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teacher1578

Dealing With A Spouse

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Hi. I am newly diagnosed within the past week. What do you do if a spouse is unsupportive? He seems to think cross-contamination is not possible (by the way, does it affect everyone?). He also seems to think I am overexaggerating and I am blowing it out of proportion. We have fought so much this past week. Needless to say I am hungry and tired and depressed, as I figure out what I can and cannot eat. I am trying to educate him, but he does not want to listen. I told him my colleagues are being more supportive and he laughed and tried to change the topic. He is complaining about how his life is going to change. HELLO?! We did not eat out that often, but he is saying we cannot go out to eat, esp. at nice restaurants any more. What about me? Also, he seems to think it is funny that I am suggesting separate cookware in the house. Please give advice....I know I am venting, but desperately seeking advice from people who have been in similar situations with their spouses. THANK YOU!

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Hi Teacher.

Sorry to hear that... the last thing you need right now is this.

YES - cross-contamination effects everyone. If you are less sensitive than others then you may not FEEL any reaction, but there will be a reaction going on inside your body. A miniscule amount of gluten (licking a stamp!) is enough to trigger a reaction that continues in your body for around a month. That is fact.

I have trouble getting my spouse to remember everything (wash hands before unloading dishwasher, etc.) but he's not unwilling, just forgetful/distracted. Still, I wish he took more interest in what I'm going through. He's sympathetic, but what I really need is for him to take an interest in understanding the condition. The in's and out's seem of no interest to him. I've bought books and asked him to read them to get a better understanding, but they just sit there unread. Oh well... At least he is sympathetic and any time he catches himself complaining about being tired, or it being hard to find food when he travels (he's doing low-carb), he suddenly remembers that it's *nothing* compared to my problem, and says so.

Anyway, good luck with educating your lesser half... ;) But first and foremost, look after yourself and be safe. It's sometimes tempting (especially in the early stages) to try and fit in, maybe order what you *think* is gluten-free on the menu but not double-check with the staff, so as not to cause a fuss. I tell you what I've learned - it's not worth it! Make a fuss! Not only will you have less chance of getting sick, but if you downplay your condition at this critical point, when everyone around you is also learning about it, you will *never* get them to take you seriously.

And PS: Nice restaurants are the MOST likely to be able to meet your gluten-free needs. :) Their staff are usually more attentive and better trained than at diner-style places where the staff are rushed and underpaid and waiting to go home. I use this fact as an excuse to only ever be taken to expensive restaurants - it's for my safety! :lol:

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I'm sorry you are not getting support. To prevent cross contamination, you'll need to have separate condiment jars (peanut butter, butter, jam, mayo, ect), a new toaster, and new deep fryer, ect. Cross contamination can affect everyone with celiac disease and even if they don't feel sick, gluten can still damage the intestines. Maybe print off some info for him to read on the complications of celiac disease and how important it is that we are 100% gluten free.

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Nice restaurants are the easiest because they have real chefs.

richard

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Hi. I am newly diagnosed within the past week. What do you do if a spouse is unsupportive? He seems to think cross-contamination is not possible (by the way, does it affect everyone?). He also seems to think I am overexaggerating and I am blowing it out of proportion. We have fought so much this past week. Needless to say I am hungry and tired and depressed, as I figure out what I can and cannot eat. I am trying to educate him, but he does not want to listen. I told him my colleagues are being more supportive and he laughed and tried to change the topic. He is complaining about how his life is going to change. HELLO?! We did not eat out that often, but he is saying we cannot go out to eat, esp. at nice restaurants any more. What about me? Also, he seems to think it is funny that I am suggesting separate cookware in the house. Please give advice....I know I am venting, but desperately seeking advice from people who have been in similar situations with their spouses. THANK YOU!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

First, you CAN go out to eat, and the nice restaurants are easier than the quick'n'dirty chains. So let him know that's not a problem.

Second, accept that he doesn't understand. He doesn't have to understand. He just has to cooperate. Cooperation merely takes respect for your wishes, not any understanding whatsoever.

Third, "he is complaining about how his life is going to change", well... he madet he decision to marry you; he made the decision to give up some of the absolute control over every last element of change in his life when he did that.

Try not to focus him too much on the details; if he's uninterested or unbelieving, it will just go past him. Ask for him not to understand and help you do it, but merely to follow your lead. He only has to do it so that you feel comfortable, not be on the diet himself. If it would help him to come here and post and ask the other non-celiac spouses on the board for their input/experience, perhaps that would help him realize that his diet does not have to drastically change.

