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sbojo32

New To All Of This - Questions

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Hi all - I was just diagnosed with Celiac last week and basically just got a call from the doctor saying, "You have Celiac; eat gluten-free and come back in six months." So I've been left to the wonderful world wide web to help me out and there is so much information it's overwhelming.

 

I guess my biggest question is how careful do I have to be when it comes to food? If a product doesn't say gluten-free but doesn't contain wheat (or any gluten) in the ingredient list, is it ok? How concerned do I have to be with "natural flavoring"? For example, in something like ground beef where the ingredient list is simply beef, natural flavoring? What about bulk packages of chicken that say it is in up to 15% chicken broth but doesn't list gluten in the ingredient list?

 

I'm fully prepared to be anal-retentive about label-reading, I just don't know what is ok and what is not.

 

I'm also looking for advice on how to maintain a gluten- and gluten-free kitchen. The rest of my family is not going gluten-free, so I will be preparing gluten-containing meals, usually at the same time as I'm preparing gluten-free meals. This is sometimes as simple as changing out the tortilla (they get wheat tortillas, I get gluten-free), but sometimes involves making pizza with two different crust, making pasta in two separate pots, etc. I purchased a new frying pan, wooden cooking utensils and sponge that are just for me. I don't use the toaster and we don't have a bread machine. Is there anything else I should get/do?

 

Any advice and support is appreciated. Thank you.

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Heres a good place to start

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/#entry913144

In the beginning, I tried to make 2 pastas at once - it's extremely hard and caused too much anxiety. It's hard to not stir one batch with the other spoon, switch the colanders and keep them straight, etc. It worked best when I had someone tend the gluten pan, but I just gave up and we all use gluten free pasta now.


 

 

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My adult son lives with me and he does not have to be gluten free.   He eats gluten free at home except for breads so that he doesn't cross contaminate me and we eat the same meals we had before basically.  His rules for bread are that he has to use a plate and not get crumbs in the butter, jam etc...   You could get your own containers and don't use community condiments.    I don't know how many people you have to feed but it would be easier if everyone did it at home at least for pasta.   Pizza you will be ok with different crusts but be sure you use your own pan.. don't cook them together.    I bake a lot and it's all gluten free and he says he can't tell the difference.  When he is out away from me, he eats what he wants and even when we go out together to a restaurant he gets his own things.      As for the chicken with broth, be careful with any add ins to food.  In the US they are required by law to state wheat but not barley or rye.   It's getting easier to find things that are gluten free in the grocery store and as you probably already know many foods are naturally gluten free.   Meat (not breaded and no gravy) but seasoned well to taste good, fruit, veggies, cheese, milk, yogurt (beware with yogurt of add ins), ice cream...    Mexican food has become my favorite 'out to eat' venue as most everything is ok for me except flour tortillas.  Never got sick yet in  all these years.  

 

I had the same experience, phone call , you have celiac, eat gluten free, see you in 3 months.. and after that 3 month appt nothing.  Never saw the gastro doc again.   :)  Oh forgot about the dietician he sent me to, and he showed up for the appt as well to learn about it and I knew more than she did.. the world wide web is a good teacher  :) 


*Judy
Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs RE-TESTED ALL FOOD ALLERGIES IN JUNE 2015 AND THEY ARE ALL NEGATIVE NOW!  TIME TO RE-INTRODUCE FISH AND NUTS!!! 
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. c
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010 

Hyperthyroid 2013 - benign tumors and entire thyroid removed

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First, I would recommend a different doctor. When I was diagnosed 11 years ago, it was much harder to get good information. Now, many grocery stores (Safeway and Kroger for instance) have lists online of their store brand gluten-free items. So do many major manufacturers. Many products, even from mainstream companies, are clearly marked gluten free...all Chex are gluten free except wheat Chex, for instance.

No, you can't just read labels and assume the absence of wheat means no gluten. Gluten-containing ingredients are often used as binders in things like seasonings. McCormick has a great list and many are marked clearly.

At my house, we cook pasta in two pots and use two colanders because my husband doesn't enjoy gluten free pasta. It works, it just takes more time. We have a toaster with four slots - one for me and the rest for non-celiacs or gluten sensitives. We also have three cutting boards - a big one for gluten free shared foods like meats and vegetables. One for the celiac only and one for non-celtics only. You will discover how sensitive you are. I can!t eat French fries cooked in oil where breaded items have been fried, but I can eat cheesecake with a crust of graham crackers as long as It is a thick cake and I don't eat too close to the crust.

Good luck. It is SO worth it not to eat gluten. My fibromyalgia, which was totally out of control before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, is now under good control with no flare ups unless I get super stressed and/or can't sleep.

Good luck!

