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elonwy

Wheat Fiber That Is Gluten Free?

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So if anyone has been following the gluten free gravy thread, I bought two packets of Pacific Natural Foods mushroom gravy which is listed on thier web site as gluten free, though not on the package, only to find that the second or third ingredient is wheat fibre.

Naturally I flipped out, and both broncobux and I emailed them. This is the response:

The Mushroom Gravy is gluten free because the wheat fiber is minus the

protein.

Regards,

Peggy Carpenter

Sr.Customer Service Representative

Is this possible? I'm not sure that I could bring myself to eat it even if it is, just because it has the word wheat in it, I'd probably get sick just from being worried about it, I've built up a heavy pychological anti-gluten barrier in my little brain, but I am totally fascinated by this statement.

And if it is gluten free - why doesn't it say so on the package like all thier other gluten free stuff?

Elonwy

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So if anyone has been following the gluten free gravy thread, I bought two packets of Pacific Natural Foods mushroom gravy which is listed on thier web site as gluten free, though not on the package, only to find that the second or third ingredient is wheat fibre.

Naturally I flipped out, and both broncobux and I emailed them. This is the response:

The Mushroom Gravy is gluten free because the wheat fiber is minus the

protein.

Regards,

Peggy Carpenter

Sr.Customer Service Representative

Is this possible? I'm not sure that I could bring myself to eat it even if it is, just because it has the word wheat in it, I'd probably get sick just from being worried about it, I've built up a heavy pychological anti-gluten barrier in my little brain, but I am totally fascinated by this statement.

And if it is gluten free - why doesn't it say so on the package like all thier other gluten free stuff?

Elonwy

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hmm.... That's a good one. I'm stumped. I mean, can they 100% guarantee that it won't gluten you? I'm with you - I'd be so very leery of anything with the "W" word in it....But when they process it, how is it done? Do they take every little bitty grain and separate it with tweezers to make sure the bad stuff doesn't cross-contaminate the rest of the grain? I don't get it.

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got me... my rule however, is to never use wheat anything...including wheat grass...

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I have always made my own gravies, and even before I knew gluten was making me ill, they've been gluten-free.

I use cornstarch for a thickener. No big secret there I suppose. I'd never trust such a product from a lab someplace to even be edible enough to call it a food.

Being scientifically minded, I don't trust their statement. I'd be asking why they'd be adding fiber to gravy and not gluten. Gravy is basically just thickened fat anyway.

There isn't any reason I can think of for buying gravy when homemade is so easy, and so much more healthy and safe.

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It's the same as the codex wheat starch, where they've gone through some process to remove the proteins. I don't know the exact process, and unless they regularly do very low-tolerance testing, I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. Even though, I don't know if I'd buy it.

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I'm trying to get around making my own gravy for several reasons

A) I don't have access to the turkey

B) I work a fulltime and a parttime job and will already be cooking a pie and making stuffing then driving for 3 hours to go to where we're having dinner, so I was trying to find one thing that wasn't an enourmous PITA. Especially since its something ive never done before.

Sofar, very little luck. Other problem I already got it, cause it was a dash and grab, and their website said gluten-free. So I have two boxes of gravy that I don't want. Hate that.

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I'm trying to get around making my own gravy for several reasons

A) I don't have access to the turkey

B) I work a fulltime and a parttime job and will already be cooking a pie and making stuffing then driving for 3 hours to go to where we're having dinner, so I was trying to find one thing that wasn't an enourmous PITA. Especially since its something ive never done before.

Sofar, very little luck. Other problem I already got it, cause it was a dash and grab, and their website said gluten-free. So I have two boxes of gravy that I don't want. Hate that.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

If you can at least get broth, then just doctor that up with rice flour (or cornstarch) and you're good to go. I swear that Imagine's Chicken Broth works great for a nice, rich gravy. Heck, if you're in a big hurry, cut in a rice flour or corstarch slurry now, and just heat it when you get there. All you have to do is bring it to a simmer, stirring, for a minute. (I prefer to add the slurry as it's simmering, so I can get the thickness I want at the time, but it really is nearly as trivial as boiling water.)

