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egs1707

Overwhelmed and unable to accept

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15 hours ago, egs1707 said:

Yeah I think there's a company over here that does Cyrex tests on demand so does sound like an option. Again quite a bit of Internet self-diagnosis going on to be asking for the tests but thyroid does seem an overlooked possible side-effect so may be worth it for peace of mind.

Well I considered it but I finally came to terms with not having definitive answers and decided to get on with getting on. I said my piece above about the cost / benefit to continued research and getting some help in coming to terms with the psychological impact. I think that's an area that would give you a much greater boost but that's your call.  All the best whichever way you choose to move forward, hope that better times are just around the corner for you :)

 

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So it's been a while since the last post, nearly 2 months in fact (time flies!)

The vitamin D pills I mentioned on the previous page have been a revelation :) Started noticing them kicking in about 2-3 weeks after taking the first one, regained muscle strength and that inflammation feeling has reduced too. Internet research beats the GP once again (who refused me the vitamin panel tests until overruled when I made a complaint). Also had TSH done around the same time, came back normal so they say the labs won't run the other tests if that's within range.

Had a sinus infection around that time which took the best part of 2-3 months to go, again noticed a positive change once that cleared up in terms of head pressure etc.

Seen a second dietitian who gave a few tips about food combinations for nutrient absorption but otherwise was happy with current progress and to check back in 6 months. Similar feedback from the gastro specialist - will have a repeat tTG soon to see how the levels are looking as he expects them to have dropped a bit by now.

If I had to put a number on it I'd say I'm back to about 70% of where I was before all this started. On some days a bit more like 75% but it varies. There may well be some additional food intolerances but I can't be doing with those right now so I'll carry on as I am unless something really obvious begins to stand out.

I've had a few projects on recently that have helped occupy the mind away from the celiac scare stories which has been helpful. Did have a bit of a relapse the other day when that (slightly dubious research) link to diabetes came about as I've always feared that particular illness.

All in all celiac still sucks, I still hate it but making some progress in trying to get my life back...

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28 minutes ago, egs1707 said:

So it's been a while since the last post, nearly 2 months in fact (time flies!)

The vitamin D pills I mentioned on the previous page have been a revelation :) Started noticing them kicking in about 2-3 weeks after taking the first one, regained muscle strength and that inflammation feeling has reduced too. Internet research beats the GP once again (who refused me the vitamin panel tests until overruled when I made a complaint). Also had TSH done around the same time, came back normal so they say the labs won't run the other tests if that's within range.

Had a sinus infection around that time which took the best part of 2-3 months to go, again noticed a positive change once that cleared up in terms of head pressure etc.

Seen a second dietitian who gave a few tips about food combinations for nutrient absorption but otherwise was happy with current progress and to check back in 6 months. Similar feedback from the gastro specialist - will have a repeat tTG soon to see how the levels are looking as he expects them to have dropped a bit by now.

If I had to put a number on it I'd say I'm back to about 70% of where I was before all this started. On some days a bit more like 75% but it varies. There may well be some additional food intolerances but I can't be doing with those right now so I'll carry on as I am unless something really obvious begins to stand out.

I've had a few projects on recently that have helped occupy the mind away from the celiac scare stories which has been helpful. Did have a bit of a relapse the other day when that (slightly dubious research) link to diabetes came about as I've always feared that particular illness.

All in all celiac still sucks, I still hate it but making some progress in trying to get my life back...

Always had a slight fear of diabetes myself due to my nerve issues was first thought by doctors to be diabetes. I will tell you something that I did for another reason that slammed that thought. I got a glucose monitor kit for like $14 for everything. And started checking my blood sugar for a few days making record of meals snacks, moods etc. IT did show that on the lower end of healthy and higher end is when my mood changed. BUT they were all well within your normal range of 90-135. Few times after waking up in the morning was a tad lower and after working out, but that depletes your glucose stores, and this ran with my binge eating urges....oddly for nuts and protein, and stevia tea.     But the fact is it showed my blood sugars changes very little in relations to my food, but more to do with my physical activity and stress, along with normal ranges so proved I was not diabetic at all in my mind.

Congratulations on finding your regime and issues out so far, hope you nail down your other culprit. Might just take more healing and time an be nothing.

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2 hours ago, egs1707 said:

All in all celiac still sucks, I still hate it but making some progress in trying to get my life back...

Good to hear this. Keep looking after yourself, eating well and get that last 30% or more back next!

