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jddh

Glutentox Tested Foods

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While dealing with some stubborn symptoms that have persisted despite a “gluten-zero” diet (I’ve discovered I used to make some mistakes here and there without obvious reactions), I’ve bought a whole bunch of GlutenTox test strips to be absolutely sure some suspect foods are safe.

 
These test kits are widely approved for used in the food industry, and they can detect gluten down to 5ppm—pretty accurate! They are the surest way I know to guarantee a product is free of gluten contamination.
 
They cost a bundle and I hope to not have to use them for long. However, since I’m using them mostly on commercial products, I thought I would keep a thread of products that I’ve tested for your information.
 
You’ll see that most of these are confirmed safe, but I for one appreciated the 100% confirmation. Many of the products may be localized to BC, Canada. I hope you will benefit from it.
 
[EDIT—discussion about the validity of these tests in the thread below]
 
FALSE means a negative test—no gluten detected.
 
Udi’s Breads—various kinds
FALSE
(shocker)
 
Jamieson vitamins D, A & E
FALSE
 
Cotazym brand “MKF” (Canada)
FALSE
 
Domperidone brand “SNS” (Canada)
FALSE
 
Mirtazapine brand “SDZ” (Canada)
FALSE
 
Iberogast
FALSE
 
Taste Adventure curry lentil soup mix
FALSE
 
Amy’s Organic Refried Beans
FALSE
HOWEVER they note their facility also processes wheat…
 
Zatoun Za’atar (Palestinian spice)
TRUE!
 
Extra Strength Tylenol
FALSE
 
London Drugs acetaminophen 500mg
FALSE
 
European Foods Polish-Style mayonnaise
FALSE
 
Better Than Bouillon—Beef, Chicken, Vegetable
FALSE
 
Shwartz’s Montreal Smoked Meat
FALSE
 
Preferisco Organic Balsamic Vinegar
FALSE
 
EverFit L-Glutamine supplement
FALSE
 
Cineplex movie popcorn with butter topping
FALSE!

33 y/o male

Celiac and proud since 2007 - endoscopy/biopsy

Confirmed HLA genes 2014

Strict gluten-free diet since diagnosis

Post-eating nausea despite diet began Aug 2014

 

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Pretty interesting but I would be wary of completely trusting your "jddh" approved foods list! Ha!

Hey, what exactly is Polish Mayonnaise? I am of Plish decent, but live on the US West Coast. I recall my Grandma shipping food to Poland for years (post WWII). When she visited in the 70's, they served her tuna that she had sent. it was not presented as tuna salad as we know it. They knew nothing of mayonnaise. She started sending jars of mayonnaise after that. Maybe the product you are referring to was developed much later or it was not being produced under the Communist regime. Everything was hard to come by back then. Hence our packages that were sent for decades.


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Well I wouldn't trust my old diet either, but believe you me, I'm careful now. I started ordering these test kits through a recommend by a food scientist when I was ruling out refractory and looking for hidden gluten. I don't know of anything better than this test; my father challenged it at the 5ppm setting with a tiny pinch of breadcrumbs added to a mash of otherwise gluten-free food; the test showed bright red, a positive.

 

I don't have any of that mayonnaise in the fridge at the moment, nor could I find a website for them. They're a local BC company. But here's a random youtube link discussing the very product: 


33 y/o male

Celiac and proud since 2007 - endoscopy/biopsy

Confirmed HLA genes 2014

Strict gluten-free diet since diagnosis

Post-eating nausea despite diet began Aug 2014

 

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jddh, I think there may be more to it than just using a test strip where "one size fits all". I am a member of The Gluten Free Watchdog

and have learned much about the testing of different foods for gluten. It isn't as easy as it seems. Early on when i went gluten free I began to suspect certain foods of containing gluten & got some of the test strips - the more popular, more reliably touted ones. it made me feel good to know the items I tested, tested clean. I have learned a great deal since then and would not rely on a test strip to determine if a food is or is not gluten free. There are so many different factors to consider when testing. The make up of the food makes a big difference in whether test method a or test method b or test method c is the correct way to test that particular food. Please take a look at this link and read the individual articles on there especially the ones about lateral flow devices.

http://www.glutenfreedietitian.com/category/testing-food-for-gluten/


Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2018

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Thanks for the info squirmingitch, that's fascinating. I certainly agree prima facie that home-kit tests can't be 100% relied upon, and the arguments by that RD are compelling. Just about everything I test is SUPPOSED to be gluten-free, so I'm hoping that the outset likelihood and agreement with a test strip is fairly good evidence.

That said, I should stress that the above list of course only shows MY results for those specific batches of foods that I tested with one kind of kit. Caveat emptor.

Do you find the gluten-free watchdog to be a worthwhile service?


33 y/o male

Celiac and proud since 2007 - endoscopy/biopsy

Confirmed HLA genes 2014

Strict gluten-free diet since diagnosis

Post-eating nausea despite diet began Aug 2014

 

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Thanks for the info squirmingitch, that's fascinating. I certainly agree prima facie that home-kit tests can't be 100% relied upon, and the arguments by that RD are compelling. Just about everything I test is SUPPOSED to be gluten-free, so I'm hoping that the outset likelihood and agreement with a test strip is fairly good evidence.

That said, I should stress that the above list of course only shows MY results for those specific batches of foods that I tested with one kind of kit. Caveat emptor.

Do you find the gluten-free watchdog to be a worthwhile service?

I really do not regret paying that monthly fee for the gluten free watchdog. I have learned a lot from her. I find her to be fair and she is not biased one way or the other. She explains everything well & goes in depth as far as explaining what test they did with this or that & why it had to be done that way. When chocolate is an ingredient in anything they have to do something else to it in order to get a valid test. I would copy & paste some of that info. but we are not allowed to do that under the rules of the site. 


Gluten free Dec. 2011
Dermatitis Herpetiformis

Reynaud's October 2018

Rheumatoid Arthritis October 2018

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