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New Rules In The Uk

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I heard this on the BBC News this morning. Restaurants in the UK must now identify any and all of 15 allergens on their menus. (I hope this idea spreads to the US!)

 

The comments after the article are a bit distressing but then again, as celiacs, we are used to nasty comments from ignorant people. :angry:

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30395142


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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I saw that.  I think it is great.  Not all restaurants have competent staff who get it right when you ask.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

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I think this is great but honestly?  The UK are heads and tails above the US with their knowledge of food in general, when dining out, and already offer many more options than we see here in the US.  Every time I go there, it gets better and better.  This past trip in October I found that Starbucks offers delicious gluten-free sandwich wraps, all pre-packaged to avoid cc.  The company that makes the wraps is Warburtons and they put the wraps here in the States to shame.  Soft and delicious and whole grainy they were and after having 3 of these sandwiches over a 2 week period there, not a hint of sickness was to be felt and you all know I am very, very sensitive.  Everything, I thought, was already clearly marked.

 

Nero's, another coffee chain (my favorite) offered up a chicken salad sandwich on a gluten-free roll, which I think was from Warburtons.  Absolutely soft and delicious and I am missing my great gluten-free bread now that I am back at home.  All of these items were pre-packaged and I never had a hint of sickness from anything I ate that was pre-made.

This is the link to their site so you can see their products.  If shipping wasn't so damn expensive, I would order a case load!

http://www.newburnbakehouse.com/supermarket-products

 

I also ate out for dinner for 2 weeks and never got sick.....in fact, I felt better than I do when I eat here at home. The food seems fresher and the amount of small farms in Britain is probably the reason for that.  I also found that, especially in the French restaurants, there was a much higher knowledge of food and what is in the food served.  That seemed a no brainer to me as the French are masters of food.  Even the young waitstaff knew what was in the food I asked about, which is not common here in the States.  Makes me wonder what the hell they are teaching kids in school today.

 

Liability laws are different in Britain than they are here in the States so that is one of the reasons we do not have the same variety of offerings. If people weren't so sue happy here, things would change but that won't happen any time soon.  Such a shame.

 

I think the new labeling laws are good but if you want to travel to Britain, you can be assured that the labeling offered now is pretty good and you can dine out at many places that will not make you sick. They seem to take celiac more seriously, at least from my perspective and experience.

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My only fear would be that ingredients that should be listed as gluten-free (like a steak and baked potato) may be listed as containing gluten to cover their butts because of the possibility of cross contamination. As long as restaurants aren't over reacting and trying to cover their butts legally, that law would be a real benefit, as Gemini pointed out.

 

If I ever get to Britain, I probably won't be able to afford the luxury of food anyways.  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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This is potentially very good news.   The other day I went into the tiniest independently owned cafe in my home town and the cafe owner produced a file of ingredients.   She had simply photocopied the label of the chocolate powder that she was using in the hot chocolate but this was so helpful.    I went to Ikea in Southampton and again found a very helpful cashier who despite long queues rushed off to find out what ingredients were in the meatballs and salad.   Both had gluten, but no matter, at least I knew not to order either.  

 

I would advise caution though because this rule is not yet quite in place as far as I can make out (I think it takes effect next year) and when I asked a barista last Saturday if the hot chocolate they were selling in a London railway station contained gluten she said, 'Oh no, just steam and milk!'  She was so busy I wasn't sure she would have wanted to find the ingredients list so I took her word for it.  Took a gulp on the train and it tasted of malt.  Got home and checked the website and it said it wasn't gluten free.   I think it will make a big difference once it is fully enforced, though.

 

Edit:  sorry, reading the article I see this comes into force this Saturday.  So it looks as if I went to London a week too early!   It will be interesting to see what happens - hope some other Brits will report back!


Diagnosed by blood test and endoscopy Spring 2013

Adopted a gluten-free diet in May 2013

 

BRITISH

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I think this is great but honestly?  The UK are heads and tails above the US with their knowledge of food in general, when dining out, and already offer many more options than we see here in the US.  Every time I go there, it gets better and better.  This past trip in October I found that Starbucks offers delicious gluten-free sandwich wraps, all pre-packaged to avoid cc.  The company that makes the wraps is Warburtons and they put the wraps here in the States to shame.  Soft and delicious and whole grainy they were and after having 3 of these sandwiches over a 2 week period there, not a hint of sickness was to be felt and you all know I am very, very sensitive.  Everything, I thought, was already clearly marked.

 

Nero's, another coffee chain (my favorite) offered up a chicken salad sandwich on a gluten-free roll, which I think was from Warburtons.  Absolutely soft and delicious and I am missing my great gluten-free bread now that I am back at home.  All of these items were pre-packaged and I never had a hint of sickness from anything I ate that was pre-made.

This is the link to their site so you can see their products.  If shipping wasn't so damn expensive, I would order a case load!

http://www.newburnbakehouse.com/supermarket-products

 

I also ate out for dinner for 2 weeks and never got sick.....in fact, I felt better than I do when I eat here at home. The food seems fresher and the amount of small farms in Britain is probably the reason for that.  I also found that, especially in the French restaurants, there was a much higher knowledge of food and what is in the food served.  That seemed a no brainer to me as the French are masters of food.  Even the young waitstaff knew what was in the food I asked about, which is not common here in the States.  Makes me wonder what the hell they are teaching kids in school today.

 

Liability laws are different in Britain than they are here in the States so that is one of the reasons we do not have the same variety of offerings. If people weren't so sue happy here, things would change but that won't happen any time soon.  Such a shame.

 

I think the new labeling laws are good but if you want to travel to Britain, you can be assured that the labeling offered now is pretty good and you can dine out at many places that will not make you sick. They seem to take celiac more seriously, at least from my perspective and experience.

 

 

Gemini - also wanted to thank you for being so nice about British food.  Having lived abroad, including France, I know we haven't had the best reputation for restaurant food in the past.  But I truly think that things have improved immensely in the last 20 years - it is still possible to have a bad meal,of course, but that is possible anywhere!  Thanks again!   


Diagnosed by blood test and endoscopy Spring 2013

Adopted a gluten-free diet in May 2013

 

BRITISH

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Gemini - also wanted to thank you for being so nice about British food.  Having lived abroad, including France, I know we haven't had the best reputation for restaurant food in the past.  But I truly think that things have improved immensely in the last 20 years - it is still possible to have a bad meal,of course, but that is possible anywhere!  Thanks again!   

I would say that you are 100% correct, cristiana!  I have been traveling to Britain for the past 20 years and the food quality and restaurant scene have exploded in the past 10 years, with offerings of all sorts of cuisine from around the world.  But even the most basic British classic meal, such as fish and chips or the ever popular Sunday roast, has been upgraded to a healthier version, all the while improving the taste and quality.  We like to throw the term "upscale" around a lot but that's exactly it. I think having input from other cultures has a positive impact too.  Being a chef is no longer just being a cook.  People are encouraged to show their talent and flair with food and the public has benefited from this in big ways!  And, yes, people are always surprised when I tell them how good the food is in Britain these days but you know how people are. The only people who are going to notice that are Celiac's or anyone with a food issue or those who make food a big part of their vacation experience.  Hands down......you have the BEST gluten-free bread I have tasted so far, in 10 years gluten free!

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