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If You Are Dairy Intolerant, What Are Your Symptoms?

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We're trying to figure out if our 4 year old is having issues with dairy, but I'm not sure what to look for.  How did you know you couldn't tolerate dairy?  I've tried to make her dairy free for the last few days, but she still complains of "tummy aches".   I don't want to take away her milk and cheese (which is devastating for her) if we don't need to.  I'd love some input on this one! 

 

Thanks!


Mom to 2 young kids with celiac, diagnosed March 2015

*Gluten free household

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Before i quit Dairy! I personally got IBS with in 30 minutes of eating lactose! Followed by joint pain and irritability. Watch how often they go to the bathroom and what it looks like! You will know if it's a healthy poop or not! Try vegan cheese, kefir and coconut milk as dairy replacements. I personally stay away from animal milk. A mammal drinking another species of mammals milk.....cringe!

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I tend to get stomachaches and I think my (adult- age 30+ -onset) acne is set off by it.  I don't know if I am dairy (protein) intolerant or just lactose intolerant - I suspect the later.  I tend to do okay with hard, aged cheeses but ice cream is a problem.  

 

I don't like milk much and haven't wanted to drink it for years, so that is easy to skip.  I used to get quite raw, sharp stomachache from milk... It's funny, when I was a young child my mother took me to the doctor about my stomachaches after meals.  He said I was  "one of those people who got stomachaches after they ate" and to drink milk after a meal to help sooth my stomach..... Yeah, that was helpful.   :blink:

 

I was able to eat cheese again after being gluten-free for just over a year.  I need to eat lactase if I want to try ice cream.

 

About half of all celiacs get pain from milk in the first 6 months after diagnosis.  Many regain the ability to eat milk, but some, like me, never can go back to it fully.  I would strongly consider removing dairy from your kids' diets in the first half year or so gluten-free.  You can make substitutions fun.  Try fruit smoothies with protein powder or coconut yogurt if you are worried about losing protein and fats.  There are some cheese substitutes out there.  There are some soy ones that aren't bad but I tend to avoid soy as much as possible.  Daiya makes a good cheese substitute for cooking or grilled cheese sandwiches, but raw ... I don't like it so much.  Nutritional yeast  is not a bad stand in for parmesan.

 

Good luck.


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I discovered quite quickly that I could not tolerate ice cream, cheese etc, and would have stomach ache and need the bathroom quite quickly after eating these foods.  Then I discovered I could not tolerate Casein too, I found this out by using a creamer in my coffee which was lactose free but unbeknown to me contained Casein, Casein is the protein in milk.   I think it is probably quite rare for a  child to have Casein intolerance,  but it can happen, and so I would keep her off milk for a while to see what happens.  Unfortunately  the symptoms of Casein intolerance were far worst for me than lactose intolerance and it looked like and felt like a really severe allergy, with hives, itchy skin, flutterings in my chest, streaming itchy eyes, sneezing, nose drip,and stomach ache.


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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...  Unfortunately  the symptoms of Casein intolerance were far worst for me than lactose intolerance and it looked like and felt like a really severe allergy, with hives, itchy skin, flutterings in my chest, streaming itchy eyes, sneezing, nose drip,and stomach ache.

 

To me, that sounds like it could be a milk allergy.  As far as I understand it, casein intolerance generally has symptoms similar to celiac disease. (I looked into it when researching diet for a family member with Aspergers)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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To me, that sounds like it could be a milk allergy.  As far as I understand it, casein intolerance generally has symptoms similar to celiac disease. (I looked into it when researching diet for a family member with Aspergers)

Ha! you have me confused now, as I thought a milk allergy WAS an intolerance to casein...this is what I found on Go Dairy Free..Maybe I am missing something here...  :)

 

http://www.godairyfree.org/dairy-free-information/milk-allergies-mild-to-life-threatening

 

What Exactly is a Milk Allergy?

Although they are often muddled together in conversation, milk allergies and lactose intolerance are quite different. A food allergy is identified as an abnormal and heightened response of the immune system to certain components (most notably proteins) within a food. In milk, the two leading allergy offenders are the milk proteins known as casein and whey. Casein is the curd that forms when milk is left to sour. Whey is the watery part that is left after the curd is removed


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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Ha! you have me confused now, as I thought a milk allergy WAS an intolerance to casein...this is what I found on Go Dairy Free..Maybe I am missing something here...  :)

 

http://www.godairyfree.org/dairy-free-information/milk-allergies-mild-to-life-threatening

 

What Exactly is a Milk Allergy?