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Also already using my experience of having done the gluten-free diagnosis route the hard way to help some others I've been speaking to elsewhere. May already have saved a few people by recommending them to vitamin tests, how to get through gluten challenge and so on.

Giving something back after getting the help here, that's what it's all about right :)

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Random question for you all, did your appetite change over time after going gluten-free?

At the moment I feel like I can eat and eat and eat. Not putting on any weight as such but holding steady at least.

May also be because my activity level has gone up a *lot* recently (beginning to catch up on me now actually, feeling a bit tired at the moment) but has anyone experienced something similar?

Btw @Ennis_TX did I just see on another thread you make your own garlic bread? Be very interested to hear how you do that :)

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18 minutes ago, egs1707 said:

Random question for you all, did your appetite change over time after going gluten-free?

At the moment I feel like I can eat and eat and eat. Not putting on any weight as such but holding steady at least.

May also be because my activity level has gone up a *lot* recently (beginning to catch up on me now actually, feeling a bit tired at the moment) but has anyone experienced something similar?

Btw @Ennis_TX did I just see on another thread you make your own garlic bread? Be very interested to hear how you do that :)

Amusingly it is a grain free recipe based on a combination of ideas from my cauliflower pizza crust where I used melted cheese in the dough, and my cinnamon cake idea of using a combination of coconut and almond flour for a base, I found I could apple sauce as a binder to keep it moist and avoid making it too crunchy and then learned if you use butter flavored coconut oil for nutiva and a herb coating you can make a damn good bread. BEST PART is that it reheats better then gluten based breads and is even softer and moister the next day if stored in the fridge in a foil pouch over night then microwaved in a paper towel for 10-15 sec.  I make little rolls out of it about 2-3 inches long for mini cheesy garlic sticks. Even further modified it finding using cheddar, chives, and a repeated flatten fold with the dough makes for layered fluffy cheddar biscuits......

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117322-vegan-cheesy-garlic-knots/

 

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29 minutes ago, egs1707 said:

Random question for you all, did your appetite change over time after going gluten-free?

At the moment I feel like I can eat and eat and eat. Not putting on any weight as such but holding steady at least.

May also be because my activity level has gone up a *lot* recently (beginning to catch up on me now actually, feeling a bit tired at the moment) but has anyone experienced something similar?

Btw @Ennis_TX did I just see on another thread you make your own garlic bread? Be very interested to hear how you do that :)

My daughter and son can pack away the food.  We all have the CONSTANT feeling of being hungry.  My daughter and I both gained about 15 pounds in 7 months, my son is slowly gaining weight.  It honestly freaked me out to actually gain weight.  We don't eat processed gluten free foods very often.  If we do it's certified and made in a gluten free facility.  Last night was the first time that the kids didn't want a snack after dinner.  Lemon butter chicken and a massive amount of baked sweet potatoes hit the spot!    

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On the topic of eating more after healing. I was always hungry, I recently changed over to a ketogenic diet of just fats and protein pretty much eliminating all grains, fruits, and starchy carbs. My urges to binge eat have gone away with a much higher fat intake. And I seem to have limitless energy....like my workouts to try to build up weight now, I never get tired and just have to set a timer. Amusing now having to stop myself, 3 years ago I was anemic most of the day and sleeping ALL the time, like taking massive amount of energy drinks to try to do anything and still dozing off.  It is amazing the difference once the healing is under way and you get better.

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Reality check in the past few weeks, looks like I got glutened at what should be a "safe" restaurant for gluten-free and gone right back to the beginning again recovery-wise :(

Now too scared to eat anywhere and turning down social opportunities because of the food issues, what a miserable way to live this is.

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On 5/27/2017 at 11:52 AM, egs1707 said:

Reality check in the past few weeks, looks like I got glutened at what should be a "safe" restaurant for gluten-free and gone right back to the beginning again recovery-wise :(

Now too scared to eat anywhere and turning down social opportunities because of the food issues, what a miserable way to live this is.

It sucks when you've taken precautions and they don't pan out. Take heart however, although it feels like you're back to square one but one exposure doesn't negate all the healing that you've gone through. Eat simply and safely for now and get back on track. You should feel better soon.

As for eating out, it's the same as when you learned to ride a bike. You dust yourself off, learn a lesson about that venue and get back on the bike. You need to balance risk and reward. Too far either way isn't the way to go.

