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I just noticed my favorite coffee mugs which are probably glazed porcelain or possibly glazed ceramic are showing wear along the rim surface (where you place your lips).  Can they be washed well or is this a source of cross contamination?  I haven't noticed this topic anywhere.  I read not to use steel wool on porcelain or glass in other threads.  Is this because the steel wool with scratch glass and make it then not useable? (I already used steel wool on glass pyrex because it did have scratches already).  Folks talk about throwing out wood, plastic, and teflon that is scratched but what about glass or porcelain (like my coffee mugs)?  I also read that if you used flavored coffee in your Keurig machine pre diagnosis, it could be cross contaminated.  Since it is plastic essentially, does that mean throw out?  How would I clean it?  Still trying to get all gluten out of kitchen and new at this.  Thanks

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What would you have used the cups for that had gluten?  Also, I have never seen a Keurig cup with gluten.  I suppose you could send some vinegar through and then several plain water cycles.  There is also somehting called a "de-scaler" that is supposed to go thru coffee systems and get the calcium build-up from water and coffee oil build-up off.

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I would eat gluten throughout the day while drinking my coffee pre diagnosis.  So exchange from my mouth to the rim of the cup.  Some of my cups have areas  no longer glazed or with scratches on them on that rim.  Wondering if  those are small areas that gluten could hide and be difficult to clean because porous (due to scratches or deglazed areas).  Still working on that initial clean out of old gluten contamination in kitchen items.  

 

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44 minutes ago, rumberg said:

I would eat gluten throughout the day while drinking my coffee pre diagnosis.  So exchange from my mouth to the rim of the cup.  Some of my cups have areas  no longer glazed or with scratches on them on that rim.  Wondering if  those are small areas that gluten could hide and be difficult to clean because porous (due to scratches or deglazed areas).  Still working on that initial clean out of old gluten contamination in kitchen items.  

 

I don't think I would worry there was gluten hiding there.  But I think you need new cups - you probably shouldn't use cups that no longer have a good base of glaze. 

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Thanks for responding.  I decided you are absolutely right that I just need to get rid of them anyway.  I was going to throw away most of my quality pots and pans because all of them over the years have scratches or even some pitting in them?  I am trying to understand the concept related to scratches on kitchen items.  Do I consider if the item is nonporous (like aluminum/stainless pans or pyrex glass) and assume I can clean those even if they have scratches with good scrubs?  And only worry about scratches on porous items like cutting boards, tuber ware or plastics?  Also throw out juicer which has plastic and mesh strainer mounted on the motor in which possibly glutenous substances were used in it before or graters?  (I understand sifters and colander).  I have a large kitchen drawer filled with clips, pens, pencils, rubber bands, scotch tape etc etc.  When they say deglutenize your kitchen, does that mean throwing out things that could have been contaminated by my dirty gluten free hands in prior life?  I already have eczema on hands and don't want to have to wash hands after I touch anything pre diagnosis.  But am mostly focusing on kitchen and bathrooms.  Or am I being crazy?  I am asymptomatic so I will not know when I have exposed myself.  Sorry, I hope to pay it forward to newbies one day but right now I am going crazy trying to be compliant and it is the above type of questions that are driving me NUTS!  Thanks

 

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I think we sometimes go a bit overboard on this throwing out kitchen stuff.  The basic idea is that anything that is hard to clean - like all the little holes in a colander or a porous pizza stone- should  be replaced.  If you think you can get something clean- use it.  The fact is, it's not going to be an endless supply of gluten in the little scratches on your pans.  If it's going to come out - it will the first time you use it.  I put old pans in the dish washer and have been using them.  

I cleaned out the kitchen drawers because they get crumbs.  We should all probably clean them out more.  Just wash off the pens if you want.  Throw it all out and start a new junk drawer if that helps.  :lol:

Edited by kareng

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"If  is gonna come out, it will the first time you use it"  will absoulutely give me comfort.  The nurse in me is too focused on cross contamination.  I am thinking if I put a pan or pen in a shelf or drawer that has gluten in or on it then I will need to reclean the entire shelf or drawer and all items in it and worse never know the source.  It is really helpful to hear from folk that have immediate reactions because they know cross contamination realistically.  Thanks

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22 minutes ago, rumberg said:

"If  is gonna come out, it will the first time you use it"  will absoulutely give me comfort.  The nurse in me is too focused on cross contamination.  I am thinking if I put a pan or pen in a shelf or drawer that has gluten in or on it then I will need to reclean the entire shelf or drawer and all items in it and worse never know the source.  It is really helpful to hear from folk that have immediate reactions because they know cross contamination realistically.  Thanks

I worked in health care, too.  But the fact is, gluten isn't like a germ.  It won't multiply and dried crumbs don't really stick...  Just use some common sense and you will be fine

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Hi rumberg,

I often rinse things before I use them, just to be sure.  It only takes a few seconds to rinse something off.  But I live with gluten eaters so I know there is flour floating around sometimes.  If I lived by myself I'd never intentionally bring gluten items into the house so I wouldn't worry about rinsing things.  Unless I was buying something gluteney as a gift of course.

I think the far more likely source of gluten would be food products you might eat that have some gluten in them.  Many foods are now labeled gluten-free.  Meats, veggies, eggs, and fruits are naturally gluten-free.  Nuts you have to be careful of because they sometimes add flavoring to them and it could contain gluten.  So always read labels.  The best labels have only one ingredient listed, but up to 3 ingredients is usually a good item.  After you've been gluten-free for a few months things will be a little easier.  You get used to checking labels and avoiding certain things and change your eating habits.  A simple whole foods diet is good for beginners as it avoids most hazards with processed foods and saves a lot of time and worry when purchasing foods.  You may end up cooking more but you know what you are eating too.  You can always branch out to more processed foods after you get a handle on the basics.

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I got rid of all wooden things in my kitchen, and wiped down all surfaces that used to hold flour, etc.  I wiped down the toaster oven good initially.  Yep... it's the nurse in us!

 

Debbie RN

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My diagnosis ocurred during my 25th wedding anniversary.  I tossed a lot of things that were just worn out and old.   It was a great excuse to spend money.  This included most plastics (Tupperware-type items go funny anyway....), wooden items, mixer, speciality baking pans (too hard to clean), etc.  I kept my favorite cookie sheets and i use parchment paper as gluten-free dough tends to stick.  I kept my ancient Revere pots after a good scrub and cleaned and re-seasoned my cast iron.  ( Bake super high temperature).   Some things were already dedicated to my hubby as he had been gluten-free long before me.  

Actually,  it did not cost a lot as I am a bargain shopper. 

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We try to use glass whenever possible for storing leftovers now, in part due to the leaching of chemicals out of plastics... even BPA free.... plus the plastic holds in more bacteria, etc.  I still have to use it for freezing some things, but I try to use as much glass as humanly possible.  You especially don't want to put acidic things in plastic as the acid degrades the plastic.... and where do those particles go?  Yep... right in  YOUR  food!

Debbie

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