Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:

allergiescooked

Chef That Wants Your Feedback

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hello All! I'm a professional chef looking to mend the disconnect felt by many of the celiac/gluten-free community when dealing with my industry. I am oozing with cooking tips, recipes, etc... but I want to hear from you. It's one thing to cook it, it's another thing to live with it...

 

What are your biggest food frustrations? (Not just dining out, at home too)

 

Do you feel that there are enough good food options out there? Anything you'd wish there was more of?

 

What are your biggest cravings? Have you found solutions/good substitutions? If not, what would you like to see?

 

feel free to ask me questions too :)

 

Chef Patterson

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canollis.  I really miss those lovely Italian treats.

 

Phyllo dough creations.  spinach pie

 

Gyros, like Olga's kitchen.

 

If you offer a dish like Taboleh (a regional dish with some type of added wheat) saying it's gluten free, you better tell me how you replaced the wheat/gluten.  What has been done to reduce cross/contamination ~the fact that you mentioned it is reassuring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My at-home frustration is the ridiculous cost of good gluten-free flour blends. I love Better Batter flour blend but it is absurdly expensive. As far as eating out goes... we don't go. I'll eat at PF Changs and Outback Steak House on very rare occasions ... with trepidation as wait staff and managers can be as awesome as ever but behind the kitchen closed doors... all bets are off, but we live in pretty rural Arkansas. We don't eat out here. I make bread mixes like Pamela's (I like Udi's and Rudi's ready-made bread but am so unhappy with loaves of bread... that cost an arm and a leg... w/ a huge air bubble that goes thru the entire loaf!!

 

I'm not a fan of gluten-free convenience foods but would like to continue baking from a "from scratch" perspective without having to mortgage the house for the ingredients!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree - the biggest frustration is the cost of gluten-free foods. I eat mostly naturally gluten-free foods but I do like gluten-free breads. Somewhere around here is a thread I started last week about that. I am now paying $7.41 for a loaf of Udi's. I can get six SMALL sandwiches out of that. (The heels are usually so small I can't make a sandwich out of them so I make bread crumbs out of them.)

 

I rarely eat out. The nearest place I know for sure is safe is an hour away.

 

I also get frustrated when I see "gluten-free" items at a bake sale!!! I always question the maker and invariably these things are so full of cross contamination I have warned the bakers that they should add to the label, "not safe for persons with celiac disease".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bartfull do you have a Costco near  you? they carry  the  restaurant  size  loaf  of  the  gluten-free  Udi's....it  is  like  a  large  loaf  of  wide  deli bread.....first  time  I made a whole  sandwich  with it  I was  stuffed  after  being used to the  1/2  size  piece  of  bread!  I call  this  larger  size  the  he-man  size! great  for  grilled  sandwiches...It  is  $7.49  at  our  Costco....double  the  size  of  the  Udi's  one  can get  at  the  grocery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biscuits, I crave biscuits, baking powder biscuits. Ones that don't taste like beans or like birdseed (millet) or like brown rice. Ones that don't leave a bad aftertaste. My hubs would like ones that don't taste like nuts (almond flour). I made my own biscuits from the time I was around 13 (will be 58 in a week) and I have been unable to get anywhere close since being gluten free 3 years ago. 

As far as all baked goods go, I don't know why most of them have to use so much brown rice. Just because we're celiac does not mean that we ALL like brown rice in whatever form. 

I would love bread that does not have to be toasted. I would adore eating a banana sammich on UN toasted bread. 

I wish there were more breakfast foods out there. Pastries. Bear claws, coffee cakes, strudels, biscuits (repeating myself). Have I said I would love some biscuits? :D  :D If there were biscuits that held together one could have a ham, egg & cheese biscuit, or a sausage & egg biscuit, or spread jam or honey on a biscuit, dip biscuits in syrup, have a buttered biscuit or cheese biscuits. I could go on & on but will try to restrain myself. ;-)

 

I agree with mommida ~~~ phyllo dough would be a major boon!

 

I would love to see good, quality, frozen entrees out there that were made up of naturally gluten free foods so that I could have a meal or two off from cooking, cooking, cooking. So that we could go somewhere & not have to "get home in time to cook" lunch or dinner & we could just nuke something fast. 