Hope you're feeling better soon :)

 

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15 hours ago, Jmg said:

It sucks when you've taken precautions and they don't pan out. Take heart however, although it feels like you're back to square one but one exposure doesn't negate all the healing that you've gone through. Eat simply and safely for now and get back on track. You should feel better soon.

As for eating out, it's the same as when you learned to ride a bike. You dust yourself off, learn a lesson about that venue and get back on the bike. You need to balance risk and reward. Too far either way isn't the way to go.

Hope you're feeling better soon :)

 

You're right on the extremes, I'm sitting in a gluten-free food festival right now and still unsure if to eat anything which I guess means I've hit the extreme end of the scale.

Seem to be noticing the recovery pattern over the course of 6 weeks or so after a gluten hit. Will be very interesting to see what the blood test readings come out like when I eventually get them done again.

And thanks for the good wishes :)

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I've had the results of the 6-month levels check now (under a new doctor fortunately who is actually being proactive rather than denying me the tests I need)... gone down from off-the-charts to "weak positive". So, as expected after a short timescale not healed but tTg going in the right direction. Other tests for the common autoimmune conditions come back normal as well which is a relief.

However on the flip side socially this lifestyle is every bit as bad as I feared back on page 1. People are horrified by the condition when you're forced to explain what "even a little bit" of gluten does and they back away after that. Despite what I've read on other posts from my experiences people don't like having one member of the group not eating and do make comments about it. Eventually they just decide not to invite the person who can't \ won't eat.

Dating is also finished now too, the mix of not being able to eat out and having to reveal the condition elicits a response of thinly masked horror \ disgust from the date and at that point it's all over. Had it happen enough times now and there's no good way to dress up celiac and sadly people don't want to get involved with it when there's 99 other people out of the 100 who are fit and well. Having to accept that fate is as painful as the physical symptoms were 9-12 months ago.

So while physically there may be some improvement my world is so much smaller and life so much less enjoyable. In effect celiac is the perfect bully... there's the names and labels ("disease" particularly hurts), the constant fear of being caught out with no margin for error, the physical pain inflicted by a gluten reaction, social isolation and finally if I don't do what it says it will eventually kill me.

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17 hours ago, egs1707 said:

Dating is also finished now too, the mix of not being able to eat out and having to reveal the condition elicits a response of thinly masked horror \ disgust from the date and at that point it's all over. Had it happen enough times now and there's no good way to dress up celiac and sadly people don't want to get involved with it when there's 99 other people out of the 100 who are fit and well. Having to accept that fate is as painful as the physical symptoms were 9-12 months ago.

Maybe I can help with a female perspective. I’d never reject a guy just because he has celiac/NCGS. It’s not your fault. I don’t think it’s possible to prevent celiac/NCGS really. The thing that matters though is your attitude because you can control that. Please don’t take offense but I think you’re stuck in victim mentality. On an instinctive level, I am looking for a guy to protect me, and victim mentality is unattractive. My point is that the thing that makes a guy manly/unmanly  is his attitude.     

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14 hours ago, egs1707 said:

I've had the results of the 6-month levels check now (under a new doctor fortunately who is actually being proactive rather than denying me the tests I need)... gone down from off-the-charts to "weak positive". So, as expected after a short timescale not healed but tTg going in the right direction. Other tests for the common autoimmune conditions come back normal as well which is a relief.

However on the flip side socially this lifestyle is every bit as bad as I feared back on page 1. People are horrified by the condition when you're forced to explain what "even a little bit" of gluten does and they back away after that. Despite what I've read on other posts from my experiences people don't like having one member of the group not eating and do make comments about it. Eventually they just decide not to invite the person who can't \ won't eat.

Dating is also finished now too, the mix of not being able to eat out and having to reveal the condition elicits a response of thinly masked horror \ disgust from the date and at that point it's all over. Had it happen enough times now and there's no good way to dress up celiac and sadly people don't want to get involved with it when there's 99 other people out of the 100 who are fit and well. Having to accept that fate is as painful as the physical symptoms were 9-12 months ago.

So while physically there may be some improvement my world is so much smaller and life so much less enjoyable. In effect celiac is the perfect bully... there's the names and labels ("disease" particularly hurts), the constant fear of being caught out with no margin for error, the physical pain inflicted by a gluten reaction, social isolation and finally if I don't do what it says it will eventually kill me.