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Welcome to the board.  :)

 

Your life will be much much simpler and safer if you can make the majority of your food gluten-free.  All it takes is a crumb and you could be down and out for days.  If they are willing to help you out with your new gluten-free diet at all, I would take them up on it... Gluten, well - any grains really - are not essential nutrients for people.

 

If you do keep a mixed house you will need to protect yourself (and here I disagree with Sweetea888 on a few things):

Do NOT share a toaster - that's not safe at all.  

Do not share butters, spreads, or any condiment that can come in contact with breads of gluten (like squeeze mustard bottles).

No more gluten/wheat flour baking in your home.  That dust can stay airborne for a long time and settle all over your food or utensils.

Be careful of crumbs in the utensil drawer.

Get your own cutting board.

Do not use cooking utensils or pans that have pits or grooves in them that may house trace gluten.

Beware of baking supplies like sugar that have previously had a flour coated spoon dipped into them.... Normal baking really won't be safe for you.

Don't share cooking water (pasta) or nibble around the gluten in food - it isn't always visible.

 

Label reading will usually tell you, honestly, what is in a food.  If in doubt, don't buy something.

 

You'll get the hang of it.  The firts sew weeks are tough but by mid summertime, you'll be a pro.  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Wow, quite a few things I hadn't thought about (also newly diagnosed). Thank you.


Celiac Disease, diagnosed April 1, 2015

Migraines, Esophagitis/Gastritis, Lower Digestive Issues, Osteoporosis, Anxiety, Arthritis, etc--some improving.

DQ2.2 and DQ2.5 trans

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First, I would recommend a different doctor. When I was diagnosed 11 years ago, it was much harder to get good information. Now, many grocery stores (Safeway and Kroger for instance) have lists online of their store brand gluten-free items. So do many major manufacturers. Many products, even from mainstream companies, are clearly marked gluten free...all Chex are gluten free except wheat Chex, for instance.

You will discover how sensitive you are. I can!t eat French fries cooked in oil where breaded items have been fried, but I can eat cheesecake with a crust of graham crackers as long as It is a thick cake and I don't eat too close to the crust.

Good luck. It is SO worth it not to eat gluten. My fibromyalgia, which was totally out of control before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, is now under good control with no flare ups unless I get super stressed and/or can't sleep.

Good luck!

It's not a matter of how sensitive you are - no Celiac expert would recommend you purposefully eat even a tiny amount of gluten - like you get from shared fryers of eating the tops off of a gluten pie, cake, etc. Even if you don't feel it, gluten will stat the immune response and cause damage.

"Eating any gluten, no matter how small an amount, can damage your intestine. This is true for anyone with the disease, including people who do not have noticeable symptoms. It can take weeks for antibody levels (indicating intestinal damage) to normalize after a person with celiac disease has consumed gluten. "

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/living-with-celiac/guide/treatment


 

 

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1. No, you can't just read labels and assume the absence of wheat means no gluten. Gluten-containing ingredients are often used as binders in things like seasonings. McCormick has a great list and many are marked clearly.

 

 

2.  You will discover how sensitive you are. I can!t eat French fries cooked in oil where breaded items have been fried, but I can eat cheesecake with a crust of graham crackers as long as It is a thick cake and I don't eat too close to the crust.

 

1.Wheat can not be used as a binder for food without it being disclosed. It is against FDA regs. Barley or rye would not be used as binders and will be disclosed on the labels. Oats, if tolerated have to be gluten free oats or they are not safe due to high CC risk. 

 

2. PLEASE do not just eat the cheesecake off the the crust or any non gluten item that is baked, fried or served on a gluten one. You cannot pick the filling out of pie, eat the burger that has been in contact with the bun, the filling off a sandwich etc. It is NOT safe. 


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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1.Wheat can not be used as a binder for food without it being disclosed. It is against FDA regs. Barley or rye would not be used as binders and will be disclosed on the labels. Oats, if tolerated have to be gluten free oats or they are not safe due to high CC risk. 

 

2. PLEASE do not just eat the cheesecake off the the crust or any non gluten item that is baked, fried or served on a gluten one. You cannot pick the filling out of pie, eat the burger that has been in contact with the bun, the filling off a sandwich etc. It is NOT safe.

Agreed! Gluten doesn't " hide" or "sneak around". We are talking about the U.S., but Caada, UK, Australia are all similar in that regard. You might find malt or wheat in places you might not expect - soy sauce, licorice, some brand of chocolate ice cream, one brand of enchilada sauce but not another brand, etc - but it is clearly labeled. You just have to remember to read the labels.


 

 

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Agreed! Gluten doesn't " hide" or "sneak around". We are talking about the U.S., but Caada, UK, Australia are all similar in that regard. You might find malt or wheat in places you might not expect - soy sauce, licorice, some brand of chocolate ice cream, one brand of enchilada sauce but not another brand, etc - but it is clearly labeled. You just have to remember to read the labels.