 

We dare not eat out. We both have the celiac rash & it can (& does with many) take years to resolve even after going gluten free. The antibodies get deposited under the skin you see & you will have the "rash" (a paltry word for it) until those antibodies dissipate. We can't take the chance of getting cross contaminated & thus doing penance for months to years for the pleasure of eating out 1 time. 

 

Thank you Chef Patterson for asking, for reaching out to connect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biggest frustration is just not having anywhere to go out to eat that I can trust 100%.  Ok, Red Robin is good, but it's burgers and french fries.  There is a restaurant in MN that is gluten-free (and gluten food) but the owner is Celiac and her staff is supremely trained.  They have a HUGE menu with unique foods that are amazing.  I REALLY wish she would open a restaurant in my town :D.  Even restaurants here that say they are gluten-free, the staff is so poorly trained that you just can't eat there.

 

I would love a restaurant that has a good sized menu, has daily specials or changes the menu enough that you can eat there frequently without feeling like you are eating the same thing over and over.  It would just be nice to eat food someone else made and know it's safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas Road house in my town has gluten-free options.  I've eaten there 3 times now and been fine.

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/12588-texas-roadhouse/

http://www.texasroadhouse.com/

 

Hi Chef Patterson.

 

One of the problems with gluten-free food IMHO is that companies making it seem to consider gluten as the only possible problem.  Many celiacs have additional food intolerances that develop because of the ongoing gut irritation by the auto-immune response over years of misdiagnosis.  But few gluten-free food companies consider those.  Soy and dairy  are a couple of the problems.  But if you look at gluten-free foods on the store shelves they often have soy and or dairy in them.  Enjoy Life Foods is one exception to that trend.  They do make some allergen friendly foods.  So it's common for some of us to see gluten-free foods listed for sale that we can't eat because they have some other ingredient that will make us sick.

 

Restaurants have the same issue on their menus.  Often enuff they have a gluten-free menu but it doesn't list the other ingredients that might make some one sick.  It's almost seems like cooking schools have never heard of the top 8 food allergies list or don't teach people about it.  Celiac disease isn't an allergy but people do develop food intolerances to many of the foods that cause allergies.   You may notice some members have a signature below their posts listing their food issues.

 

So it seems to me cooking instruction is over looking basic information when it comes to health matters.  From my point of view anyway.

 

Thanks for asking and trying to learn about us! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biggest frustration is just not having anywhere to go out to eat that I can trust 100%.  Ok, Red Robin is good, but it's burgers and french fries.  There is a restaurant in MN that is gluten-free (and gluten food) but the owner is Celiac and her staff is supremely trained.  They have a HUGE menu with unique foods that are amazing.  I REALLY wish she would open a restaurant in my town :D.  Even restaurants here that say they are gluten-free, the staff is so poorly trained that you just can't eat there.

 

I would love a restaurant that has a good sized menu, has daily specials or changes the menu enough that you can eat there frequently without feeling like you are eating the same thing over and over.  It would just be nice to eat food someone else made and know it's safe.

Are you talking Twigs? We are going to make a trip there some day soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my big issues with gluten free food is that most of them have some form of processed rice in them. I've started consciously avoiding most commercial gluten free products with rice (based on Consumer Reports recommendations on limits for weekly rice consumption) and so I end up just passing by most gluten free foods! I eat a lot of naturally gluten free food, but for treats, I'd like more options that don't have rice. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas Road house in my town has gluten-free options.  I've eaten there 3 times now and been fine.

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/12588-texas-roadhouse/

http://www.texasroadhouse.com/

 

Hi Chef Patterson.

 

One of the problems with gluten-free food IMHO is that companies making it seem to consider gluten as the only possible problem.  Many celiacs have additional food intolerances that develop because of the ongoing gut irritation by the auto-immune response over years of misdiagnosis.  But few gluten-free food companies consider those.  Soy and dairy  are a couple of the problems.  But if you look at gluten-free foods on the store shelves they often have soy and or dairy in them.  Enjoy Life Foods is one exception to that trend.  They do make some allergen friendly foods.  So it's common for some of us to see gluten-free foods listed for sale that we can't eat because they have some other ingredient that will make us sick.

