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Pumpkin2017

Not Celiac - is it ok to reduce rather than eliminate gluten?

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Hi there, 

 

First of all, I apologise to anyone who might feel offended by my posting in a Celiac forum when I'm not Celiac, it's just that you guys are the experts and Iºve tried other forums and they just rubbish me going gluten at all!

To give some background, I am 30 and found out last year I have Aspergers/Autism Spectrum disorder. I've been Vegan all my life, so my diet is already quite restricted if I eat out/with others. I read that cutting out gluten is one of the first things people do when they find out they have an autism spectrum disorder, so after I found out, I cut out all gluten. That was maybe 9 months ago. 

Admittedly, before this I was suffering from bloating almost every day, which my housemate blamed on gluten, and that seems to have disappeared. I also used ot feel irritated and stressed like all the time and like I couldn't stand people being physically close to me. It's difficult to say because so many other factors play a part (I've also been taking loads of supplements, B12, D3, probiotics, B-complex, Inositol, 5-htp) etc. so I donºt know what's changed my mood, but basically, I had kind of adapted to this diet. 

The problem is that my boyfriend is neither Vegan nor gluten free, and us trying to balance our meal requirements is really, really affecting our relationship. As a Vegan A LOT of the protein sources will either be from wheat or gluten, so not eating gluten means I've really limited what Vegan options are available, which then makes cooking with my boyfriend a nightmare. We pretty much stopped eating out unless it's for Indian and me being both Vegan and gluten-free is really putting a strain on our relationship. 

Its tough because I'm currently waiting for test results about other autoimmune conditions, one related to my eyes, another to my platelets, so I think there are some definate inflammation issues going on. I've been drinking a teaspoon of turmeric powder in soya milk twice a day for this, after hearing it helps anxiety, and I'm shocked at how much better I feel. I definately want to keep inflammation down. 

I feel like I need to compromise somehow with my boyfriend and ease things up a bit. Over Christmas I ate gluten when there were no alternatives, it was the first time in 9 months, and honestly, I didn't notice any negative consequences, not in terms of bloating or digestive issues. I was drinking the turmeric and kombucha every day... anyway it got me wondering if it would be ok to just eat gluten 2/3 times a week at dinner with my boyfriend? I'm wondering if introducing probiotics and the turmeric into my diet is mitigating the impact of gluten... I've heard that people can heal their gut and then get over food intolerances but I don't know enough about this...

I'd be grateful for any insight. Thanks in advance guys :)

Edited by Pumpkin2017

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I have celiac on top of Asperger myself and live on a mostly vegan diet due to digestive issues. Personally I would never go back on gluten unless you paid me a whole lot of money.  As for compromising there are plenty of dishes you can still cook and make for someone used to a normal diet. I do it all the time for a few friends, I found jackfruit and BBQ sauce makes a great chopped BBQ that most can not tell the difference. I found using rice and beans when cooking for others works out great, sticking to nice hearty soups, stir frys, etc. Cumin, and liquid smoke really bring out a meat like flavor in soups, veggie chilis, and other dishes. As for breads only make myself nut based ones, but I use blends of gluten-free oats and oat flour with almond meal, and garfava flour when making breads for others. As per diet at least you can have corn, I am allergic to it and that offers a whole other spectrum as you can use corn tortillas to make great dumplings, and I really miss having tamales. There are plenty of vegan cheeses out hter like god for heart and lisanatti that work amazing in various dishes, I used beanito chips (both the chipolte, and garden salsa ones) pulsed in a food processor for a breading on lisanatti mozzarella cut into sticks and deep fried them in coconut oil for a friend, these also made awesome hush puppies that they could not get enough of when served. I have recently even made my own queso and a version of cashew mozzarella sauce that stays in the melty state all the time and is a hit with everyone who tries it.

Trick is to compromise with others, it is your health, do whats best for you and see if you two can make dishes that he likes using ingredients you can eat. I think it will be a great experience to help deepen your relationship. If he can not stay with you now through these trying times, then perhaps he is not the one. Sorry if I offend you or anything on the matter just my point for view.

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To my best knowledge, any person with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity has to avoid gluten completely. Also, while autism is not correlated with celiac disease, it may be the case of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as some studies speculate:

The above data suggest that removing gluten from the diet may positively affect the clinical outcome in some children diagnosed with ASD, indicating that autism may be part of the spectrum of NCGS, at least in some cases. However, a word of caution is necessary to stress the fact that only a small, selected sub-group of children affected by ASD may benefit from an elimination diet. Additional investigations are required in order to identify phenotypes based on best- and non-response to dietary modifications and assess any biological correlates including anthropometry before considering a dietary intervention.

