Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

sbojo32

Cooking With Flour

Recommended Posts

I've seen this answered before, but my family doesn't believe me. I have Celiac (diagnosed 2.5 weeks ago) and so I've been eating gluten-free since then. The rest of my family isn't going gluten-free, but they ask if they can make regular pancakes in the house. I know I shouldn't cook with regular flour or "airborne gluten" but what can they do?

 

I suggested they go outside to measure the pancake mix and get it in a bowl with wet ingredients so it wouldn't be airborne in the house and they thought I was being crazy (no one ended up with pancakes).

 

Also, is the griddle ok if it's been cleaned with soap and water after making gluten pancakes to make gluten-free pancakes?

 

This relates to any food with flour, but pancakes just came up so I wanted to ask. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Pick up some gluten-free Bisquik and make that pancake recipe.  I have fed that to gluten eaters and they didn't mind at all.  As for the airborne flour issue, I think your suggestion of mixing it outside is the best practice to avoid any airborne gluten eventually settling all over the countertops and exposed clean cookware.  If the griddle is a perfectly smooth surface with no nooks, crannies, or greasy film for the gluten to stick to, then you are probably okay just washing it well.  However, I would be more comfortable with a separate pan, especially if dealing with a well-seasoned cast iron type griddle.  A non-stick one that needs no seasoning would be easier to clean.

 

However, the best way to deal with something like that is just have everyone eat gluten-free pancakes.  People have this thing in their mind that gluten-free food equals gross, but many people are surprised that after long refusing gluten-free food, that when they try it, it isn't bad.  It is just a human nature thing to not want to try something new.  Most people drown their pancakes in syrup anyways, they may not even tell a difference.  And yes, this does relate to any food with flour.  They can purchase pre-made gluten baked goods, when making it in the house would involve a mix and/or flour.  If you would like to demonstrate to them how flour can go airborne, get a bag of gluten-free bisquik or whatever gluten-free flour you have, set it on the stove with the top cut off, and smack both sides to poof some out, and after a few minutes, have them run their hands over the adjacent counters.  They will probably be shocked and never again object to your suggestion of mixing the pancakes outside.

 

They also sell pre-made pancakes in the freezer section they can eat.  But I am pretty sure freshly made gluten-free pancakes would taste better than processed junk from the freezer.  Just have them give it a try.  It takes a while for other household members to "get it" so it is good that they would up not making pancakes at all this time.  They sound like they will be able to understand with some more time and info :)


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Regular wheat flour is banned in my house although it's just my son and I. I have Celiac he doesn't (yet)  The reason is that when you are mixing pancakes, cake, anything really, the dust from the flour can stay in the air as long as 4 hours which inhaled flour is just as bad for a person with Celiac as eating it.  So we buy my son regular bread from the bakery and he has to not double did the knife in butter, peanut butter etc.. I make gluten free baked goods and he likes then as much or better than the regular kind.  Even my friends that are not gluten free ask me to bring cupcakes or cookies to get togethers   :)   So once you've been in this a while it will get easier.  In the meantime, if they want pancakes you can buy a mix that is in a bottle that they just add water or milk to and then it would be contained in the bottle so it may not get as much in the air.   Just a thought.   It is nice that my son is able to do gluten free with me except for his bread and an occasional pack of cookies.  It makes life a lot easier.   He likes brown rice pasta so we're good there.    My older son and family will be here to visit for a week tomorrow and they have the same rules when it comes to cross contamination.  They are vegetarian and I don't sprinkle meat juice on their food   :)     Good luck 

 

Just found this:  The problem is that when you breath it in through your mouth and nose, those particles of flour can become trapped in your saliva and mucus and then be swallowed.  At that point it enters your digestive system.  The Gluten Intolerance Group says that flour can hang in the air up to 24 hours. That’s a long time. 


*Judy
Food allergies to fish, seafood, tree nuts, aspartame(Equal),flax seed, and many drugs RE-TESTED ALL FOOD ALLERGIES IN JUNE 2015 AND THEY ARE ALL NEGATIVE NOW!  TIME TO RE-INTRODUCE FISH AND NUTS!!! 
Stomach issues since childhood
Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) age 6-44
Diabetes age 44 to present now going back to Hypoglycemia since gluten free.
Diagnosed with Fibromyalgia in 2005 and it's gone now that I'm aspartame and gluten free. c
Celiac disease- negative test in 2009, positive tests in Nov. 2010
Gluten free started 11/08/2010
Genetic tests positive- DQ2, positive -DQ6 (?) negative- DQ8 11/15/2010 

Hyperthyroid 2013 - benign tumors and entire thyroid removed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

My husband actually goes on the back deck to pour out the pancake mix. I always had to come back a while later and re- wipe the counters from the dust. He uses the old pancake griddle we always used for the gluten pancakes. If you think your griddle can be cleaned well, it should be fine for gluten and gluten-free things.


 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Pamelas baking mix is another good one for gluten-free pancakes. I'm very strict about my kitchen. I've replaced everything that could be contaminated from past use.

The only gluten containing food allowed to be cooked are microwave items.

Keeps me healthy and my kitchen not contaminated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

Pamelas is my other favorite pancake mix!   For some reason the recipe on the bag seems to be way too much milk for thick, fluffy pancakes.  Hold back like a third of it if you like your pancakes thicker.  I really like the taste of those the best.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

If they don't want to mix it outside, suggest they go to a restaurant for their pancakes, and tell them that at home they can have french toast or eggs. If they DO agree to mix it outside, have them ix up a really HUGE batch. You can cook a ton of pancakes and freeze the leftovers. Leftover pancakes heated on a cookie sheet in the oven are even better than fresh ones. The edges get crispy and the center is just as fluffy as the first time.


gluten-free since June, 2011

It took 3 !/2 years but my intolerances to corn, soy, and everything else (except gluten) are gone!

Life is good!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

That is also a good idea what Bartfull said.  I tell my husband he can have his gluten outside of the house, lol.  And he does, when we go out.


I am my husband's "Silly Yak Girl" :)

I was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in January 2013. I also have Lupus and Common Variable Immunodeficiency(CVID) for which I am on IVIG.

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter

my husband can have all the gluten out of the house that he would like. I have a strict gluten free home, and can't imagine the anxiety I would feel if anyone made gluteny food here. i have to be able to be safe at home.  my kids are grown and out of the house, so it's just the 2 of us most days. 


gluten free since 11/12  

dairy and soy free since 1/13

chocolate free since 6/14

 

I miss my chocolate!!!   but I'm not sick anymore, and that's what really matters  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join eNewsletter



Join eNewsletter