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Fake Gluten Free

Labelled As 'gluten Free' But Not Really So?

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I have grown dobuts on certain products and groceries that are labelled as Gluten free becaue I get reactions from them.

 

It might be just irritable from previous exposure to gluten

 

However, I am more than certain to avoid these self-claiming gluten free stuff when I get reactions repetitively.

 

The following I have problem with:

 

Xyla - sesame teriyaki sauce

Simply Natural - organic honey mustard dressing

 

I am curious to find out if anyone has similar experience (so I can avoid those)!

 

 

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If I avoided everything others told me they were sure had glutened them - I would be dead in minutes  - I have heard air, water, tampons, foods tested by reputable companies at <5 ppm, the inside of bananas and oranges, etc.   :blink:


 

 

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There are a few ingredients in those two products that I reacted to when I was first diagnosed: xanthan gum, garlic, and onions. I still can not tolerate garlic or onions even after being gluten free for two years. I would suspect that you could be intolerant to Xylitol too. Just something to think about.

Consider making your own dressings from scratch.


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I was going to guess xylitol too.  The artificial sweeteners can often cause stomach upset and the D.

 

Welcome to the board.  :)


Nicole 

"Acceptance is the key to happiness."

ITP - 1993

Celiac - June, 2012

Hypothyroid - August, 2012

CANADIAN

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I have always been a grocery store label-reader but have been hoodwinked a few times since having to go gluten-free (it's been about 5 weeks now) when I've brought home products labeled 'gluten free' only to read the tiny print and find they were processed in facilities where wheat products are also processed.  Naturally I wonder how safe can these be.  Should they be avoided altogether?  I have put them on our non-gluten-free shelf if I catch it before it gets to my mouth ; ), but I have also discovered it after the fact.  I don't often experience a reaction, though.  I am interested to hear others' thoughts about this.  Thank you!

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Things labelled gluten-free are often tested and will have a little symbol to show what group they have a certification from.   I eat them.  

 

Some thoughts - you could call the companies and see what they actually mean by "shared facility".  I have found that sometimes the gluten product is processed no where near the gluten-free.  The gluten-free might have a separate area for all the storage, processing and packaging.  Sometimes they are even in separate buildings but in the same "complex" or separate rooms.  

 

That statement is not legally necessary in the US, so you may be eating products made in shared facilities and not know it.

 

Products with flour - like bread or cookies would be more concerning as flour flies everywhere.  But ice cream made on separate machines from the ones that mix in gluteny Oreos wouldn't have the same concern.


 

 

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If you are in the early stages of healing remember that it is not always a glutening that makes you sick.  You may be reacting to other ingredients that are in the food product.  If you are having trouble I would encourage you to avoid processed foods and eat the clean natural ones.  That way you have no question that what you are eating is safe! 

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Thank you both for taking the time to respond here.   We eat a pretty 'clean' diet - very little processed food any more -- but things like canned refried beans and salad dressings, certified gluten-free or labeled gluten-free, are still on the menu without any problems so far.

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Not so thoughtful reply:

 

If I avoided everything others told me they were sure had glutened them - I would be dead in minutes  - I have heard air, water, tampons, foods tested by reputable companies at <5 ppm, the inside of bananas and oranges, etc.   :blink:

 

Thoughtful reply:

 

Things labelled gluten-free are often tested and will have a little symbol to show what group they have a certification from.   I eat them.  

 

Some thoughts - you could call the companies and see what they actually mean by "shared facility".  I have found that sometimes the gluten product is processed no where near the gluten-free.  The gluten-free might have a separate area for all the storage, processing and packaging.  Sometimes they are even in separate buildings but in the same "complex" or separate rooms.  

 

That statement is not legally necessary in the US, so you may be eating products made in shared facilities and not know it.

 

Products with flour - like bread or cookies would be more concerning as flour flies everywhere.  But ice cream made on separate machines from the ones that mix in gluteny Oreos wouldn't have the same concern.

 

 

This is supposed to be a safe place for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease to come and hopefully find answers to a VERY confusing disease and even more confusing industrialized food industry.  There are enough forums out there with their fair share snarky responses, and this one shouldn’t never be one of them. 

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Not so thoughtful reply:

 

 

Thoughtful reply:

 

 

 

This is supposed to be a safe place for those diagnosed with Celiac Disease to come and hopefully find answers to a VERY confusing disease and even more confusing industrialized food industry.  There are enough forums out there with their fair share snarky responses, and this one shouldn’t never be one of them. 

 

 

Sorry you didn't care for my answers.  The sad fact is that avoiding foods others claim glutened them will leave you with nothing to eat.  Another sad fact is that I have seen people insist that pretty much anything has gluten in it and newbies believe them.  Many later found out it wasn't gluten bothering them, but their posts about oranges and bananas containing gluten, live on to confuse newbies forever more.   :(


 

 

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That was the OP’s original and only post so far, hopefully they are still here and will continue to visit for help and answers.