Source https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820047/

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is mostly diagnosed by the easing of symptoms with gluten avoidance, and their return with gluten reintroduction; also, celiac disease has to be excluded. Therefore i would suggest you to keep a diary of your symptoms, to see if gluten consumption make the symptoms come back. If they do, you will probably have to avoid gluten completely.

While i haven't been diagnosed with ASD i too have some behavioural disturbances which seem to respond to diet, even if i still have to identify the culprits (gluten may not be the only one). Also, i intermittently suffer from dry eyes and nosebleeds, is it your case too?

To further answer your questions, it is unlikely that probiotics can mitigate the effects of gluten sensitivity, but they may mitigate another condition called SIBO which can cause symptoms similar to gluten sensitivity. In that case, a low fodmap diet would be best, along with proper treatments.

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1 hour ago, Ennis_TX said:

I have celiac on top of Asperger myself and live on a mostly vegan diet due to digestive issues. Personally I would never go back on gluten unless you paid me a whole lot of money.  As for compromising there are plenty of dishes you can still cook and make for someone used to a normal diet. I do it all the time for a few friends, I found jackfruit and BBQ sauce makes a great chopped BBQ that most can not tell the difference. I found using rice and beans when cooking for others works out great, sticking to nice hearty soups, stir frys, etc. Cumin, and liquid smoke really bring out a meat like flavor in soups, veggie chilis, and other dishes. As for breads only make myself nut based ones, but I use blends of gluten-free oats and oat flour with almond meal, and garfava flour when making breads for others. As per diet at least you can have corn, I am allergic to it and that offers a whole other spectrum as you can use corn tortillas to make great dumplings, and I really miss having tamales. There are plenty of vegan cheeses out hter like god for heart and lisanatti that work amazing in various dishes, I used beanito chips (both the chipolte, and garden salsa ones) pulsed in a food processor for a breading on lisanatti mozzarella cut into sticks and deep fried them in coconut oil for a friend, these also made awesome hush puppies that they could not get enough of when served. I have recently even made my own queso and a version of cashew mozzarella sauce that stays in the melty state all the time and is a hit with everyone who tries it.

Trick is to compromise with others, it is your health, do whats best for you and see if you two can make dishes that he likes using ingredients you can eat. I think it will be a great experience to help deepen your relationship. If he can not stay with you now through these trying times, then perhaps he is not the one. Sorry if I offend you or anything on the matter just my point for view.

 

Thank you so much Ennix, I can see I really need to pull my finger out and learn how to give this a proper shot, learn how to cook properly and give this a proper shot. Thank you for all your ideas and recipes (especially ones that bring out meaty tastes because I have no idea what they are and suspect my boyfriend finds hat hardest!) I will go over all this again and try out some of your ideas :) 

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24 minutes ago, Leotto said:

To my best knowledge, any person with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity has to avoid gluten completely. Also, while autism is not correlated with celiac disease, it may be the case of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as some studies speculate:

The above data suggest that removing gluten from the diet may positively affect the clinical outcome in some children diagnosed with ASD, indicating that autism may be part of the spectrum of NCGS, at least in some cases. However, a word of caution is necessary to stress the fact that only a small, selected sub-group of children affected by ASD may benefit from an elimination diet. Additional investigations are required in order to identify phenotypes based on best- and non-response to dietary modifications and assess any biological correlates including anthropometry before considering a dietary intervention.

Source https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820047/

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is mostly diagnosed by the easing of symptoms with gluten avoidance, and their return with gluten reintroduction; also, celiac disease has to be excluded. Therefore i would suggest you to keep a diary of your symptoms, to see if gluten consumption make the symptoms come back. If they do, you will probably have to avoid gluten completely.

While i haven't been diagnosed with ASD i too have some behavioural disturbances which seem to respond to diet, even if i still have to identify the culprits (gluten may not be the only one). Also, i intermittently suffer from dry eyes and nosebleeds, is it your case too?

To further answer your questions, it is unlikely that probiotics can mitigate the effects of gluten sensitivity, but they may mitigate another condition called SIBO which can cause symptoms similar to gluten sensitivity. In that case, a low fodmap diet would be best, along with proper treatments.