Yeah it gets a tad depressing, I normally just bring my own food, or do not eat out. I have started inviting people over and cooking gluten-free full meals and just host get together. Yesterday I did one with wraps, Had Eggs and chorizo seasonings, Mexican rice, re-fried beans, and had lettuce scoops, bean chips, and coconut wraps with salsa and taco sauce. Sort of make your own wrap or dip plate, quite enjoyable. 

PS hardly anyone turns down liquor.....get rum, taquilia, and non grain based vodka.....offer to be the mixer for the night and get a bunch of juices, soda etc. And serve chips, dips, and snack mixes as a side perhaps make a batch of wings....invite friends over to watch a game or something and provide safe foods and snacks. Look for gluten-free ciders like Austins also.

Dating...well at least your normal otherwise I have Asperger....like sheldon from big bang theory, combined with ADHD.....yeah I am awkward to be around even more so.  On a side note you could just mentioned you have to be gluten-free for life to to adverse effects of even a tiny bit of gluten for medical reasons....oddly enough with the food trends as of late you might find a health nut girl who is gluten free by choice ......or even luckier and find another celiac (yeah looking myself) there was a long term joke here about picking up dates at a GI office or asking the nurse at a GI office to help set us up with fellow celiacs lol.

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47 minutes ago, Ennis_TX said:



Dating...well at least your normal otherwise I have Asperger....like sheldon from big bang theory, combined with ADHD.....yeah I am awkward to be around even more so.  On a side note you could just mentioned you have to be gluten-free for life to to adverse effects of even a tiny bit of gluten for medical reasons....oddly enough with the food trends as of late you might find a health nut girl who is gluten free by choice ......or even luckier and find another celiac (yeah looking myself) there was a long term joke here about picking up dates at a GI office or asking the nurse at a GI office to help set us up with fellow celiacs lol.

Ennis gives some excellent advice. As to the dating issue I have seen dating sites for folks with Celiac and even for people with Aspergers. I don't know how active those sites would be but maybe those would be helpful in finding freinds with the same problems that we have.

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There are also celiac support groups in many places.  Sometimes they sponsor group meals for social interaction.  And often they have ideas of safe places to eat.  Check Facebook for you area.  Or local hospitals or search the web for support groups.  If you can't find a group then start one on Facebook yourself.  That's easy to do.

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17 hours ago, egs1707 said:

I've had the results of the 6-month levels check now (under a new doctor fortunately who is actually being proactive rather than denying me the tests I need)... gone down from off-the-charts to "weak positive". So, as expected after a short timescale not healed but tTg going in the right direction. Other tests for the common autoimmune conditions come back normal as well which is a relief.

I'm glad to hear you're doing well on the diet. :)

17 hours ago, egs1707 said:

So while physically there may be some improvement my world is so much smaller and life so much less enjoyable. In effect celiac is the perfect bully... there's the names and labels ("disease" particularly hurts), the constant fear of being caught out with no margin for error, the physical pain inflicted by a gluten reaction, social isolation and finally if I don't do what it says it will eventually kill me.

We've talked before about it but you could do worse than look into getting some cognitive behavioural therapy or other help to deal with this. Otherwise you can find yourself going round in circles, never really improving. There are people out there enjoying their lives with far worse restrictions than you experience and the difference is very much in mental approach. CBT could help you with that, but the benefits you get from any such program are directly related to the efforts you put in to it.

As ever, best of luck :)

 

 

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I just want to add one more thing.. to give you an example..

There is no logic in this:

On 25. 8. 2017 at 9:01 PM, egs1707 said:

Had it happen enough times now and there's no good way to dress up celiac and sadly people don't want to get involved with it when there's 99 other people out of the 100 who are fit and well.

The fact that 99 people out of 100 don’t have celiac doesn’t imply that 99 people out of 100 are fit and well. Almost everyone has some kind of a health issue.

Imagine 100 people.

Person no. 1 has diabetes. No. 2 has thyroiditis. No. 3 is infertile No. 4 is disabled. No. 5 has cancer. ... ... ... No. 100 (you) has celiac.

Do you still feel like the unlucky one?

Again, I don’t mean to offend you. I’m just convinced that a shift in your attitude would help you a lot.

Good luck.

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Quick question before getting onto the quotes - with antibodies reducing significantly but still enough of a positive result to be a diagnosis where does that leave the villi healing process? Would they be repairing as the levels are coming down or is the presence of antibodies mean the villi are still likely to be "flat" as there's still something there damaging them?