Although they are often muddled together in conversation, milk allergies and lactose intolerance are quite different. A food allergy is identified as an abnormal and heightened response of the immune system to certain components (most notably proteins) within a food. In milk, the two leading allergy offenders are the milk proteins known as casein and whey. Casein is the curd that forms when milk is left to sour. Whey is the watery part that is left after the curd is removed

 

I'm not an expert so I could get this confused:

 

A food allergy is an Immunoglobulin E (IgE) reaction to something (food or something like mold) that causes a histamine reaction (stuffy nose and itchy eyes).  A food sensitivity (intolerance) is not an allergy but some sort of (usually digestive) problem that your body has with a food.  Some doctors believe it is IgG related.  It is an immune reaction, but unlike celiac disease, it is not an autoimmune disease.

 

Basically, it comes down to a different type of reaction to a food.  We do know that allergic reactions and food intolerances are both miserable situations to be in.  ;)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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"Basically, it comes down to a different type of reaction to a food.  We do know that allergic reactions and food intolerances are both miserable situations to be in"

 

 

Yes, I absolutely agree, its no fun!


Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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I'm not an expert so I could get this confused:

 

A food allergy is an Immunoglobulin E (IgE) reaction to something (food or something like mold) that causes a histamine reaction (stuffy nose and itchy eyes).  

 

 

It's a little more than "stuffy nose and itchy eyes".  Food allergies commonly result in anaphylactic reactions which can be fatal. If you kid had a dairy allergy, you would know (likes like vomiting and diarrhea, hives, breathing difficulties and so on) from immediately to 2 hours after ingestion of the offending food.  Environmental allergies are more like what you are talking about with stuffy nose and itchy eyes.

 

An intolerance is typically GI in nature.  There aren't tests that can be done for that aside from removing the food and seeing if they symptoms resolve. 

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True.  I just mentioned those because they are the common symptoms, sort of like stomachaches is for celiac disease.  My brother had a dairy allergy that was non-life threatening, with very similar symptoms to Zebra007.

 

Some doctors do IgG tests for food sensitivities, but they aren't widely medically accepted.


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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While allergies do run on a spectrum, if the person doesn't need to carry epi pens because they could die from exposure, allergy isn't the correct term.  IgE allergies are diagnosis with testing that isn't all that accurate and clinical presentation.  If the Dr. isn't sending you out the door with a script for epi's then it's an intolerance.  Same treatment in avoiding but obviously very different results from exposure.

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 If the Dr. isn't sending you out the door with a script for epi's then it's an intolerance.  

 

I've not actually read that before, bt then again, I'm not widely read on allergies/ IgE reactions.... Something new for me to look up.  :)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I don't know that my experience will be that helpful since I didn't know I had an intolerance to dairy for most of my life and I imagine that the noticeable symptoms differ in different age groups. But the symptoms that I now recognize to be from dairy intolerance were; sinus problems (usually congestion), fatigue (not debilitating, but I had a noticeable energy boost when I gave up dairy), and diarrhea. For me, the GI problems would typically take 12 or more hours to develop (which is why I didn't realize for so long that they were linked to dairy). 

 

I'm not sure this statement is true:

"While allergies do run on a spectrum, if the person doesn't need to carry epi pens because they could die from exposure, allergy isn't the correct term.  IgE allergies are diagnosis with testing that isn't all that accurate and clinical presentation.  If the Dr. isn't sending you out the door with a script for epi's then it's an intolerance.  Same treatment in avoiding but obviously very different results from exposure."

 

You can be allergic and not be in danger of anaphylaxis. If exposure to something gives you a histamine reaction that includes hives larger than 3mm, that is considered an allergy according to the allergist I met with a couple of months ago. So while I am allergic to grass because it can cause me to break out into hives, it is not considered a life-threatening allergy and I have no need to carry an epi-pen. I have a dairy intolerance. I have a grass allergy. Clear as mud? lol

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While allergies do run on a spectrum, if the person doesn't need to carry epi pens because they could die from exposure, allergy isn't the correct term.  IgE allergies are diagnosis with testing that isn't all that accurate and clinical presentation.  If the Dr. isn't sending you out the door with a script for epi's then it's an intolerance.  Same treatment in avoiding but obviously very different results from exposure.

I am not an allergy expert, but I spent years with an allergist. I never was given an epi pen. The only time I had an anaphylactic episode was with medications. The fix is easy -- never ingest them again (I.e. Aspirin, ibuprofen). I am allergic to pollens, mold, cold temperatures, grasses, latex, garlic, nuts, cat dander, etc. I get intestinal pain, hives, vomiting, itchy skin and eyes, nose congestion, etc. Antihistamines help. I always have them on hand. My nieces carry epi pens because they are allergic to nuts, as is their father (asthma) and me, but they never had a severe reaction to nuts. I think doctors issue them more for liability reasons and the fact that they just don't know when that allergen exposure is going to morph into anaphylaxis. Other brother is 50 and has been stung by wasps and bees for years without issues, yet a sting from a yellow jacket almost killed him last summer. He could not breathe, hives broke out on his back, face swelled tremendously at the site, and he passed out. He now has an epi pen.