 

Hi Leotto, I'm kind of freaked out after reading your post... not in a bad way, but when I mentioned auto-immune conditions the specific ones I may' suffer from (I am still waiting for results of tests so I don't know the cause) are chronic dry eyes that have gone on for years and years, and chronicly low platelets (which is associated with failure of the blood to clot, and may cause something like, say, your nosebleeds). How would these things be related? And why would I still have these symptoms whilst on a gluten free diet for the last 9 months? 

I believe there may be some digestive aspect to autism spectrum disorder, and other neurological conditions, afterall, the guy who linked vaccines to autism was a gastroenterologist who said the vaccines were causing autism via a digestive issue, its just that I don't notice any improvement in my Aspergers symptoms by cutting out gluten, I just know that many people with autism complain of digestive problems in general and therefore can't tolerate many things others can, hence many parents of autistic kids giving their kids enzymes and probiotics to help with that. Personally for me it's carrots that really mess up my digestive system. 

Ok, so to summarise, if I have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, I have to avoid gluten completely. So not even once a month at a restaurant? Because honestly I think I can handle being bloated the next day if it helps my relationship :) Or are there more severe health consequences I'm not aware of?

I definately think my bloating has resolved since quitting gluten. Yet I ate gluten over Christmas and didn't notice any bad effects. Yet I did in the past with the terrible bloating. Is it possible that only in small amounts or rare occasions it's ok?

Sorry, I know I'm just repeating my questions in the hope the answer will be different lol. Thank you so much both of you for your help, if there are any resources or books I should read on this topic I would be grateful for some links. And yes I'll buy a gluten free recipe book lol. Thank you!

 

 

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On another note, I read a thread on pheonix rising forum called 'I cured my anxiety with these three supplements', one was Turmeric, one was flaxseed oil (which really helps with my eyes) and the other was NAG, which I've not tried, but apparently it helps with the mucus linking of the gut. The guy said taking them cured his anxiety, presumably because they were treating leaky gut/inflammation and thus helping his neurological state. But I've not tried NAG so couldn't comment. 

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Hi Pumpkin,

Not enough is known about NCGS to tell if it does any long term damage yet, or what levels of ingestion could be harming people.  You might want to try a FODMAP free diet though and see if that helps your symptoms.

Have you had your vitamin and mineral levels checked lately?  In celiac there are problems absorbing many vitamins and  minerals.  They call that malabsorption.  Usually after being gluten-free a while a celiac will heal enough to absorb nutrients better.  But it may take a year or more for that to happen.

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Hi Pumpkin,

Reading your initial post my first reaction was 'how do you know you're not celiac?' Forgive me if I've missed it but have you actually been tested for it? You suffered from bloating and mood swings and noticed a reaction to the gluten free diet, all of which would suggest you need to definitively exclude celiac before considering NCGS? If you've not done that it should be your first port of call because then the question of occasional breaks from the gluten-free diet wouldn't even occur - no exceptions at any time would be the rule.

After that, NCGS is as GFinDC suggests still a bit of a mystery. There are promising signs of a blood test on the way and there is research in how it may differ from celiac but none of this is likely to have filtered down to local medical professionals. In my case once celiac was excluded they don't really know what to say although my gastro told me to exclude gluten for life based on my reaction to the challenge and I'd already reached the same conclusion.  

I tested negative for celiac so by exclusion that would be my diagnosis, but I would never dream of eating gluten, even if it scored me a date with Kate Beckinsdale (well actually if you're reading this Kate don't take that as a definite definite...) it affects my nervous system, my eyesight, gives me chest pains from hell, backache, skin problems etc etc including perhaps worst of all a feeling of  depression, hopelessness and brain fog. The cheesecake hasn't been conceived of that could make up for all that! I live as if I have celiac and sometimes when I read of people here only diagnosed via capsule endoscopy or by specific blood tests I think I may well have it in any case.  You may find others who say they can have a 'small amount' or occasional treat, but then you'll find deluded celiacs saying the same thing, a guy I know with a bona fide celiac diagnosis told me he could drink lager now as his stomach had 'healed'...

Of course giving up gluten isn't easy in this world and doubly so for you as a vegan. If you look here and elsewhere on the web you will find more ideas on foods you can eat however and if you can find a restaurant you trust there's no reason you can't go there with your boyfriend and just order something simple and safe. It's the company he's enjoying not watching you eat breadsticks or pizza!