On 26/08/2017 at 11:26 AM, ravenwoodglass said:

Ennis gives some excellent advice. As to the dating issue I have seen dating sites for folks with Celiac and even for people with Aspergers. I don't know how active those sites would be but maybe those would be helpful in finding freinds with the same problems that we have.

Been there tried that, results were... interesting... 10 people in the entire country, only 5 active profiles and nearest one was over 100 miles away and didn't actually eat gluten-free. Needless to say the site didn't get any money from me.  Never mind plenty of fish in the sea, it's more like a puddle now :lol:

On 26/08/2017 at 10:19 AM, Gluten_free_01 said:

Maybe I can help with a female perspective. I’d never reject a guy just because he has celiac/NCGS

Think you have a better attitude than most I've come across in this year or so since getting diagnosed. It tends to go that people (in general not just dating) don't mind gluten-free eating, in fact a fair few people have said "oh yeah I've tried that, loads of options in restaurants now", which all promising until they go "but you're not a celiac are you?!" then the attitude shifts significantly :(  

 

On 26/08/2017 at 10:19 AM, Gluten_free_01 said:

On an instinctive level, I am looking for a guy to protect me

Think that's hit the nail on the head of why I feel down on the situation. Celiac means I'm pretty much the opposite now having to run away from restaurants, meals etc. fearing insignificant (in the eyes of others) things like cross contamination which hardly comes across as traits of a strong protector. Physically it's took a toll too, feels like I've aged 10 years in 1 year at times.

 

On 27/08/2017 at 10:32 AM, Gluten_free_01 said:

I just want to add one more thing.. to give you an example..

There is no logic in this:

The fact that 99 people out of 100 don’t have celiac doesn’t imply that 99 people out of 100 are fit and well. Almost everyone has some kind of a health issue.

Imagine 100 people.

Person no. 1 has diabetes. No. 2 has thyroiditis. No. 3 is infertile No. 4 is disabled. No. 5 has cancer. ... ... ... No. 100 (you) has celiac.

Do you still feel like the unlucky one?

Again, I don’t mean to offend you. I’m just convinced that a shift in your attitude would help you a lot.

Good luck.

Yeah I phrased that badly, meant only 1 in that 100 has the OTT celiac restrictions. Funny enough when I was getting diabetic-esque symptoms the other week I had a read around their forums and there was a bit about celiac on there. People were saying they'd prefer diabetes to celiac as at least there's a bit of leeway with sugar management. Tbh both scare the hell out of me long-term but was an interesting perspective.

On 26/08/2017 at 1:45 PM, GFinDC said:

There are also celiac support groups in many places.  Sometimes they sponsor group meals for social interaction.  And often they have ideas of safe places to eat.  Check Facebook for you area.  Or local hospitals or search the web for support groups.  If you can't find a group then start one on Facebook yourself.  That's easy to do.

Yup good call, found those a while back which have been useful.

 

On 26/08/2017 at 10:30 AM, Ennis_TX said:

Yeah it gets a tad depressing, I normally just bring my own food, or do not eat out. I have started inviting people over and cooking gluten-free full meals and just host get together. Yesterday I did one with wraps, Had Eggs and chorizo seasonings, Mexican rice, re-fried beans, and had lettuce scoops, bean chips, and coconut wraps with salsa and taco sauce. Sort of make your own wrap or dip plate, quite enjoyable. 

Sounds good in theory but given the attitudes I've had off people so far they wouldn't go anywhere near a celiac-hosted gluten-free food evening lol.  Tends more to be I  have to go to where the event \ people are as they won't go out their way otherwise. In a way I kind of do get it, if the boot was on the other foot chances are I wouldn't be any better at being supportive.

On 26/08/2017 at 1:49 PM, Jmg said:

Otherwise you can find yourself going round in circles, never really improving.

It feels that way, regardless of what I do it's the attitude of others that makes or breaks things socially, which has what has really been noticeable since the diagnosis. Can't see celiac ever really being accepted unless some miracle happens on the research side and cross-contamination worries can be removed from the equation. 

