which was all gluten-free (I found great cupcake recipes) except for beer. I must have gotten a drop in my food because I got sick (not bad though). I tossed all my old plastic and silicone kitchen ware and that seems to have helped a lot. I feel like the going gluten-free process is like unpeeling an onion. Every month I figure out one more layer that needs to come off!

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I've gone back to a gluten free kitchen now that my daughter's gluten challenge is done and boy, is it ever a stress reliever! 

 

Here's some pointers on cooking gluten free for a whole family, when only one person needs to be gluten free. I'm the only G.F. person in my house at present.

 

First of all, focus on basics. Nuts, fruits, veggies, eggs, dried beans, plain soy products, plain meats, etc.

 

For grains, find some basic versatile inexpensive grain/starch options that everybody enjoys. White basmati rice (we buy in a 20 lb bag at Sam's Club for $21), white rice noodles, corn pasta, corn/quinoa pasta, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and gluten free rolled oats (we buy them in bulk for $1.63 a pound) are popular choices in our house. The corn pasta is available at Aldi for $1.29 a pound or at our regular grocery for $1.99 a pound. 

 

Focus on basic meals that are easy to make gluten free. A favorite at our house is stir fry. We love the certified G.F. San-J options for sauces and soy sauce. Other crowd pleasing options are really easy to make gluten free, like tater tot casserole. Scrambled eggs and oven roasted potatoes is a favorite breakfast. My gluten eaters and I also regularly eat homemade whole grain gluten free waffles. (super easy to whip up!)

 

Bread is probably too expensive to make the center of your diet, but you don't necessarily have to go without, either. I have a scratch made recipe that pleases my gluten eaters or I whip up a loaf of Pamela's bread mix. Pamela's bread mix also makes great bagels. 

 

For treats, gluten free baking is pretty easy to figure out and often you can make treats that can't be distinguished from their glutenous counterparts. There are also many gluten free premade options like ice cream, fruit sorbet, popsicles, potato chips, etc.

 

I've also had good luck buying gluten free foods for cheaper at our Amish salvage stores.

 

Keep in mind that you're not actually telling anybody that they must go gluten free, but only that they need to eat their gluten at restaurants, friends' houses, potlucks, etc. instead of home.


~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I don't really understand clearly what happens when you become "contaminated" in the kitchen, is the Gluten a tiny tiny crumb that once ingested makes you ill? what exactly does it looks like?  And if you become ill from it what are your symptoms, and are they immediate?

 

I hope someone can explain this to me as I have been giving my dog bread and butter for his supper every night without much thought.


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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Yes, for a celiac (or any other person with a medical issue around gluten, such as gluten ataxia or non-celiac gluten sensitivity), even crumbs can make you sick.

 

For me, it's nearly impossible to keep my kids from contaminating me, so it's easier to keep a gluten free house for all and let them get their gluten elsewhere.

 

If you have more questions, there is a newbie 101 thread in the Coping With Celiac Disease section that has more info on cross contamination and avoiding it.


~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I don't really understand clearly what happens when you become "contaminated" in the kitchen, is the Gluten a tiny tiny crumb that once ingested makes you ill? what exactly does it looks like? And if you become ill from it what are your symptoms, and are they immediate?

I hope someone can explain this to me as I have been giving my dog bread and butter for his supper every night without much thought.

That tiny amount can make you sick in hours or days and last for a week or more. It triggers an autoimmune response that causes your body to attack your small intestines. You might be asymptomatic and not realize the damage you are causing. Before i was diagnosed, I was anemic but just thought I was tired due to my age and menopause. I had osteoporosis that was not diagnosed until after my fractures (within 3 months of my celiac disease diagnosis).

My dog is on grain free dog food. I do not allow gluten in the house. It makes it easier on my husband and me. My kid can get her gluten fix outside the house.

I do not want any more fractures and I do not want to develop anymore autoimmune disorders. I avoid gluten as if it were poison (and it is for me and my husband).


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

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Yes, very good explaination cyclinglady.

 

My cat is on grain free food and my two goldfish would be too, if I could find any standard goldfish food that was gluten free.

 

I've had a TIA in the past (ministroke) due to gluten and more recently had a relapse of some neuro symptoms (dehabilitating headaches and trouble talking correctly) after my kids were eating gluten in the house. For me, it's a matter of staying alive and not risking getting disabled.


~Ruth

Gluten free since 2/14/2010 after suffering a rare and serious complication from my gluten challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Celiac's is like becomming an incredible Investigator and the case is your health. Unfortunately, the labeling laws make it almost impossible to figure out if something contains gluten or not.

 

It took me months to realize that I had to change the dog food. It contaminated me. I threw out all the non-stick pans and plastic spatula's...they had gluten baked in. 

 

...just a crumb...that's all it takes.

 

6 months gluten-free yesterday.

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Thank you everyone for your help..I will go look at the newbie thread on cross contamination as well..


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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it's just hubby and me here, but kids and grandkids come over alot. my house is gluten free. that's it. this is where I feel safe. when my family comes over we eat, we bbq, no one suffers. they don't need gluten that badly. if they lived here, it would be the same. I make no apology, I have to know this is the one place where I don't worry. 

 

hubby is free to eat what he wants out. it works. 


gluten free since 11/12  

dairy and soy free since 1/13

chocolate free since 6/14

 

I miss my chocolate!!!   but I'm not sick anymore, and that's what really matters  :)

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