Best of luck figuring this out :)

 

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Oh man... no no no I don't wanna be Celiac/gluten intolerant!!!! Lol. I can see though everybody is pretty adamant gluten is a baddy. But if I were Celiac I would've had a reaction during this period of eating gluten over Christmas wouldn't I? And the symptoms would be worse than daily bloating/occasional paralysed digestion wouldn't they? I mean Celiacs get really ill from even a little gluten don't they?

I remember my mum always complaining about how she thought she was intolerant to gluten because she had diarrea (bad spelling I know) all the time.

When I quit eating gluten I had the most awful, awful, awful pain throughout my body, like agonising back ache. I've had it on and off with occasional joint pain over the last 6 months and one doctor thought it might be Lupus (waiting for blood test results) though I think it was more overdosing on B12 without enough potassium.. but anyway, after quitting gluten there was definately a horrible withdrawal process. Is that the case for everybody who quits gluten or only those who have issues with it?  How does it affect your eyesight Jmg?

Out of interest, how long would it take for neurological issues to heal after quitting gluten? I've had bouts of depression ever since I can remember and chronic OCD and anxiety, which I'm finally starting to get under control. I'm curious that one of the things that seems to help me most is the turmeric, an anti-inflammatory agent. Is healing from gluten-damage progressive then? In other words, is 9 months not long enough to truly see the results of a gluten elimination diet? I confess I eat oats which are probably contaminated with gluten but that's the only thing. 

Can anybody recommend any good books/documentaries on this topic as I realise I'm asking really stupid basic questions! 

Thank you for the support and information, I am realising just how little I do not know about this subject!

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I do not have great advice on this, other then get the blood work done (TTG, EMA and DGP). Try the diet again and see how you feel. 

But, be careful with supplements. You are probably pretty safe with some b12 and d. But you can overdo a b complex. 

And as much as I love kombucha, in great amounts it can contribute to yeast and bacteria issues. You may want to consider not drinking it daily. 

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47 minutes ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

Oh man... no no no I don't wanna be Celiac/gluten intolerant!!!! Lol. I can see though everybody is pretty adamant gluten is a baddy. But if I were Celiac I would've had a reaction during this period of eating gluten over Christmas wouldn't I? And the symptoms would be worse than daily bloating/occasional paralysed digestion wouldn't they? I mean Celiacs get really ill from even a little gluten don't they?

I remember my mum always complaining about how she thought she was intolerant to gluten because she had diarrea (bad spelling I know) all the time.

When I quit eating gluten I had the most awful, awful, awful pain throughout my body, like agonising back ache. I've had it on and off with occasional joint pain over the last 6 months and one doctor thought it might be Lupus (waiting for blood test results) though I think it was more overdosing on B12 without enough potassium.. but anyway, after quitting gluten there was definately a horrible withdrawal process. Is that the case for everybody who quits gluten or only those who have issues with it?  How does it affect your eyesight Jmg?

Out of interest, how long would it take for neurological issues to heal after quitting gluten? I've had bouts of depression ever since I can remember and chronic OCD and anxiety, which I'm finally starting to get under control. I'm curious that one of the things that seems to help me most is the turmeric, an anti-inflammatory agent. Is healing from gluten-damage progressive then? In other words, is 9 months not long enough to truly see the results of a gluten elimination diet? I confess I eat oats which are probably contaminated with gluten but that's the only thing. 

Can anybody recommend any good books/documentaries on this topic as I realise I'm asking really stupid basic questions! 

Thank you for the support and information, I am realising just how little I do not know about this subject!

There is such thing as silent celiacs disease, you get the gut damage, and nutrient issues, but you show no signs outwardly or minimum symptoms (Don't quote me on this). As for testing for celiac you have to be eating gluten daily for the test to be done correctly, at least a cracker or half a slice of bread a day for 12 weeks for the blood test or 2 weeks for the endoscope and biopsy. We refer to this testing process as the gluten challenge, and with what you said seems quite plausible for you to try. This way you can show a medical reason if you have one to avoid gluten to your significant other, while also eliminating this as a source of your ailments. Celiac disease is a auto immune disease that effects everyone a little differently. For me my immune system goes after the gluten and also attacks my intestines and nervous system, This causes very noticeable symptoms for me, which vary depending on how much I ate and the form it was in. But it has also compromised my body and digestive tract making it so I have a very limited diet while healing. But again everyone is very different on how it effects them and the signs it shows.