My husband is supportive in general, but isn't as convinced as we are that *any* minute crumb will hurt me. He does believe that visible crumbs are a problem, but thinks I go a bit paranoid about it sometimes. And even I would say I go a bit paranoid about it sometimes. But he realizes that the negative effect of me being constantly worried and hypervigilant at cleaning up after him is a toll itself, regardless of the physical risk of contamination. The mental wear isn't a good thing either, so he works with me in dealing with the contamination issues to help me not worry about, at the least, my house and things that should be "safe zones" for me. (For instance, we work for the same group, and bring lunch together. He'll leave his utensil on my desk so I can throw it in the little cooler, and if he's used it on something not gluten-free, he'll put a little sticky note on it that says "EVIL", so I know not to use it. He's mostly cleaned it, but realizes how much is helps me feel more relaxed that he watches out as well. And it's just not worth the risk of me getting sick (and I don't get that sick).)

Sit down and talk with him calmly, trying to come to an agreement about how to deal with it together. If he's the sort that would rather follow, just give him the directions about what to do. If he's the sort that wants to work out the solution, discuss, in a friendly way, with him, the approach you'll take as a family. You have your boundaries and he has his - find the common ground where you can work together.

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Needless to say I am hungry and tired and depressed, as I figure out what I can and cannot eat.
Here are some of my favorite recipes with brand names to get you started. I got some ideas from Tiffany actually (smoothie, putting tuna salad in a taco), so thank-you Tiffany!

*Please double check ingredient lists on the products that I suggested if you do not live in Canada*

Blueberry Smoothie

1 cup frozen blueberries

1 ½ cups Vanilla So Good Soy milk (OR rice milk, almond milk, ect)

2 tablespoons honey

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Tuna/Chicken/Turkey Salad Sandwiches

Italian white Kinnikinick bread (I get this at Sobeys), toasted OR Old El Paso corn tacos

2-3 tablespoons mayonnaise (Kraft with clearly indicate gluten in their ingredient lists)

1 can tuna or chicken/turkey equivalent

2-3 celery sticks, diced

4-5 green onions, diced

1 red pepper, diced

If you use corn tacos, they taste really good after they’ve been made and then put in the fridge for awhile and then heated.

Spaghetti

Tinkyada pasta (Sobeys or Super Store)

1 bottle Ragu Spaghetti sauce (all are safe, but I recommend herbed tomato and wine)

Hamburger

1 Green and Red pepper, diced

1 Onion, diced

4-5 Mushrooms, diced

1 clove garlic, minced

Cook pasta as directed, cook meat/onions and garlic together until done, slowly add other veggies and mushrooms, then add the sauce.

Pizza

Kinnikinick Pizza crusts (Sobeys)

Hamburger, cooked

Ragu Spaghetti sauce or check the Kraft pizza sauces (Kraft will always indicate gluten)

your choice of toppings

Bake in oven at about 400 for 10-15 minutes. I recommend putting some oil on the pan to avoid sticking.

Stuffing

* 4 shallots, minced

* 2 onions, diced

* 5 celery ribs, diced

* 5 carrots, diced

* 2-3 TB butter (I use soybean butter)

* 2 tbl dry sage

* 2 tbl dry thyme

* 2 tbl dry summer savory

* dash of pepper

* 1 cup white wine

* 1 loaf gluten-free bread, cubed (I use Kinnikinnick Italian white tapioca, thawed)

* 1 cup gluten-free chicken stock (I use 1 cup of Imagine chicken broth, or 2

cubes of McCormick chicken bouillon and 1 cup of water).

Sauté the vegetables in the butter until they are soft. Add the seasonings and cook over medium heat for 2 minutes. Add the white wine, and continue cooking over medium heat until the liquid is reduced by half. In a large bowl, mix the sautéed vegetables with the bread cubes, chicken stock, and parsley. Transfer to a baking dish and bake for 20 minutes at 325̊ F.

Variations:

Add finely diced sausage or bacon bits to the sauté, or toss in diced chestnuts, apples, or raisins. For cornbread stuffing, try adding dried cranberries or toasted pecans.

