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MrDurden

New To Gluten Free, Not Sure What I Am Allowed To Eat

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Hi everyone, I started being gluten free a few days ago as I have all of the symptoms of someone with gluten sensitivity and would like to see if all of my symptoms improve on a gluten free diet. Obviously I know to stay away from gluten based products such as bread, pasta etc. and products that may contain gluten based ingredients such as sauces or  chocolate, but I was wondering where people stand on products that do not contain gluten ingredients such as wheat but are not labelled as gluten free. I am confused as to whether or not I should be eating these.

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Welcome. If possible you should be tested for celiac before you go gluten free. If you later decide you want to be tested you would have to go back on gluten for anywhere from a couple weeks to a couple months. That can be hard if you are celiac because at times reactions are stronger after we have been gluten free and the antibodies have calmed down. 

Do read the Newbie thread at the top of the Coping section as it will have a lot of good info for you.

You do need to avoid wheat, rye, barley (malt) and oats. I do consume foods that are not labeled gluten free but I read the labels very carefully before I do. 


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Thanks for the advice. I am going to remain gluten free until Christmas and then try gluten again to see if I have a bad reaction to it. If I do then I will know that I am gluten intollerant. I am reading the labels of pretty much everything I am eating now, I am looking out for ingrediants like wheat, barley, oats, rye etc. but am not sure what else to look out for. Im sure a quick google search will give me the answer though.

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Also, it is easier on both you and your gut if you stick to whole foods at first. Things like meat and potatoes and fresh veggies and fruit. You don't have to worry about reading the ingredients labels because there aren't any, and these things are easier to digest than processed food.

 

And be prepared for gluten withdrawal. You may get headaches and mood swings and an almost dizzy feeling for a week or two. That is perfectly normal and once you're over it you will most likely start feeling better than you have in a long time.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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You are  correct staying  away  from  any of the  wheat  family, rye, barley...Being  wheat free  is not the  same  as  being  gluten free...gluten  lurks  in  almost  every  thing! marinades, sauces,  coatings,  soy  sauce,  beer  &  so  much  more..

I agree  that  you should  stick to a  whole foods  plan... Stay away from  processed  foods  gluten free  ones  too... Eat  healthy  live  foods...

Many  of  us  eat gluten-free  foods that  are   not  made  in a dedicated  facility , others  who  are  very sensitive  can not  risk  that ...

I also  suggest  celiac  testing  even if  has been  done  in the  past, things  can change from year to year....

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I eat lots of things that do not say "Gluten-Free" on the label. I read ingredients, and know that most major food manufacturers (including Kraft, General Mills, Unilever and ConAgra, among others) will clearly disclose known gluten sources in the ingredients list. I am in my fifteenth year gluten-free, and this has worked for me. Label rules have improved since 2000, so you may be more comfortable with a lesser-known company than I was back then.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Thanks for the advice. I am going to remain gluten free until Christmas and then try gluten again to see if I have a bad reaction to it. If I do then I will know that I am gluten intollerant. I am reading the labels of pretty much everything I am eating now, I am looking out for ingrediants like wheat, barley, oats, rye etc. but am not sure what else to look out for. Im sure a quick google search will give me the answer though.

 

Keep in mind that if you do decide to test for celiac disease, you will need to complete a gluten challenge consisting of the equivalent of 1-2 slices of bread per day for 2-3 months before you can accurately get tested.  That's why it is often a good idea to get tested for celiac disease before going gluten-free - reintroducing gluten into your life (if it gives you obvious symptoms) for three months is a painful and miserable experience.  You might save yourself a lot of discomfort by getting tested for celiac disease now, and then if it is negative you can try the gluten-free diet and then reintroduce gluten later (if you want).

 

Best wishes in whatever you decide.  :)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Also, it is easier on both you and your gut if you stick to whole foods at first. Things like meat and potatoes and fresh veggies and fruit. You don't have to worry about reading the ingredients labels because there aren't any, and these things are easier to digest than processed food.

 

And be prepared for gluten withdrawal. You may get headaches and mood swings and an almost dizzy feeling for a week or two. That is perfectly normal and once you're over it you will most likely start feeling better than you have in a long time.

 

Five days into being gluten free and I actually feel more fatigued than I did before, I am tired all day and have brain fog and terrible flatulence. I have had these symptoms for quite some time now but they seem to be worse now. I am hoping this will pass soon.

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That is gluten withdrawal. Give it another week or so and you'll feel better.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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Oh yes, withdrawal is horrible. I too felt much worse for the first couple of weeks... doesn't seem fair or right, does it?  LOL


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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How long did it take you to feel better?

Honestly, I think it differs for everyone. I have heard people say they felt better after two weeks, I've heard two months. As for me, I think it takes longer every time I break my diet. (Hard headed in-laws that don't understand, no matter how hard you explain celiac are the worst!)

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Honestly, I think it differs for everyone. I have heard people say they felt better after two weeks, I've heard two months. As for me, I think it takes longer every time I break my diet. (Hard headed in-laws that don't understand, no matter how hard you explain celiac are the worst!)

 

Welcome to the forum, Aria! :)

I strongly urge you to keep strictly to a gluten-free diet if you have Celiac disease.  If your in-laws are hard headed and coerce you into eating gluten, it is a good idea to remove yourself from the situation and not do that.  Cheating on a gluten-free diet will make people not take you seriously in the long run, and most importantly, can lead to things like cancer.  The payoff of peace now is not worth the long-term health risk.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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