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Fiiiiine. I'll stop complaining and try the broth thing. :) I was just so excited that they had it and then to be let down like that kinda got me all bent.

Thank you Tiffany :)

Elonwy

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Hmmm Butter. I'm ok with Dairy, I think I'll experiment during the free half hour I have this weekend. :P No seriously, I will try the broth thing, I'll let you knnow what happens.

Elonwy

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Fiiiiine. I'll stop complaining and try the broth thing. :) I was just so excited that they had it and then to be let down like that kinda got me all bent.

Thank you Tiffany :)

Elonwy

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

lol :-) (I figure no one thinks it'll turn out alright - just make sure it's a broth you like)

I feel your pain. That is, the gravy you found, probably the most "ooooo.... stupid people!" annoyance I've heard of! I don't blame you for being bent! At least you can return it to the store for your money back?

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If you actually have never made gravy, the "slurry" tarnalberry refers to is the cornstarch in COLD water. That keeps it from turning into a bunch of lumps when it hits the hot broth (or whatever you start with). Don't move the cup around in an attempt to distribute it while you pour. That will make lumps. I generally pour it in slowly, stiring in a tight circle right where it goes in. This seems to allow it to disperse more slowly. I never get lumps anyway, but it appears to help make the process go a little smoother, especially if you have the heat up enough to make it thicken right then. I typically keep the heat down below the point where it would be simmering, so it's hot, but not too hot such that the cornstarch thickens to quickly to disperse properly. Then I might turn it up a bit if the thickening hasn't quite begun.

I ain't never measured the amount of cornstarch and water - maybe 50/50 or something like that. I guess the consistency would be similar to whipping cream. Thinner is ok, but you'll be diluting the results more. In those cases when I don't have enough broth to stretch into the amount of gravy needed, a few spices, garlic and onion are perfectly welcome in my gravies. The color of the gravy you end up with is another matter. If that's gonna bother you then see about using something dark in color, like maybe soy sauce or something. I don't know since I never really cared what the color was. There is something called "gravy master", but I've no idea if it's gluten-free. I know I wouldn't use it since it has sugar in it - caramel something-or-other as I recall.

Seems to me that gravy might keep ok for a few days, right? Suppose you freeze it? I'm not sure if the cornstarch holds up to freezing, but there's also arrowrroot, and other stuff too.

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UMMMMM

So if I was ot amke grave all I would need is cornstarcht, water and broth? I never tried, but as this is my first celiac disease Thanksgiving, its time to learn I guess!

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UMMMMM

So if I was ot amke grave all I would need is cornstarcht, water and broth? I never tried, but as this is my first celiac disease Thanksgiving, its time to learn I guess!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That's about it. I usually start out with some actual meat juices. When making meat gravy, I'd usually be making something with ground turkey, so I'd just toss that around in a pan with some water or olive oil first, which would give me the meat juices to start off with. You can add spices, onion and garlic while the meat cooks, which will boost the whole flavor aspect of the gravy.

So, elonwy, if you don't have access to the turkey, you could use some ground turkey instead. You can always put the cooked meat in the fridge for adding to tomato sauce or top a gluten-free pizza.

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If you actually have never made gravy, the "slurry" tarnalberry refers to is the cornstarch in COLD water. That keeps it from turning into a bunch of lumps when it hits the hot broth (or whatever you start with). Don't move the cup around in an attempt to distribute it while you pour. That will make lumps. I generally pour it in slowly, stiring in a tight circle right where it goes in. This seems to allow it to disperse more slowly. I never get lumps anyway, but it appears to help make the process go a little smoother, especially if you have the heat up enough to make it thicken right then. I typically keep the heat down below the point where it would be simmering, so it's hot, but not too hot such that the cornstarch thickens to quickly to disperse properly. Then I might turn it up a bit if the thickening hasn't quite begun.

