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martinamilligan

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Welcome to the forum, Martina! :)

 

How did your doctor come about the diagnosis of wheat sensitivity?  If you haven't been formally tested for Celiac disease, you may want to get tested for that before going on a wheat free diet.  A lot of people that have to avoid wheat only will eat gluten-free foods, but sometimes there can be more to it, especially in the case of a bona fide wheat allergy.  If your problem is only wheat, that is a less restrictive diet than gluten.  But they can be mixed up with each other often.

 

In general, foods that are not processed and have one ingredient are going to be the easiest to determine if they are wheat-free.  Fruits, Veggies, Meat, and Dairy (things on the outside of the grocery store) are going to be your go-to foods until you can settle into label reading to see if there is wheat in a product.  A lot of the members here are from the U.S., so keep that in mind when you see information on a product.  We have a good number of great members from Canada, as well, so hopefully they can be of help with the labeling laws there.  Meanwhile, feel free to read around the forum.  This site has been around for ten years, so pay attention to the date things are posted since product information can get out of date.  And check out our newbie 101 thread for people newly on a gluten-free diet: 

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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That's interesting that the Celiac test was on the border.  Most of the time Celiac is like a pregnancy test- either positive or negative.  But it can be inconclusive sometimes.  If you have, or can get a copy of your test results and post them here, we can give some input on it.  Many doctors do not follow the proper diagnostic criteria for Celiac disease and misdiagnose it.  We can double check that isn't the case for you.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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So, it looks like you only had one test, which was negative.  Before going on a gluten-free or Wheat free diet, I strongly suggest getting more testing and perhaps a visit to a gastrointestinal specialist who can do an upper endoscopy to look further into the tummy issues and take biopsies.  Here is a list (From a lovely fellow moderator) that you can take to your doctor to make sure your testing is thorough:

 

-tTG IgA and tTG IgG
-DGP IgA and DGP IgG
-EMA IgA 
-total serum IgA and IgG (control test)
-AGA IGA and AGA IgG - older and less reliable tests largely replace by the DGP tests
-endoscopic biopsy - make sure at least 6 samples are taken
 
To make sure your Tissue Transglutaminase Ab IgA is not a false negative, a total IgA needs to be done.  You cannot say your result is negative without doing the control test.  Also, you can request a genetic test for Celiac disease to see if you have the gene.    That way you can have a better overall picture.  Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) does not have any blood tests to diagnose it- the test is whether or not you respond to a gluten-free diet.
 
Overall, I highly recommend getting more testing done before eliminating gluten or wheat from your diet.  It is important to also try to distinguish if your issue is gluten, or just wheat.  Gluten is also found in Barley and Rye.  If Celiac tests come back positive, it is definitely gluten.  But if they come back negative, it will take some experimenting with the diet to see for sure.  But definitely request an appointment with your doctor to get more testing done before accepting just a "wheat sensitivity".

I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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If you aren't able to get them done with current resources, then going ahead and trying out a wheat free diet is the next step for sure.  If you are able to keep a diary of what you eat and any symptoms you have, you may be able to pinpoint whether it is a gluten issue or a wheat issue.  I would lean towards avoiding all gluten for now, as that is more common than just a wheat issue.  But that is your decision to make.  Just know that if you ever want to be formally tested for Celiac in the future, you would have to have a period where you consume gluten again before the tests are done.  There are many people here on the forum that don't have a formal diagnosis for various reasons, and they are okay with that.  

 

So, check out that newbie 101 thread I linked, there are lots of things to start from there.  Give away all wheat/gluten containing items from your pantry, and to keep costs down, focus on whole foods like fruits, meat, and veggies, instead of buying the pricey gluten free substitute items.  If you do actually have Celiac disease that is so far undetected, there can be many months of healing time until symptoms get better.  So give it a good while before you decide whether or not a gluten-free diet or wheat free diet is working for you.  For ideas of what to eat, check out this thread where we share what we make for dinner:   https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/75238-the-whats-for-dinner-tonight-chat/

 

More people will be in when morning comes with some other great input for you.  Feel free to ask any specific questions you may have.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I throw up when I eat anything with wheat too, or barley, or rye.... haha or corn ..or soy  *sigh* or if it does somehow manage to make it past  my stomach and to my intestines, I am in floor squirming, panting, begging for death, pain...

 

How can they test your blood when you cannot keep the stuff down>??? I cannot be tested because of this.  Any test would come back negative because my body FORCES me to be gluten free.

 

Have you talked about that with your doctor?

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It is always hard when medical testing is not an option. Try going gluten free and see how you feel. Once you are stable, you can add rye to see if that affects you. Then try barley and see how you feel. You deserve to feel well and have a healthy life. And both blood tests and biopsy can be inaccurate. Save up your money to eat well.

 

Clearly bread has wheat, anything breaded has wheat, all pasta (save gluten-free) has wheat, nearly all processed products have some wheat, rye, or barley.

The best way to start is to shop around the outside of a grocery store. That is the fresh produce (plain frozen veggies should be OK to start), meat, and dairy. Stay away from the center of the store where all those lovely easy to cook products are kept.

 

Good luck

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Actually there are PLENTY of processed products that are gluten-free. For example, I just had some Progressso soup that is gluten-free. Lay's potato chips are gluten-free. Most ice creams are gluten-free. Lot's of sausage brands are gluten-free. Reeses peanut butter cups (the regular ones, not the holiday ones) and hershey kisses are gluten-free. There are TONS of things.

 

There are several companies such as Kraft, Unilever, Con-Agra, and Nestles that will clearly state on the label if there are gluten ingredients. They will also declare if their products are made on the same line or in the same facility as gluten foods. All you need to look for on their labels are wheat, rye, barley or oats. If you don't see them, you can eat them.

 

It's true that whole foods are better for anyone (celiac or not), but you don't necessarily have to give up all of your old favorites.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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