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GF-Cheetah Cub

Active Dry Yeast Vs Instant Rapid Rise Yeast?

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Hello,

 

I just bought a Zojirushi Bread Maker.   The bread recipe it came with said to use Active Dry Yeast.   I used that recipe last week, and we loved our first loaf of gluten-free bread.

 

Tomorrow, I want to try a recipe from the American Test Kitchen, but that recipe is using Instant or Rapid rise yeast.  

 

Do I have have to use Active Dry Yeast in the bread maker?   Or can I follow the American Test Kitchen recipe, and use the Instand Rapid rise yeast in the bread maker?

 

Thanks!!

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You can use either one in my opinion. Whatever is in your kitchen or on sale! I prefer traditional and buy a bag of it at Costco. Keep it in the frig and it will last for a year or more. You can always proof it to make sure it is active.


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Thanks!   That's good to know.

 

I am an inexperienced baker, and I was worried that you can only use Active Dry Yeast in the bread machine, because all their gluten-free recipes in the book use Active Dry Yeast.

 

I will use the Instant yeast tomorrow according to the American Test Kitchen recipe.  

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Yes you can use either. Dry active yeast is a larger granular  and needs to be activated in water(110 degrees). Instant is a smaller granular and can be added into dry ingredients. Instant is also ideal for bread machines. Rapid is an even smaller granular and has added enzymes and other addition to make it rise fast.

The America's test kitchen recipe for bread is very good.

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My America's Test Kitchen white bread was a bust.   Bummer!  

 

It came out of my bread maker dense, it appears to be not fully rised or baked.   In fact, there were several purpleish colored wet spots inside the loaf when I sliced it.

 

The flavor itself was quite good.   I think I just don't know how to take this recipe to work in the bread maker.

 

Should I try this recipe again with Active Dry Yeast?   The bread maker's recipe uses Active Dry Yeast.

 

Or perhaps I need to bake it longer?   I saw that the Bread Maker's gluten-free baking time is set for one hour, but the America Test Kitchen said to bake it longer, for 1.5 hours.

 

Anyone here had success baking the America Test Kitchen recipe in the bread maker?  Any tip and advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks!

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I made the ATK sandwich bread recipe (not in a breadmaker) and found it incredibly dense.  I can't imagine trying to bite into two slices of it with a filling.  It does indeed taste good and it toasts up really well, but soft it is not.  I tried the multigrain bread recipe, cutting the psyllium powder from 3T to 2T and that seemed to help, but it's still pretty dense.  You do need to bake it longer than any other recipe I have tried in order to get rid of the unusually large amount of water added.  They also recommend a lower baking temperature than my usual recipes, so you might need to adjust the breadmaker settings.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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Thanks for letting me know!!   I did try baking it a second time with Active Dry yeast, and adjusted the baking time to 1.5 hours.   It did come out nicely baked, but still dense.    I was surprised, because I kept expecting a great loaf of bread from this recipe!!  So, I am glad to know that perhaps it wasn't me doing something wrong.  

 

It is a bummer though, because we liked the taste, it seemed to have potential, but it was too dense.

 

I see your avatar is two loafs of bread.   Have you found that perfect loaf?  

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Not the perfect loaf, but with trial and error I found recipes that suit different needs.  One crumbly bread that is good for making bread crumbs.  A few loaves that are good for slices.  Biscuits, French bread, crumpets, pizza dough.  Keep playing around, and make a lot of different recipes until you find some keepers.  I have never found one that gives you the texture of Wonder Bread, but there are better and worse versions of homemade wheat bread.  I started with Bette Hagman's books 10 years ago and made and re-made and adapted recipes, picking up others from the internet or other cookbooks.  Of course I have a houseful of weird flours, but some things are good enough to have to hide from the gluten-eaters.


Lee

I never liked bread anyway.....

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Sorry, I'm late to this party but I had to chip in:  my first two attempts using the ATK bread recipe, I ended up with a good bread flavor but the loaves were also incredibly dense!  Yesterday I tried the recipe in the bread maker and made couple of tweaks and it turned out to be a beautiful "perfect" loaf - really - of sandwhich bread.Here is what I did: Instead of two eggs, which the recipe calls for, I used two eggs and 4 egg whites. I also added quite a bit more water to the mix cycle than the recipe called for  (sorry, I didn't measure) until the dough looked more like batter.  In my first two attempts I  should have added much more water, but didn't.  I used the "gluten-free" cycle on the bread machine and let it take over.  I used "rapid rise" for my bread machine and "active dry" for my first two efforts. If I can duplicate this result one more time, I think I have found my go-to bread recipe.

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