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JodyM75

Annoyed - "modern Bread Rising Methods Cause Gluten Issues"

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So, I was just at a family gathering and got an earfull, and I was wondering if anyone else had heard this one before.

 

I got into a conversation with a cousin (2nd cousin or so) about having celiac.  He told me one of his sons also can't have gluten, although he didn't say if it was celiac, allergy, etc. 

 

He then told me his theory that the modern way they make bread rise - by using chemicals rather than yeast - is part of the cause behind so many gluten issues today.  I mean, (he said), there has to be a connection, right?  They used to use yeast, they don't anymore, and now more and more people have problems with gluten.

 

I know this is bunk, but I was wondering if anyone had heard this theory before. 

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Bunk. Commercial bakers still use yeast to make bread rise. There are lots of additives added, but those are added to lots of processed foods to yield better, more palatable results, not to mention a longer shelf life.

Autoimmune diseases seems to be on the rise, but is it environmental or just a case of being able to identify disease better? In the "olden" days, Aunt Heddy died of a "wasting disease" which could have been attributed to a number of diseases. Who knows? Scientists have many theories but few have been proven.

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There is some thought that modern bread has a higher gluten content.  They add extra of the "gluten" component of wheat to the flour for higher rising, spongyer bread.  The wheat isn't higher gluten - the flour mixture is.  It can still be labelled as "flour" because that is what it is.  (a bit like why 2 different corn flakes could have more sugar and the same ingredient list - one has more sugar).

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right??!!  what did 'the consumption' ever turn out to be?   <_<

tuberculosis

 

I agree-I think better diagnosis is the root behind the "increase".  Like most diseases and conditions, often in the past it went undiagnosed or lumped into a general category.  Also keep in mind that people didn't live as long so many diseases/conditions just didn't appear or were not as severe as to be noticed.  100 years ago I probably wouldn't have been diagnosed with Celiac because I probably would have been dead before my symptoms became bothersome.

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I agree-I think better diagnosis is the root behind the "increase".  Like most diseases and conditions, often in the past it went undiagnosed or lumped into a general category.  Also keep in mind that people didn't live as long so many diseases/conditions just didn't appear or were not as severe as to be noticed.  100 years ago I probably wouldn't have been diagnosed with Celiac because I probably would have been dead before my symptoms became bothersome.

 

I agree about the increase and the longer life span, too.  I also think women are more likely to be diagnosed with AI diseases because...women go to the doctor more? 

 

I didn't know that about modern bread flours having more gluten in them, that's interesting.  I did know modern bakers still use yeast (that was the main thing that told me this guy didn't know what he was talking about).

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There is some thought that modern bread has a higher gluten content.  They add extra of the "gluten" component of wheat to the flour for higher rising, spongyer bread.  The wheat isn't higher gluten - the flour mixture is.  It can still be labelled as "flour" because that is what it is.  (a bit like why 2 different corn flakes could have more sugar and the same ingredient list - one has more sugar).

Karen is right. I forgot that I is used to add more gluten to my bread. Later, I gave it up because I realized that my grandma never needed it and my results were always good without the additive.

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Karen is right. I forgot that I is used to add more gluten to my bread. Later, I gave it up because I realized that my grandma never needed it and my results were always good without the additive.

 

 

I am trying to find a link for it but I heard it, originally at ICDS last year.  And some varieties of wheat have more gluten than others and are used differently - some for baking flour, some for all purpose flour, etc.

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According to my endo ( but he is a doctor so who knows how right he is ) pregnancy causes a lot of chemistry changes in the body leaving women more prone to autoimmune issues. Shortly after having my first child I developed a lot of drug and environmental allergies and Grave's. But, until men start having babies there is no way to prove that theory.

I don't think there are higher incidences of these disease, just more awareness and education about them.

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