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/gf_stuffing.html

Pad Thai Stir Fry

Original Pad Thai Stir Fry Rice Noodle meal Kit (I get this Kit at Sobeys and just modify the instructions for cooking). I use:

4-5 green onions

1-2 red peppers

1-2 cups bean sprouts

3-4 eggs

Regular Stir fry

Use the same sauce as the chinese stir fry below and half the ingredients (omit the wine)

1 bag green giant frozen veggies

rice

Cook the veggies, add sauce to the veggies while cooking, serve over cooked rice

Chinese Stirfry

2-3 tablespoons olive oil

2-3 cups of white rice

You can add cooked bite size chicken or beef to this if you're feeling adventurous

Veggies:

1 medium Nappa cabbage, cut up into bite size pieces

1 large red pepper (or 2 small), cut up into very small portions

5-7 green onions (depending on how much you like them), sliced thin

2 cups Chinese bean sprouts

1 small can water chestnuts

Sauce: (you can half the ingredients if you don't like lots of sauce)

2 cups water (depending on how much sauce you like)

2 McCormick all-vegetable Bouillon (vegetable, chicken, or beef)

2 tablespoons of VH soy sauce

2 tablespoons of corn starch (add more if you want it thicker)

2 tablespoons white sugar

2 tablespoons white wine (optional, just adds flavour)

You will need a large stir fry pan, skillet, or pot.

- Cook rice while preparing stirfry

- Place olive oil in pot and cook red pepper for about 5 minutes over medium heat.

- Place nappa in with oil and pepper and cook 5 minutes over medium heat. Be careful it doesn't burn.

- Add the rest of veggies and all the ingredients for the sauce, add the liquids first and then the dry ingredients.

- cover and cook on low heat for about 15 minutes or until all veggies are done. stir often to avoid burning.

Serve Over Rice and Enjoy!

Chili

2 cans Heinz beans in tomato sauce

2 cans Heinz Chili style Kidney beans

1 can Hunts-Wesson tomato sauce

1 can tomatoes

1 small Imagine Tomato soup (if you can’t find this, just add extra tomato sauce)

Extra lean hamburger

Veggies (e.g green/red pepper, green/yellow onion, corn, garlic)

Chili powder, McCormick or Club house (add as much as you want)

Cook hamburger and veggies until done. Add everything in a big pot and heat.

Tacos

Old El Paso Corn Tacos

Old El Paso Salsa

Old El Paso Taco seasoning

Veggies (e.g lettuce, tomatoes, onions, green/red peppers, garlic)

Hamburger

Cook hamburger and seasoning according to package directions. Then make the tacos! These also taste great the next day.

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My spouse and daughter are the ones with celiac. I am the main researcher, careful cook, and cheerleader for them.

However, my parents thought this is all a bunch of hogwash. For quite a while there they seemed to almost set us up for gluten. It was as if they felt that if they could get gluten in secretly they could then say, "Ahha, you had gluten and didn't know it. Nothing bad happened. Proof that this is all nuts." They finally came around though. I guess their attempts actually served to prove it to them.

John also went through something similar at work. Some of is co-workers are playfully mischievous. A few times when he has had a flare up of symptoms and I couldn't find the gluten source, I have to admit to wondering if some prankster was at work. Especially, when he has a sudden flare up at work.

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Have him read some medical stuff on the internet if he isn't buying the cross contamination issue, there is a lot of info out there. I'd think that he'd want you to feel good, that will make life easier for both of you.

I have to say that I'm single and when I read this sort of thing it makes me so happy to be so (yes I'm jaded). We are beginning to think my daughter has to be gluten-free, (getting her tested in a few weeks) and my ex husband will not be on board for this, he has already said they (he and his fiance) will "try" to keep her gluten-free but with 3 other kids and 2 adults in their house who are not gluten-free it probably won't work. He is taking the attitude that she is with me more then him so it will be "mostly" fine.

Our house is almost totally gluten-free, most of my cooking is now gluten-free and it works for us. At this point my daughter does still eat some gluten (cookies and stuff) but she "gets" it and is very careful, cleans up, eats the junk in her room, etc.

good luck, Susan

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Have him read some medical stuff on the internet if he isn't buying the cross contamination issue, there is a lot of info out there. I'd think that he'd want you to feel good, that will make life easier for both of you.