I ain't never measured the amount of cornstarch and water - maybe 50/50 or something like that. I guess the consistency would be similar to whipping cream. Thinner is ok, but you'll be diluting the results more. In those cases when I don't have enough broth to stretch into the amount of gravy needed, a few spices, garlic and onion are perfectly welcome in my gravies. The color of the gravy you end up with is another matter. If that's gonna bother you then see about using something dark in color, like maybe soy sauce or something. I don't know since I never really cared what the color was. There is something called "gravy master", but I've no idea if it's gluten-free. I know I wouldn't use it since it has sugar in it - caramel something-or-other as I recall.

Seems to me that gravy might keep ok for a few days, right? Suppose you freeze it? I'm not sure if the cornstarch holds up to freezing, but there's also arrowrroot, and other stuff too.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Good catch - the slurry is cold water and cornstarch - basically, it gives you a place to disperse the cornstarch (or sweet rice flour or whatever else you use) before the starch molecules start absorbing water and thickening. I usually have a drinking glass half full of water, and stir in about four or five tablespoons of cornstartch until that's smooth. Then I bring the broth or juices to a simmer in a separate pot, and, while it simmers, add the slury one tablespoon at a time. (I refer to dinnertable tablespoons, or soup spoons, not measuring spoons, in this last one.) Then I stir the gravy as it simmers, for a minute or so, to see the results, and keep adding more slury, stirring while it simmers for a minute each time (give it a full minute for the starch molecules to absorb water), until I get the consistency I want. So really, it takes as long it is takes to simmer the liquid, and then another five or six minutes.

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UMMMMM

So if I was ot amke grave all I would need is cornstarcht, water and broth? I never tried, but as this is my first celiac disease Thanksgiving, its time to learn I guess!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yep, you could even make the slurry with cold broth, if you don't want to dilute it at all.

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Then I bring the broth or juices to a simmer in a separate pot, and, while it simmers, add the slury one tablespoon at a time.  (I refer to dinnertable tablespoons, or soup spoons, not measuring spoons, in this last one.)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Oh, thanks for the reminder. I have always used a fork, that way you don't get a blob of starch stuck on it.

One tablespoon at a time? You may want to try it the way I described next time. I'm not suggesting your method is wrong though. Clearly you are plenty capable in the kitchen. Honestly, I'm the only one I know who never has a problem making smooth gravy (though apparently you are getting good results). Whenever my mother would need gravy for the dinner, she'd always ask me to make it! She can't seem to get it right. However, she never actually followed my directions either. When she'd ask me if I could "fix the gravy", I'd go into the kitchen, only to find she had used a spoon. She also had the temp too high.

Yep, you could even make the slurry with cold broth, if you don't want to dilute it at all.

Good point. I guess that's sorta what my method is doing, since I keep the temp down at first. Then boosting the heat until it thickens up.

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If you want the mushroom flavor, you could dice the mushrooms, saute them in a little butter, then when they are soft, add the cornstarch and then the broth, stirring the whole time so there are no lumps, but cornstarch doesn't usually lump if it is mixed before adding all the other stuff. Good luck......

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Oh, thanks for the reminder. I have always used a fork, that way you don't get a blob of starch stuck on it.

One tablespoon at a time? You may want to try it the way I described next time. I'm not suggesting your method is wrong though. Clearly you are plenty capable in the kitchen. Honestly, I'm the only one I know who never has a problem making smooth gravy (though apparently you are getting good results). Whenever my mother would need gravy for the dinner, she'd always ask me to make it! She can't seem to get it right. However, she never actually followed my directions either. When she'd ask me if I could "fix the gravy", I'd go into the kitchen, only to find she had used a spoon. She also had the temp too high.

