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nvsmom

Best Flour For Gravy?

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I keep playing around with different flours and starches to try and find the best one for gravy.  In the last three years, I have failed to make the perfect gravy.... Help!

 

I need a flour or starch that is gluten-free and that is nut-free, so mixes like Bob's Red Mill is out.

 

I like the flavour of corn starch gravy but the next day gravy jello isn't great for left overs.

 

Any tips?  Spices and flavouring tips are welcomed!  :)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Full Flavor Foods has some  very good gravies, broths ....We  use  corn starch... next  day we just  add  either a  little water  or  broth & reheat stirring  it  until desired  consistency.Not  hard  at all...be  sure  to use a  whisk to get lumps  out....

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I use tapioca starch. Make it a slurry before you add it, of course.  Hmmm  I do not get gravy jello the next day... I can only think that means it was way too much starch?  Or maybe that is just what corn starch does?  I do not know. I add the slurry when the gravy base is in a pan and still cooking and I whisk it silly. It gets thicker as it cooks.  You probably already know all of that... the details were for others. :D

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Mamaw -  I haven't seen that brand but I'll keep my eyes open.  I'm up in Canada so some of our brand names are different.  Even the gluten-free status of some brands varies from country to country.

 

MycasMommy - Huh, I haven't tried tapioca yet for some reason, and I alwas have it on hand for baking and making chicken nuggets.  I may try that for Easter dinner.

 

I had my boys help with the slurry yesterday for the pork roast gravy.  I added my flours (tried Namaste - too gritty) and water to a jar and told them to shake it.  I dumped it into the pan before I checked it's lump free status.  Oops. It looked like tiny little dumplings floating in my gravy.  I felt obliged to slander their muscles and jar shaking abilities after that.  LOL  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I use tapioca starch. Make it a slurry before you add it, of course.  Hmmm  I do not get gravy jello the next day... I can only think that means it was way too much starch?  Or maybe that is just what corn starch does?  I do not know. I add the slurry when the gravy base is in a pan and still cooking and I whisk it silly. It gets thicker as it cooks.  You probably already know all of that... the details were for others. :D

 

Or maybe try adding half the amount you THINK you will need as it does get thicker as it cooks? I wish I had some measurements for you but its all a by eye and experience type of thing... how much gravy is in the pan etc....

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I just use my flour blend with a pinch of xanthan gum. I keep this on hand for baking and to make gravy, make a slurry with it and perfect every time.   I spent a lot of time experimenting with this blend (a little will to bake and a lot of science :) ) it works cup for cup with any recipe gluten free or not (of course with xanthan gum added).  Most of the flours can be found inexpensively at an Asian store or in that aisle at your grocery store.  Except the sorghum but a bag is not too expensive and goes a long way.  If you like a more whole grain feel to your baked goods you can skip the sweet rice flour and use all sorghum  :) 

 

Flour blend

5 parts white rice flour 5 cups,

1 1/2 parts sorghum flour 1 1/2 cups,

1 1/2 parts sweet rice flour 1 1/2 cups,

4 parts tapioca starch 4 cups

I mix this ahead in a large cereal keeper so I always have it on hand.

Depends what you are making on how much xanthan gum.

xanthan gum (measurements are per cup of flour)

1/2 tsp per cup for cookies, cakes, and cupcakes

¾ tsp for muffins and quick breads

1 to 1 ½ tsp for breads

2 tsp for pizza crust

 

Enjoy!!


*Judy
Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs RE-TESTED ALL FOOD ALLERGIES IN JUNE 2015 AND THEY ARE ALL NEGATIVE NOW!  TIME TO RE-INTRODUCE FISH AND NUTS!!! 
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. c
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010 

Hyperthyroid 2013 - benign tumors and entire thyroid removed

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Or maybe try adding half the amount you THINK you will need as it does get thicker as it cooks? I wish I had some measurements for you but its all a by eye and experience type of thing... how much gravy is in the pan etc....