From what I have read, there are various degrees of allergies. Nothing is concrete. I understand that your son has severe anaphylactic allergies, but just because you do not carry an epi pen does not mean you can not really be allergic to something.

The good news that I would like to share is that by treating for celiac disease, my allergies have greatly diminished. Even my cold urticaria seems to be gone. I have NOT tested ibuprofen and have no plans to do so.


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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I have Urticeria on my forehead at the moment, it's been there for about 2 weeks now,  and I have lost weight recently, because everything I eat has to be scrutinized and scribbled in my food diary as new and strange food allergies pop up!! I have found I cannot eat gluten-free Oats, Eggs, Tea and coffee, and other stuff!!  if I get it wrong, I feel ill and acid reflux rears its head!!   Its tough after going  Gluten and Dairy free, and then find I am still having to wade through new and odd food allergies.  
 
Something odd happened last night which frightened me.   I have a perfume allergy, and have been using homeopathy drops which have proved to be quite useful, as I am able to go shopping without returning with a migraine, however my daughter visited the other day and whilst she was not wearing perfume, the dress she had on still had remnants of perfume, and  sitting next to her all day caused a bad headache...Later In the night I remember waking  up quite sharply, and noticed that my hands were shaking violently, which seemed to go away after I got up to use the bathroom..I just wondered if this was allergy based, and was linked to the perfume allergy.
 
I was tested for Mast Cell, Thyroid, diabetes, Vitamin Deficienty, and all is fine on that score. I am going to see an allergist, but only because I'm desperate, knowing full well that these food allergy tests arent always conclusive, but that is not until August, as incredibly there is only ONE allergist available that people can use where I live.

Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis Feb 2014 (in remission)

Diagnosed Lichen Schlerosus May 2014

Diagnosed GERD Aug 2014  

Gluten free from Sept 2014

Dairy free from Dec 2014

Sulfite free from Sept 2015

 

 

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We're trying to figure out if our 4 year old is having issues with dairy, but I'm not sure what to look for.  How did you know you couldn't tolerate dairy?  I've tried to make her dairy free for the last few days, but she still complains of "tummy aches".   I don't want to take away her milk and cheese (which is devastating for her) if we don't need to.  I'd love some input on this one! 

 

Thanks!

 

Her symptoms may not disappear in just a few days.  It depends on what the situation in her gut is to begin with, and also what kind of reaction she is having.  If her gut is inflamed and irritated by something other than dairy, the symptoms may not change at all.  Or if the problem is dairy and some other food also, eliminating just one of the irritants may not resolve the symptoms.  If your whole house is on fire and you put out the fire in one room, that doesn't mean the house is ok.

 

Usually lactose intolerance causes symptoms including bloating and flatulance, possibly constipation and diahhrea, possibly pain and discomfort.  If I did eat dairy I'd get all those fun symptoms.  In addition I'd get abdominal pain, and some bleeding with bowel movements.  I most likely have a casein intolerance as well as lactose intolerance.  The symptoms for me would take a week or 2 to resolve mostly.  Removing foods to test for food intolerances is best done for a sufficient time to remove any doubt.  Two weeks is a pretty good test IMHO.  But that's only if you know there are no other foods causing problems.  If you don't know that, then removing foods one at a time can be pretty unreliable.


Proverbs 25:16 "Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it."

Job 30:27 My bowels boiled, and rested not: the days of affliction prevented me.

Thyroid cyst and nodules, Lactose / casein intolerant. Diet positive, gene test pos, symptoms confirmed by Dr-head. My current bad list is: gluten, dairy, sulfites, coffee (the devil's brew), tea, Bug's Bunnies carrots, garbanzo beans of pain, soy- no joy, terrible turnips, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, eggplant, celery, strawberries, pistachios, and hard work. Have a good day! 🙂 Paul

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Instead of depression I get angry and restless. About an hour after eating it. It took me a long time to realise and somebody else pointed it out initially. It was also a bit confusing because I felt so euphoric to have another food back in the menu that I feel super optimistic somewhere in amongst the anger. Which makes for a mega-moodswing... 
I get chestpain (maybe it's heartburn, I don't know), anxiety and frustration and if I've eaten more than a bit I get a migraine about 3 hours later. Every time. Goats. Sheeps. Cultured. Aged. Not aged. Not cultured. Whatever. Migraine. Epic.
I usually can't sleep, too.
I get no GI symptoms though. Nothing...
It's funny now how consistent that reaction is yet how unnoticed it went for a long time. Amongst the other crappy feelings...

Maybe I'll try just butter, though. Maybe it's the proteins...
I hope dairy can be included again soon but also do acknowledge we don't 'need' it and was just reading a great article in the (mainstream!) New Scientist about how it messes with us unless it's yoghurt or cheese. Intrigue. Tasty and practical intrigue...

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