I have to say that I'm single and when I read this sort of thing it makes me so happy to be so (yes I'm jaded). We are beginning to think my daughter has to be gluten-free, (getting her tested in a few weeks) and my ex husband will not be on board for this, he has already said they (he and his fiance) will "try" to keep her gluten-free but with 3 other kids and 2 adults in their house who are not gluten-free it probably won't work. He is taking the attitude that she is with me more then him so it will be "mostly" fine.

Our house is almost totally gluten-free, most of my cooking is now gluten-free and it works for us. At this point my daughter does still eat some gluten (cookies and stuff) but she "gets" it and is very careful, cleans up, eats the junk in her room, etc.

good luck, Susan

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Guest nini

my husband had the very same reaction when I was first dx. It took a while, but he finally came around, and is now Gluten Free at home. He will still eat Gluten when he is outside of the home, but is very supportive about keeping our home environment as Gluten free as possible. Just keep educating yourself and him on the ins and outs of this condition and the diet and eventually (hopefully) he will come around.

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Have him read some medical stuff on the internet if he isn't buying the cross contamination issue, there is a lot of info out there.  I'd think that he'd want you to feel good, that will make life easier for both of you. 

I have to say that I'm single and when I read this sort of thing it makes me so happy to be so (yes I'm jaded).  We are beginning to think my daughter has to be gluten-free, (getting her tested in a few weeks) and my ex husband will not be on board for this, he has already said they (he and his fiance) will "try" to keep her gluten-free  but with 3 other kids and 2 adults in their house who are not gluten-free it probably won't work.  He is taking the attitude that she is with me more then him so it will be "mostly" fine. 

Our house is almost totally gluten-free, most of my cooking is now gluten-free and it works for us.  At this point my daughter does still eat some gluten (cookies and stuff) but she "gets" it and is very careful, cleans up, eats the junk in her room, etc.

good luck,  Susan

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That's a little too aloof an attitude for me to deal with without saying something. Your ex is behaving like a jerk. If your daughter comes up positive for Celiac Disease, you will have medical proof of an auto immune disorder that requires a 100% gluten free diet for life. For him to suggest, even at this stage, that he wouldn't comply 100% says that he would be negligent towards her documented health needs. He would be guilty of causing her harm. He doesn't have to look out for you and your diet, but he needs to be made aware of his responsibility towards his daughter if she does indeed have celiac disease. You know, you could deny him time with her if the time she spends with him results in damage to her immune system. He needs to prepare for a possible dx and act like a grown-up. Good luck to you! :unsure:

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Here are some of my favorite recipes with brand names to get you started. I got some ideas from Tiffany actually (smoothie, putting tuna salad in a taco), so thank-you Tiffany!

Aw... thanks!

Personally, I think this is the BEST way to find foods to eat. Get ideas from other people, books, restaurants, pictures, etc. I own... dear me... too many cookbooks to admit to. It probably adds up to over 20,000 recipes. I think I may have cooked all of 30 or 40 of those directly from the cookbook. But I have gotten a myriad of ideas from them, either nearly following the recipe, or just getting a spark of imagination from it. It brings so much variety into your diet! :-)

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Sometimes it just takes a while for them to get it. I have one of the best boyfriends on the planet and it took him at least a month or two to really "get it". The initial shock is really hard for everyone, and he had a hard time dealing with me freaking out, and would say stuff like "well every now and then you can have some." He didn't know, I didn't know, and he was just trying to make it less of a huge thing. The first few months are gonna be really rough, regardless of your relationship, because you're suddenly confronted with the facts of a huge auto-immune disorder thats going to change your whole life. Its scary as get-out, and alot of guys (and girls) don't deal with that fear well at all.

The good news is, after you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy to deal with, and the world gets more savvy about us every day.

For dining out, which is really scary at first, then gets a bit easier, I recommend the www.triumphdining.com dining cards. They have really improved my ability to communicate while eating out.

It gets easier.

Elonwy

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I agree my ex is acting like a jerk, umm that's really why he is my ex. I could probably go to court and stop his visitation but my daughter is 14 and she wants to spend time with her dad so she'd hate me (and so would he) if I did that. I believe so strongly that she needs her father that I've had a 4 year long distance relationship with my boyfriend (we fly back and forth every other week) just so I don't yank her away. I believe at 14 she can make this happen if she wants too and thats the issue..... getting a 14 year old to never eat gluten again is difficult especially when her symptoms are not bad.