I usually do okay with amounts.  Sometimes I add too much flour and then add more water to dilute it... and end up with more gravy than expected but that's a good problem to have.  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I just use my flour blend with a pinch of xanthan gum. I keep this on hand for baking to make gravy, make a slurry with it and perfect every time.   I spent a lot of time experimenting with this blend (a little will to bake and a lot of science :) ) it works cup for cup with any recipe gluten free or not (of course with xanthan gum added).  Most of the flours can be found inexpensively at an Asian store or in that aisle at your grocery store.  

 

Flour blend

5 parts white rice flour 5 cups,

1 1/2 parts sorghum flour 1 1/2 cups,

1 1/2 parts sweet rice flour 1 1/2 cups,

4 parts tapioca starch 4 cups

I mix this ahead in a large cereal keeper so I always have it on hand.

Depends what you are making on how much xanthan gum.

xanthan gum (measurements are per cup of flour)

1/2 tsp per cup for cookies, cakes, and cupcakes

¾ tsp for muffins and quick breads

1 to 1 ½ tsp for breads

2 tsp for pizza crust

 

Enjoy!!

 Thank you.  I have all of those flours on hand... might be out of sorghum but I luckily have a whole foods store only a couple of kilometres away that keeps all of these flours in a separate gluten-free, bulk bin area.

 

I'll leave out the xanthan gum for gravy.  I can't imagine that would do anything helpful in gravy, right?


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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 Thank you.  I have all of those flours on hand... might be out of sorghum but I luckily have a whole foods store only a couple of kilometres away that keeps all of these flours in a separate gluten-free, bulk bin area.

 

I'll leave out the xanthan gum for gravy.  I can't imagine that would do anything helpful in gravy, right?

I sometimes use xanthan gum in gravy but just a pinch (like a pinch of salt) to give it some texture but it's not necessary  :) 


*Judy
Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs RE-TESTED ALL FOOD ALLERGIES IN JUNE 2015 AND THEY ARE ALL NEGATIVE NOW!  TIME TO RE-INTRODUCE FISH AND NUTS!!! 
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. c
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010 

Hyperthyroid 2013 - benign tumors and entire thyroid removed

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I use cornstarch -- the choice for Southern Gals! The tip is to use less than what you would use with wheat flour (about half) since it is a pure starch. Mix it well in a bit of cold water to get a nice roux. Then add to the hot drippings. If you dump the cornstarch into the hot drippings you will get lumps.

I usually roast in my cast iron pan and then use all those crunchy pieces and grease for the gravy base when I am letting the roast rest before slicing.


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Mom always used corn starch. Yeah, it gels in the fridge but when you heat it it becomes liquid again. I just make sure when I microwave leftovers to heat the gravy separately and THEN pour it over my meal.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

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I just use brown rice flour or any gluten-free flour that is not a nut flour (no starch to give there), even corn starch is ok but will thicken a lot more than flour.  Put in equal parts (by tablespoons) 2 Tbsp Butter, melted and 2 Tbsp flour per cup of liquid.  Let the melted butter and the flour cook a little bit on medium heat, then when it starts to get nice and liquidy after a few minutes, add the liquid and whisk in, then boil lightly until ready.  Brown rice flour will take longer to release its starches into the gravy than a starchier thing like white rice flour or corn starch.  If you use corn starch try to do half and half that and another flour.  You can always add extra liquid if it is too thick.  This is making a roux, and it makes sure there is no raw flour-y taste, and no lumps in the gravy.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I have been using sweet rice flour for gravies and rouxs.  Use the same amount of sweet rice flour as gluten flour the gravy recipe calls for.

This is how I make chicken gravy :

 

4tbs butter
6tbs sweet rice flour

In saucepan melt better, add flour,  mix for roux
add 4 cups chicken broth

 

I add a chicken bouillon cube, onion powder and poultry seasoning for more flavor
salt and pepper.

If you want a more brown gravy add a splash of Gravy Master it is gluten free.


 

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