I agree, and as it is finding meals of substance out there is challenging enough. Hopefully most can decipher for themselves what is good and bad information.  But as we all know gluten is hidden in a lot of product, envelope glue, the glue on the first paper towel possibly, lip balm, certain flavoring and so on.  So, some of the accusations may in fact be true.

I also agree that there are some other products and ingredients that may be suspect, for example inulin, or even soy, and when I was first dealing with this new diet I’d would have been convinced I was gluten’d somehow or somewhere.     

And going back to my Talenti post for a second, I was only trying to supply new information that was provided to me about their new labeling.  If you’re comfortable eating a product that once said “gluten free” that is fine.  I for one am not, the last thing I want to do is continuously check some corporate website to make sure they didn’t change an ingredient over night.  It was simply provide information to the forum.  And yes, those two words mean everything me.

 

Thank you for being a moderator for this fourm, because this website has been very helpful to many.

 

Cheers
 

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Kareng is right.....there is so much misinformation on the internet about Celiac Disease, this is where the confusion comes from.  Celiac is not a confusing disease by itself.

There are many great books out there, written by medical professionals who have a background in nutrition and the human body, with all you need to know about how to manage this disease.  Unfortunately, too many people do not read them. 

 

The most basic information a person can take away with them once diagnosed is that, in the beginning, you will react to foods that have no gluten content. You are healing and it takes more time than most people can fathom because they are used to taking a pill and feeling better in 24 hours.  If you react to a food, then do not eat it again for awhile and stick to whole foods.  I can assure you that down the road, you will be eating many more foods again you could not tolerate at diagnosis.

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But as we all know gluten is hidden in a lot of product, envelope glue, the glue on the first paper towel possibly, lip balm, certain flavoring and so on.  So, some of the accusations may in fact be true

 

This is what I am talking about........the envelope glue and paper towel glue do not contain gluten.......but I can only speak for those living in the US and I would suspect, Canada.  They use glue, not gluten.  Lip balm may contain gluten but many do not.  You have to learn to read a label correctly or yes, call the manufacturer.  There are also many flavorings which do not contain any gluten.  If there was that much "hidden gluten" in products, no one would heal.  It all comes down to experience and time living with Celiac and learning about food ingredients. 

 

There is definitely work involved with a Celiac diagnosis and work involved with living with this disease but it's very do-able.  If nothing else, it teaches poeple how to eat much better than they normally would have and that's a good thing!

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Kareng is right.....there is so much misinformation on the internet about Celiac Disease, this is where the confusion comes from.  Celiac is not a confusing disease by itself.

There are many great books out there, written by medical professionals who have a background in nutrition and the human body, with all you need to know about how to manage this disease.  Unfortunately, too many people do not read them. 

 

 

Celiac Disease is not confusing by itself?  I guess that is why so many doctors get the diagnosis right the first time or why 10 people with Celiac Disease will have 10 different reactions or 10 different responses to cross contamination.

The point of my original response was to simply remind everyone to go easy on some of the questions and posts and not to debate whether or not there is good information on the internet regarding Celiac.

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This is what I am talking about........the envelope glue and paper towel glue do not contain gluten.......but I can only speak for those living in the US and I would suspect, Canada.  They use glue, not gluten.  Lip balm may contain gluten but many do not.  You have to learn to read a label correctly or yes, call the manufacturer.  There are also many flavorings which do not contain any gluten.  If there was that much "hidden gluten" in products, no one would heal.  It all comes down to experience and time living with Celiac and learning about food ingredients. 

 

There is definitely work involved with a Celiac diagnosis and work involved with living with this disease but it's very do-able.  If nothing else, it teaches poeple how to eat much better than they normally would have and that's a good thing!

 

And your reply is what I am talking about.

Since I was diagnosed in 2007 and going off the information provided then this is what I came across:

Even beyond blogs, the “gluten in adhesives” myth has been present in a variety of reputable sources. Back in 2006, an article in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice—with the Mayo Clinic’s Joseph Murray as coauthor—made the warning. More recently, an article in The Nurse Practitioner: The American Journal of Primary Healthcare did the same thing. A quick Internet search will find oodles and oodles of other examples. But is it true?


http://nogluten-noproblem.com/2013/02/lick-it-up-the-truth-about-envelopes-stamps-and-gluten.html

Sorry, for not being abreast of the glue industries recent claims.

 

If I want to get into a pissing match I'll go to my boat, truck, or any other special interest forums out there and I will repeat it, this forum should not be one of them.

 

I wish for everyone to have a wonderful day.

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To the Original Poster - I am sorry this thread was hijacked. Unfortunately,  sometimes that happens on an open forum like this.   :angry:

 

It sounds like you did get a few good ideas.  If you have more questions or comments, please let us know.  You can either continue on here or start a new topic.  


 

 

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