Good point. I guess that's sorta what my method is doing, since I keep the temp down at first. Then boosting the heat until it thickens up.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I've never had a problem with lumpy gravy, it's just that I may not know how much juice I got out of the turkey, or how thick I'm really wanting the gravy to be that night, so I add the cornstarch slowly, rather than use a pre-determined ratio. That's the reason for adding slowly - to see how thick it's getting and stop before you add too much cornstarch. Sometimes, if the turkey's dripped a lot of collagen out of the joints/bones, you'll need less cornstarch as well. (I never understood how you could get lumps in gravy either. ;-) ) I've never had it lump up on me as long as the slurry is well mixed, and the broth/juices are actively simmering. Of course, I may make my slurry a bit thinner than yours, which probably makes a difference given the starch concentration.

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I've never had a problem with lumpy gravy, it's just that I may not know how much juice I got out of the turkey, or how thick I'm really wanting the gravy to be that night, so I add the cornstarch slowly, rather than use a pre-determined ratio.  That's the reason for adding slowly - to see how thick it's getting and stop before you add too much cornstarch.  Sometimes, if the turkey's dripped a lot of collagen out of the joints/bones, you'll need less cornstarch as well.  (I never understood how you could get lumps in gravy either. ;-) )  I've never had it lump up on me as long as the slurry is well mixed, and the broth/juices are actively simmering.  Of course, I may make my slurry a bit thinner than yours, which probably makes a difference given the starch concentration.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Oh, I see. That's logical. I guess I always just guestimate the amount, and if it's too much, I would just add water. Then again, I like thick gravies, so it seldom gets too thick for me. I do reach for more cornstarch many times though :) But who ever ended up with too much gravy? All my thanksgiving experiences include running out of gravy. There was also a chronic lack of veggies at the table, but that's another story.

Mostly though, I'd be making a sort of cheese sauce. I use a few slices of cheese, and the cornstarch to make into a thick sauce. It makes the cheese stretch further, which is good considering the prices of the stuff. Add margarine, a few spices and onion, and spread that over rice or mashed potatoes with veggies. Yum!

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Oh, I see. That's logical. I guess I always just guestimate the amount, and if it's too much, I would just add water. Then again, I like thick gravies, so it seldom gets too thick for me. I do reach for more cornstarch many times though :) But who ever ended up with too much gravy? All my thanksgiving experiences include running out of gravy. There was also a chronic lack of veggies at the table, but that's another story.

Mostly though, I'd be making a sort of cheese sauce. I use a few slices of cheese, and the cornstarch to make into a thick sauce. It makes the cheese stretch further, which is good considering the prices of the stuff. Add margarine, a few spices and onion, and spread that over rice or mashed potatoes with veggies. Yum!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

There's always a huge lack of gravy in my house, too, and I go nuts adding broth, etc to extend it. We usually have about 12 people and they ALL love gravy. Anyway, I haven't used the slurry method recently but think I'll try it this week. Last year I made the gravy but forgot the rice flour so my husband ran to get it and accidentally grabbed the tapioca starch, and I was so nervous I didn't notice until the gravy was done. It was fine but took more "flour" than I was used to using. I think this year I'm going to try the sweet rice flour, not cornstarch, because I try to avoid corn most of the time. And sweet rice flour is great in cheese sauces, too.

Stephanie

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...And sweet rice flour is great in cheese sauces, too.

Stephanie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Oh! Thanks for the tip! I've never tried that before. It's always been cornstarch for me. Can you describe the differences? What aspects make it good compared to cornstarch? Texture, taste, consistency, etc? Does it actually make it taste sweet or something? I've been hesitant to try any of the flours with the word "sweet" in the name.

I'm not a fan of sweets. When I want a snack or a treat, it's usually something salty that hits the spot. Though fruit is fine, it just doesn't seem to really satisfy the munchies. Of course, the crunchier the better! Corn nuts, tortilla chips, potato chips. Most brands are putting too much salt though, but I've found some good ones, including certified organic tortilla chips. That gets me back to cheese sauce, as in nachos. I just looked it up, and here's a recipe for refried beans: http://www.gfutah.org/recipes/Refried_Beans.html

That site is all gluten-free - YAY!

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