I'm going to talk to the jerk but he's a hard sell.

susan

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I agree my ex is acting like a jerk, umm that's really why he is my ex.  I could probably go to court and stop his visitation but my daughter is 14 and she wants to spend time with her dad so she'd hate me (and so would he) if I did that.  I believe so strongly that she needs her father that I've had a 4 year long distance relationship with my boyfriend (we fly back and forth every other week) just so I don't yank her away.  I believe at 14 she can make this happen if she wants too and thats the issue..... getting a 14 year old to never eat gluten again is difficult especially when her symptoms are not bad. 

I'm going to talk to the jerk but he's a hard sell.

susan

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hang in there. B)

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Teacher 1578, Did you read my mind (or my life story?)? When I read your post, it felt like I had written it. He still hasn't come around entirely, but after my most recent glutenings (where gluten was not listed on package, got sick, called, and co. confirmed these things had gluten), he's beginning to take me and my situation (including contamination) more seriously. Its like he didn't believe me and took multiple glutenings and bouts of illness for him to wake up. Everyone above implies it gets easier with time, and I agree. Tiffany also says you can eat out at restaurants, and I would agree to that too (though I am still too afraid myself, but I'm just chicken.....give me a couple more months :) ). Marriage is hard enough as it is (hardest job you'll ever have, and you don't get overtime, vacation, or sick leave :) ), a disease like this only makes things more difficult....

I am sure he will come around. Good luck.

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Teacher-

I am so sorry that you are having a rough go of it.

I am too lazy to read the rest of the replies so if mine is a repeat of someone elses I am sorry.

He is under a lot of stress, he may be worried about you, and worried about how this will affect his life as well.

My best advice would be to have a big sit down talk (Guys hate those so be sure to make it clear that he isn't in trouble)

Sit down and find out how he feels about your diagnosis and listen to his fears and worries

I know you are going through a tough time and it doesn't seem like you should have to hold his hand through this, but fair or not you might have to anyway.

We are here if you have a bad day and need to vent, and we will help as much as we can.

When you talk to him though, repeat back to him how he feels, and if you add how you feel make sure it doesn't come off like you are attacking him (people have a way of feeling attacked even when they aren't)

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My ex-wife just didn't get it at all and it is why we got divorced. My girlfriend gets it completely. Of course there is a learning curve about what foods one can eat but she is a fast study. Some people just can't accept that a common food can make someone so sick.

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My husband is very understanding luckily, but he really came around with the cross contamination issue when he saw the incredible improvement in my health, mood, etc. Now he tries to be very careful.

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Sometimes, you just have to force their hand a little.

I always think the smartest things newly diagnosed gluten-free- folks need to do are the following

1. Purchase "squeezable" gluten-free condomints (no need for knives and other "dirty" silverware)

2. Buy your own toaster (they are like $12)

3. Over time, buy your own pans -- look for deals at Target, Sears, etc (and hide yours -- or make his easily accessible - ha)

4. Get to know which chain restaurants around you have gluten-free menus

5. Embrace the fact that most "expensive" places will be able to serve you (talk to a manager -- then the chef and then a server)

6. Buy your own spatulas and other plastic cookware

7. Invest in Wine, wine, wine (glasses and read up on a great hobby!!)

8. Buy a breadmachine

9. Make your own bread

10. Buy him a copy of any of Bette Hagman's books...

Hope this helps

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I am sorry that you are having a hard time. My husband has Celiac & I can't imagine not doing all that I can to support him 100%. The more knowledge I gain the more I can help. We research together & try & learn about things that effect him & how to make things better. I think your husband just needs to know more to really understand. I say hit the library or bookstore or maybe just turn him on to this site & he will surely understand how serious this is.

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Hi. I am newly diagnosed within the past week. What do you do if a spouse is unsupportive? He seems to think cross-contamination is not possible (by the way, does it affect everyone?). He also seems to think I am overexaggerating and I am blowing it out of proportion. We have fought so much this past week. Needless to say I am hungry and tired and depressed, as I figure out what I can and cannot eat. I am trying to educate him, but he does not want to listen. I told him my colleagues are being more supportive and he laughed and tried to change the topic. He is complaining about how his life is going to change. HELLO?! We did not eat out that often, but he is saying we cannot go out to eat, esp. at nice restaurants any more. What about me? Also, he seems to think it is funny that I am suggesting separate cookware in the house. Please give advice....I know I am venting, but desperately seeking advice from people who have been in similar situations with their spouses. THANK YOU!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Some people are just kind of clueless. All of my friends and family are supportive of any new thing I try because they all know and understand how sick I've been over the last few years. But, I have an example from this weeked of cluelessness. I told my mother that I was going to go gluten-free to see if it would clear up my many symptoms. She is absolutely supportive of any dietary change because she knows medications and doctor's appointments have not made me well. She asked me what exactly gluten was, and I explained it, and told her that I bought some Millet bread which was gluten-free. Then she turned around and asked, so what kind of bread can you have...white, sourdough, wheat? I had to laugh because I know she just doesn't get it...she thinks white bread doesn't have wheat because it's white and doesn't say "wheat" on the label (honestly! :lol: ).