 

To be honest, I think it is even easier up in Canada.  All labels must state if the food MAY contain gluten and wheat, not just if it is added but "may" have it.  The hardest part is remembering to read the label.  LOL


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Agreed! Gluten doesn't " hide" or "sneak around". We are talking about the U.S., but Caada, UK, Australia are all similar in that regard. You might find malt or wheat in places you might not expect - soy sauce, licorice, some brand of chocolate ice cream, one brand of enchilada sauce but not another brand, etc - but it is clearly labeled. You just have to remember to read the labels.

  

To be honest, I think it is even easier up in Canada.  All labels must state if the food MAY contain gluten and wheat, not just if it is added but "may" have it.  The hardest part is remembering to read the label.  LOL

But, it appears I was speaking of the magical kingdom of Caada. I believe it is a very very long car ride north of Kansas! Lol. :)


 

 

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But, it appears I was speaking of the magical kingdom of Caada. I believe it is a very very long car ride north of Kansas! Lol. :)

 

LOL :lol:


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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Hi all - I was just diagnosed with Celiac last week and basically just got a call from the doctor saying, "You have Celiac; eat gluten-free and come back in six months." So I've been left to the wonderful world wide web to help me out and there is so much information it's overwhelming.

 

I guess my biggest question is how careful do I have to be when it comes to food? If a product doesn't say gluten-free but doesn't contain wheat (or any gluten) in the ingredient list, is it ok? How concerned do I have to be with "natural flavoring"? For example, in something like ground beef where the ingredient list is simply beef, natural flavoring? What about bulk packages of chicken that say it is in up to 15% chicken broth but doesn't list gluten in the ingredient list?

 

I'm fully prepared to be anal-retentive about label-reading, I just don't know what is ok and what is not.

 

I'm also looking for advice on how to maintain a gluten- and gluten-free kitchen. The rest of my family is not going gluten-free, so I will be preparing gluten-containing meals, usually at the same time as I'm preparing gluten-free meals. This is sometimes as simple as changing out the tortilla (they get wheat tortillas, I get gluten-free), but sometimes involves making pizza with two different crust, making pasta in two separate pots, etc. I purchased a new frying pan, wooden cooking utensils and sponge that are just for me. I don't use the toaster and we don't have a bread machine. Is there anything else I should get/do?

 

Any advice and support is appreciated. Thank you.

I found an ebook that has spared me much misery in the way that there are ingredients I never would have guessed would cause inflammation and pain due to its gluten content such as caramel coloring (found in colas). The book is Celiac Disease Safe/Unsafe Food List and Essential Information by Jaqui Karr C.S.N., C.V.D. I am new to this too but have learned that even minute amounts have a profound effect and I have to be extremely cautious. I have this book on my nook and take it with me to the grocery store. I feel the best when I only eat fruit, vegetables and chicken (chicken that has not been juiced or injected that is) and no grains of any kind. Beware of salad dressings many contain hidden gluten ingredients I like Drews or else just a spritz of olive oil or lemon juice and salt. Another thing I do is to keep spreads, dips and peanutbutter separate from my husband after seeing him make a sandwich and double dip (lol he insists he doesn't but he does) and it was a source of contamination. Good luck to you I know I have been helped a lot reading from this forum.

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I found an ebook that has spared me much misery in the way that there are ingredients I never would have guessed would cause inflammation and pain due to its gluten content such as caramel coloring (found in colas). The book is Celiac Disease Safe/Unsafe Food List and Essential Information by Jaqui Karr C.S.N., C.V.D. I am new to this too but have learned that even minute amounts have a profound effect and I have to be extremely cautious. I have this book on my nook and take it with me to the grocery store. I feel the best when I only eat fruit, vegetables and chicken (chicken that has not been juiced or injected that is) and no grains of any kind. Beware of salad dressings many contain hidden gluten ingredients I like Drews or else just a spritz of olive oil or lemon juice and salt. Another thing I do is to keep spreads, dips and peanutbutter separate from my husband after seeing him make a sandwich and double dip (lol he insists he doesn't but he does) and it was a source of contamination. Good luck to you I know I have been helped a lot reading from this forum.

 

In the USA, caramel coloring is made with corn, therefore does not contain gluten.  There are many other things in processed foods that may cause digestive distress, but it is not from that ingredient, as it does not contain gluten. Here is a great index of ingredients that may be more reliable for your use: http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free-foods/ingredients/ingredients-index/


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I was just diagnosed yesterday and am pretty nervous about all this disease entails.... thank you for all the answers that I have found on this page!!!

 

Welcome to the group!  :)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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