 

Restaurants have the same issue on their menus.  Often enuff they have a gluten-free menu but it doesn't list the other ingredients that might make some one sick.  It's almost seems like cooking schools have never heard of the top 8 food allergies list or don't teach people about it.  Celiac disease isn't an allergy but people do develop food intolerances to many of the foods that cause allergies.   You may notice some members have a signature below their posts listing their food issues.

 

So it seems to me cooking instruction is over looking basic information when it comes to health matters.  From my point of view anyway.

 

Thanks for asking and trying to learn about us! :)

 

I second all of this.  I also have nut, dairy and egg allergies so most of the pre-packaged (or even fresh from the gluten-free bakery) gluten-free "replacement" food like breads and pastries are still unsafe for me.  (I found sunbutter cups the other day at the store but was very dismayed to find out that even the dark chocolate ones have milk in them) Luckily I love cooking, and am able to make pretty much anything that I crave from scratch at this point (though, allergen free puff pastry is still evading me...  Been wanting to make an allergen-free beef wellington..).  I don't go out to eat very much, but when I do I stick with the restaurants that are open about their ingredients and willing to put in the effort to reduce the contamination risk as much as possible.

 

I'm also very frustrated with the restaurants that have "gluten sensitive" menus that do not take cross contamination into account.  I understand that in a mixed kitchen it's difficult to avoid contamination 100% of the time, but claiming that something with naturally gluten-free ingredients is still gluten-free after it's cooked in the same fryer, on the same grill or prepared on the same surface (or with the same utensils) as everything else is getting frustrating.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is great! Thank you all very much for sharing and keep it coming!

Some common themes...Price, Trust, Knowledgeable Workforce

plus we may have additional allergen concerns

Food...breads and pastries

 

I have in front of me the 26 page gluten free offerings provided by Whole Foods. I've reached out to Ener-G Foods, Udi's, Arrowhead Mills, Bob's Red Mill, King Arthur, Namaste, Pamela's Products and Food For Life (to start) for sampling and product testing. 

I've worked with the Udi's product line before (muffins and loaf bread) and find that if you don't freeze it you have a science project (holy moldy) within 2 days.  

I am excited about the extensive list that Bob's Red Mill provides, many different types of flour (not just rice and almond)...could be a good start for biscuits and bread that you do not have to toast before eating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suggestion: forget about EnerG. Just about everyone here agrees that is the nastiest tasting bread out there. It even smells bad.

 

 

Against the Grain is another company that makes great stuff. Not good for those who can't have dairy but perfect for those who can't have grains. And what I love about that company is it is a completely gluten-free facility - to the point that employees are not even allowed to bring gluten foods for their own lunch.

 

Also, there is a cookbook (fairly new I believe) called "I can't believe it's gluten-free" or something like that. (Hey everybody, you know the one I'm talking about so chime in and correct me because I think I have the name wrong.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to like Udi's bread (and muffins, and the rest) until I developed the additional allergies.  Udi's was the best sandwich bread for toasting, then assembling sandwiches for lunch and having them still be edible at lunchtime (and sometimes even dinner time).  There are other non-allergenic breads out there but they aren't as good if not eaten immediately after toasting. :/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The book Bartful is talking about is:

America's Test kitchen   The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook

 

I am going to make the dinner roll recipe tomorrow. It will be the 1st recipe from it that I'm trying. It does have a biscuit recipe & I will get around to trying that one too. Dinner rolls 1st as my hubs requested that.

 

I've only had Against The Grain's pepperoni pizza & I must say it made us swallow our tongues! Our local stores do not carry any of their other products but I wish they did. 

 

EnerG bread SUCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :ph34r: AND it gives you chipmunk cheeks.  :angry:

 

Nuts.com has some very fine gluten free flours & baking ingredients.

 

We tried the Namaste Vanilla Cake mix & were not happy with the taste nor the density/oiliness of it. HOWEVER, the Spice Cake mix is extraordinarily delicious and easy too! :)  :)

 

Krusteaz makes a gluten free Double Chocolate Brownie mix that is to die for IMHO but my hubs turns up his nose at it ~~~ He says it has "that taste" to it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My biggest frustration is getting chefs (and the staff between them and us) to understand that we don't make these requests for fun but that we must eat this way.  I do not mind paying more for a meal I KNOW is safe for my child.  If you can cook something great for him (he's 7 and along with Celiac has life threatening food allergies to egg, peanuts, tree nuts and dairy as well as bananas) we will return and tell all of our friends who live in allergy land about your place and how you were WILLING AND ABLE to cook for my kiddo safely.  Real food cooked safely is all I want.  If you can provide a dessert for him- I just may kiss you!  This has only happened to Disney with products we know (Enjoy Life brand and So Delicious ice-cream)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes!!!  Love that place!!!

