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JesterDev

Bread Maker, Does It Matter If It Has A Gluten Free Setting?

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I have a limited choice of bread makers, only one of them has a gluten free setting, but it's a cheap one with no reviews. So, I'm wondering if it matters much if is has a gluten free setting? Never made my own bread before, but I'm willing to learn. So, just wanted to make sure I don't need a maker with special settings. 

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No, it doesn't- you actually DO need a bread maker with ht egluten free settin because the dough rises at different rates than normal bread - also if you just use a normal bread maker without the special setting they break down very quickly. When making your bread you should follow the instructions on how to add the ingredients, quantities, etc to he letter. You will then enjoy your bread success! Good luck!!

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Hey, I just bought the Zojirushi Home Bakery Virtuoso breadmaker.   It has a gluten free setting, and excellent reviews on Amazon.

 

It just arrived earlier this week, and we are baking our first loaf of gluten-free bread as I type this.   I never baked bread before, but the instruction manual came with gluten-free recipes, and we just followed the instructions, as mentioned above, to the letter.  It was very easy.   I baked it with my 11 year-old celiac child.

 

The baking has just started to make our house smell good, and it will be ready in about an hour.  Can't wait!!

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Thank you! My wife found another one with a gluten free setting, and it has lots of good reviews. Don't know what kind however.

 

This is all really new to me, I've been fighting what I thought was chron's disease my whole life. Turns out I have been gluten intolerant this whole time. So, a new adventure begins for me. :)

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Our first homemade gluten-free bread was a big success.  It came out of the machine looking beautiful.  It has a nice fluff to it, not dense.  We just had it for dinner.  Fresh, warm gluten-free bread tasted so good.  My celiac child is so grateful, and our whole family enjoyed it.

 

This machine is easy to use, just follow the instructions, toss in the ingredients, push a couple of bottoms, and out came a loaf of bread in couple of hours.

 

Again, I followed the recipe to the exact, I didn't just measure it with a cup or 1/3 cup, I weighted the major ingredients to the exact grams on a scale.  

 

Their recipe is already very good.  Someone on this forum recommended the "The How Can it be Gluten Free Cookbook" by America's test kichen to me.  I will be making their special blend of flour next week, and will try some of their bread recipes.  

 

This machine is very cool.   We love it!

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Would you say that it is absolutely necessary to have a bread making machine?..I looked at the one you have purchased and its a bit pricey, perhaps someone could recommend a cheaper one on Amazon.

 

I don't want to skimp though if it is something I really need! a real necessity! as I'm a firm believer that you get what you pay for. I am going to order some Pamelas  Gluten free bread mix as well as I don't want bread in my house anymore, its far too stressful for me, especially as people don't seem to grasp that its like poison to me..the other day I was about to open the fridge door and I stopped in my tracks as the handle was all floury! (from bread) .......I cant live like this and so I have got to get organised!


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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I don't think it is necessary to have a gluten-free bread maker.  You don't knead gluten-free bread, you just pour and bake.  So not much work there to pass off to the machine.  It is just nice to have a stand mixer to mix the thick dough, depending on the recipe.


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I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

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If you are planning to make gluten-free bread on a regular basis, you most definitly should get a bread machine with gluten-free settings on it.   I have been making a loaf of bread for my daughter every week since I got this machine.   It is so easy.

 

All I have to do is to put the ingreidents (wet ingredients, then dry ingrdients on top), push a couple of bottoms, and the machine do all the work.    The gluten-free setting takes a little over 2 hours to bake.   It has a rest setting first, rest for about 30 minutes, then kneading the dough cycle, then 3 settings to rise the bread, then bake for about an hour.  

 

Based on my research, a lot of bread machine is not recommended for baking the gluten-free bread.   You will need a machine with a strong kneading power to handle the gluten-free dough.

 

By the way, I had some trouble baking since my first loaf.   I tried to bake bread from the American Test Kitchen recipe, but it didn't work so well in the bread machine.    It came out under baked.   I used custom setting, and baked 30 minutes longer a second time, it came out better, but still had some texture issues (still a little wet).

 

Then I found out that there are Gluten free recipe books on Amazon just for the bread machine!!   I bought two of them, and they just arrived on Friday.   I plan to try a simple recipe later today.

 

I am so glad that I have bought the Zojirushi bread machine.   Because both of these books are based on the Zojibushi machine, and one of them is almost exclusively written for my machine.   This makes things so much easier for me, as it takes out all the guess work for someone who is new to baking.

 

You could bake bread without using a bread machine, but if you are going to buy a machine, I would recommend getting one with the gluten-free setting on it.

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Thank you gluten-free..much appreciated.


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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That came out weird!!

 

Much appreciated!


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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If you eat a lot of bread, then it makes sense to have one. I for example, find it easier to keep flour in the cupboard and make the bread when I need to, than having to go to the shop to buy fresh bread- also where I live it is very difficult to find nice fresh gluten free bread... It always comes from a packet and tastes awful!! Even toasted...

... Ah , I nearly forgot... Every bread machine is different and you have to make sure you always stick with the instructions of your own machine as often recipes don't work with different machines...

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Thank you for your thoughts I will definitely think about what you have had to say.


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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I agree with BlessedMonmy. In my gluten days, I used a bread machine. That is because I worked full time. Nice to have fresh bread in the morning made while I was sleeping. Then I quit to be with my new baby and I baked from scratch. I loved kneading dough. I had time to allow for risings. But with gluten-free bread, all that kneading is is not necessary. It takes about the same amount of time to make a pie or bake a cake or bread.

For any baker, practice makes perfect.


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On 2/2/2015 at 11:54 AM, JesterDev said:

I have a limited choice of bread makers, only one of them has a gluten free setting, but it's a cheap one with no reviews. So, I'm wondering if it matters much if is has a gluten free setting? Never made my own bread before, but I'm willing to learn. So, just wanted to make sure I don't need a maker with special settings. 

Hello, you will need the gluten free setting. For a successful loaf the dough should only be kneaded once and rise once. Other setting will knead and rise three or more times. 

Edited by True-Blue

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