So all that is to say that perhaps your husband just doesn't really get how serious this really is. I can say that HIS life will definitely change if you don't get well.

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Guest Viola

My hubby understands all of it ... he should after 16 years ... however, he is one of those people who will never be completely domesticated in a kitchen. I have to clean the counter of his bread, cracker and cereal crumbs several times a day. It's not that he doesn't 'know' and when I call him on it, he's totally on the defensive. Which makes life confrontational. :(

So ... I've decided he will never change and it's up to me to make sure that my food stays un-contaminated. We have two toaster ovens in the house.. two separate counters, and as many squeeze bottles as they make condiments. He is no longer allowed to have un-sliced bread as he makes three times the mess slicing it. He was pretty ticked at that one to start with, but doesn't say anything anymore, we just buy the sliced stuff. And I have now got him eating gluten free pasta, which is a big help in not making two meals everyday. Thank you Tinkyada!!! :lol: He is also eating gluten free pancakes, and of course other meals that are naturally gluten free. But he does love his sandwiches, and gluten laden goodies.

So ... my advice is fight for what is 'really important to stay gluten free' and adjust what you can to make it safer and less confrontational. If you are lucky your spouse will learn, if you are not ... it is your disease, do what you have to in order to stay healthy.

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Shirley, have you tried Breads From Anna's gluten-free bread? It's incredibly good and similar to regular wholewheat bread - maybe your husband could switch to that. It's more expensive than wheat bread of course, and you have to make it yourself, but to cut down on a major source of kitchen contamination I would think it would be worth it. Plus if you bought a huge case the cost would be lower. Just a thought. :) I haven't got my husband to go gluten-free, but as he is doing low carb there aren't many crumbly gluten things in the house. He still has the gluten-filled low carb bars, but they are pretty easy to keep away from me. I would really love it if he would go gluten-free though, at least in the house. I have hinted by telling him how great it is that other people's spouses on the board have gone gluten-free, but he's not much of a one for picking up on hints! I will just have to make do with de-glutening the dog. He gets more kisses anyway! :lol:

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Guest Viola

One of my husband's excuses for not going gluten free is the cost. Although I think it is mostly just an excuse as he doesn't like the texture and the after taste of many things made with rice. I'm not sure I could totally blame him, as given the choice I probably wouldn't be gluten free either.

I think if we were really honest, very few of us would be totally gluten free just by choice. If we are feeling really healthy (like him) on lovely, tasty gluten filled stuff, why would we? :rolleyes: It is only because we became sick that we even learned what gluten is. :lol:

I just wish that he would be more careful and not get mad and defensive when I say something. The rest I can deal with.

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      April 17-27, 2020   For the past few years many of you have asked us to arrange a River Boat Cruise that will allow us to visit Amsterdam's famous Keukenhof Gardens at its prime time of the blossoming of the millions of Tulips and Hyacinths - alongside the windmills of the Netherlands.  With the participation of a minimum of 20 persons we have arranged an All-Inclusive Cruise from Antwerp to Amsterdam.  This cruise will not be offered to the public until January, 2019 and always sells out quickly.   THERE WILL BE NO MONEY REQUIRED NOR COMMITMENT FROM YOU until we have all the final costs and details.  If you are at all interested check out our website for as many of the details that we have as of this time.   We need your request to be placed on a list of interested participants so we can present that number to Uniworld to show we have the sincere interest in this All-Inclusive Bob & Ruth's Gluten-free Cruise.   PLEASE CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR THE DETAILED INFORMATION THAT WE HAVE AS OF THIS TIME.   http://bobandruths.com
    • April 24, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
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      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • May 04, 2019 Until May 05, 2019
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      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
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