We were going to go last time I was up to Mayo, but we had problems with our GPS taking us all over town before we even got to the clinic ( was my boyfriends first time in the area) and we were both very frustrated, decided to just come home. I told Jeremy we should go some day when it isn't the middle of the day since it is so close to the hub-bub that is the Mayo clinic, and things are crazy. It's about an hour and a half drive for us. There menu looks awesome, a little pricey, but I've only went out to eat once in the last nine months. Would be nice to have someone cook for me once in a while lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see healthier, gluten-free options, esp when dining out for KIDS.  Often it is a choice of chicken tenders, grilled cheese, mac n chz or a PLAIN chicken breast.  Can't eat the first 3 and the last one makes it seem like more of a punishment.

Also, Canyon Bakehouse has the best gluten-free bread...hands down

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Also, Canyon Bakehouse has the best gluten-free bread...hands down"

 

The SEVEN-GRAIN, I agree. The Mountain White, well, I'd rather have Udi's or Schar if I'm going for white bread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone is interested in a very tasty bagel option, there is a gluten-free bagel bakery here in Philly (major 8 free too) http://www.sweetnotebakery.com/

they ship as well :)

Tasted their goodies and was very impressed!!!!

 

Most of the companies that I have reached out to have agreed to send samples...I'm excited to get testing! I'll avoid Ener-G.

 

I'm also researching gluten free restaurants or restaurants that cater (knowledgably) to the celiac/gluten free community... more to come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the information! It makes a difference that a gluten eater has tasted and can recommend a gluten free item.

 

I made the dinner rolls today that I had spoken of in an earlier post on this thread. They turned out fantastic! We are both very happy with the results. There are no objectionable flavors and the crumb is perfect. I intend to post about them in the recipe thread & post photos too as soon as I can find time.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh boy! I am excited for this. Gotta prepare.

 

-runs in place, shakes out hands- OKAY! Here are my ideal situations:

 

- More SOY free gluten free meals available...both in restaurants and stores. A lot of people with celiac disease can't have soy either, and we are already limited by gluten. For example, a lot of gluten free pizzas seem to have soy (in the crust). I have found a few places that don't, but a lot of them do. There is a restaurant in one of the casinos near where I live that has GIG certified pizza that is also soy free! I was super excited. It was made from rice. In addition to soy, a lot of people with celiac disease have issues with dairy and corn, yet almost all gluten-free products are filled with dairy, soy, and corn.

 

- I would love to have a stuffed crust gluten free pizza. I've never seen that!

 

- I wish restaurants offered more gluten free options in general. Usually it's pizza and burgers without the bun. Fries are usually contaminated because they fry them in the same oil as breaded foods. I've yet to see a restaurant offer gluten-free mozzarella sticks or quesadillas. I have tried a calzone though (also soy free!), and it was amazing. 

 

- Different sizes for gluten-free pizzas. I would love to order a gluten-free party pizza and freeze it...it'd last me for ages. Even though I'd pay more, it'd be worth it. 

 

I'll add more as I think of them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have another observation. Hubs and I ate at Outback Steak House the other night. We NEVER eat out so it was a real treat. The staff was knowledgeable and I felt safe. What bugged me was the delicious looking loaf of bread they brought out for Hubs. I am not above picking it up and taking a huge whiff of the fabulous smell. I said to him, "Why can't they keep some Against the Grain baguettes (the best IMO) in their freezer and toast one up for celiacs to also enjoy bread w/ the meal?

 

Our library has an awesome café connected and they offer some amazing sounding sandwiches. I asked if they could handle gluten-free and they said, "Sure... we have a few loaves of Udi's bread in the freezer and can prepare your sandwich on that." I was happy to hear it, but didn't even begin to ask how they'd toast that bread and keep other CC issues at bay. It's a start, tho...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...