 

On 26/08/2017 at 1:49 PM, Jmg said:

As ever, best of luck :)

Thanks, I'm gonna need it B)

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Hey man that last post about being protective and running away...I know that feeling. No clue where you live and your laws, but I took to getting a carry license and becoming very proficient at the use of a gun. I might only be 130lbs and not have stamina or strength but I am very proud and content knowing how good I have gotten with it and have confidence I can defend myself and my loved ones if s$#& hits the fan. 
You said people run away from a gluten-free hosted event....fine do game night offer booze. Social people do not turn that down often. Break out candied seasoned nuts, Chips, salsa, bean dip. Veggie trays. and serve up mixers with rum and taquilla huge blender style. Have some hard ciders like Austins around but the mixer idea is cheaper. People love a good bartender who can mix up drinks good and it is super simple to read up and even scale up recipes. Margarita night with chips, dips, and wings......yeah people love it they go to bars and normally pay $5 for a small one. Rum mixers are also fun. You can do BBQ also and grill up ribs, wings, chicken and serve up with gluten-free chips. I mean maybe it is a texas thing but no one turns down free ribs...and side like coleslaw, potato salad and baked beans are easy to get and do gluten-free.   I have done  BBQ nacho night also, cooked a shoulder roast in a crock pot in 2 cans of cane sugar gluten-free rootbeer with 2 cloves of garlic and half a onion 8 hours later drain it chop up the onion, toss the garlic shred the shoulder, you can either pour in BBQ sauce and make shredded BBQ or serve as is...... come winter you can serve up hot drinks also I have a KILLER Russian tea recipe on the forums....mix in rum and serve it out of one of those 30cup peculators to family and friends on a cold night.

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2 hours ago, egs1707 said:

Think you have a better attitude than most I've come across in this year or so since getting diagnosed. It tends to go that people (in general not just dating) don't mind gluten-free eating, in fact a fair few people have said "oh yeah I've tried that, loads of options in restaurants now", which all promising until they go "but you're not a celiac are you?!" then the attitude shifts significantly :( 

Egs, I haven’t read the entire discussion, just skimmed through it, but you’re a vegetarian, right? Being both a celiac and a vegetarian is like the ‘opposite of mainstream’ diet-wise, so maybe that’s the reason many people are still unable to accept it / distance themselves. I’m wondering if other vegetarians / vegans would be more likely to understand celiac..

2 hours ago, egs1707 said:

Think that's hit the nail on the head of why I feel down on the situation. Celiac means I'm pretty much the opposite now having to run away from restaurants, meals etc. fearing insignificant (in the eyes of others) things like cross contamination which hardly comes across as traits of a strong protector. Physically it's took a toll too, feels like I've aged 10 years in 1 year at times.

Ok, I see. But at least you’re strong enough to take celiac seriously and not live in denial. You said your antibodies went down significantly and that’s also a great sign and a proof that you’re responsible and self-disciplined. Look at it this way :)

And btw gluten is not a bully (your words). Maybe think of it as a type of poison you’re not gonna eat, not a bully.

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On 3. 9. 2017 at 0:35 PM, egs1707 said:

Quick question before getting onto the quotes - with antibodies reducing significantly but still enough of a positive result to be a diagnosis where does that leave the villi healing process? Would they be repairing as the levels are coming down or is the presence of antibodies mean the villi are still likely to be "flat" as there's still something there damaging them?

This is an interesting question. I’d like to know the answer, too.

In my opinion, the villi are healing and repairing. However, it’s not possible to say how much they have healed and repaired based on blood test results alone. For example, if tTG is ‘X’ now, it’s impossible to say that the villi damage is equal to Marsh grade ‘Y’ now. The only way to know for sure would be a repeat biopsy, I think.

I'd say that even if the blood test result is negative, it doesn’t automatically mean that the villi have healed completely and there is zero damage.

PS: I’m not an expert. I’m sure there are other forum members who have better knowledge.

-------

'It is important to keep in mind that tTG antibody levels fluctuate and depend on the degree of intestinal damage. Thus, a negative test is possible in a patient with minimal pathology (ie, Marsh I lesion) and does not necessarily rule out milder forms of celiac disease. Repeat testing may provide significant clinical insight and help decide the appropriate timing for a biopsy or monitoring dietary compliance.'

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088693/

'In children, histologic improvement on a GFD appears to occur quickly, while in adults the small intestinal mucosa heals more slowly and less completely. Monitoring adherence by clinic visits and serologic testing appears to be a reasonable approach in children. In adults, this approach is also reasonable with the understanding that a negative serologic test result does not necessarily mean improvement beyond severe subtotal or total villous atrophy.'

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2842922/

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