As per time frames, neurological damage is the slowest to heal, if ever. My hands still have minimal feeling in them from the nerve damage, but I have noticed a tad improvement (or just my imagination being hopeful). And my mind is noticeably clearer with more and more days going where I feel great. Gut and intestinal damage I hear you can notice changes in the first few years, I am going on 3-4 years now and can just now being able to add some foods that used to bother me. Hopefully in the next 2-4 years I might be able to eat peanuts again lol.

Also any gluten introduced in the diet can cause a set back a tad bit. Your immune system with celiacs will keep producing antibodies for weeks or months after exposure causing damage. I feel the grog for days and do not get to feeling great again for a few weeks after minor contamination.  And to your oats, gluten-free Harvest oats are gluten-free and so some people like Bobs Red Mills. Some celiacs react to oats no matter what in a similar fashion to gluten.

Supplement issues I find myself taking a bunch of B vitamins supplements, anti-stress supplements, neurological supplements, etc. On top of eating foods rich in vitamins in a very balanced fashion making sure each meal has a bit of each in them.

I have found nutritional yeast to be a god send and make cheeses, seasonings and sauces with it all the time.  Just made  vegan Alfredo sauce with a bit of cumin and poultry seasoning sprinkled on top the other day over a no carb fettachini bowl with a protein shake side for dinner last night. Tasted like chicken to me but I put a can of shredded chicken in the left overs I am delivering to my father for his lunch today. (this is another way to compromise a bit).

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1 hour ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

Oh man... no no no I don't wanna be Celiac/gluten intolerant!!!! Lol. I can see though everybody is pretty adamant gluten is a baddy. But if I were Celiac I would've had a reaction during this period of eating gluten over Christmas wouldn't I? And the symptoms would be worse than daily bloating/occasional paralysed digestion wouldn't they? I mean Celiacs get really ill from even a little gluten don't they?

some people have celiac disease with no symptoms at all or no classic symptoms. I had absolutely no reaction after eating gluten would have never suspected it.

i'm vegetarian and gluten free its definitely not easy. have you tried making meals that you can make the same meal but slightly different like fried rice/noodles with vegetables and tofu then your boyfriend could add meat and egg. Same with gluten-free Pasta with vegetables, then he could add meat and cheese. I also have tacos and wraps a lot so you can choose your own fillings.

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4 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

...

When I quit eating gluten I had the most awful, awful, awful pain throughout my body, like agonising back ache. I've had it on and off with occasional joint pain over the last 6 months and one doctor thought it might be Lupus (waiting for blood test results) though I think it was more overdosing on B12 without enough potassium.. but anyway, after quitting gluten there was definitely a horrible withdrawal process. Is that the case for everybody who quits gluten or only those who have issues with it?  How does it affect your eyesight Jmg?

...

Hi Pumpkin,

A person with no reaction to gluten should not notice any change from not eating it.  So, your average Joe who eats gluten all the time wouldn't notice any change, except they might lose weight from not eating so many carbs.  Gluten is not a required nutrient in our diets.  I am not saying it is good for anyone either, just that most people wouldn't have symptoms after quitting eating gluten.  If you have any kind of symptoms changes after quitting gluten, that is a pretty good indicator that your body is having a reaction to something in the gluten.  That is actually a good test tool, it is called an elimination diet.  Since people with celiac disease can develop reactions to other foods besides gluten, an elimination diet can be helpful to find those other food intolerances.

Symptoms are really variable among people with celiac disease.   Which is one reason it can be hard to recognize/diagnose for doctors.  Nerve damage including brain damage is possible and not a symptom that people generally associate with celiac disease.  The worst form of that is probably gluten ataxia.  There is also a skin condition called dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) that some people get.  And joint pain and hair loss, and this and that etc.

Dr. Peter Green is a a celiac researcher who writes books on it.  Dr.  Alessio Fassano is another researcher and well known in the celiac field.  You can find video talks by Dr. Fassano on Youtube.

Nerve damage is generally the slowest to heal.  Sometimes celiacs are low on B-12 and other vitamins that our bodies need to function and heal.  The B-12 is important for nerve health.

Vitamin D is another vitamin some of us end up low on.  You can get vitamin D from oily fish like sardines, salmon, mackeral, and tuna.  otherwise you pretty much are stuck having stay out in the summer sun a whole lot more than is safe, or taking vitamin D pills.

Edited by GFinDC

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It's true you won't find much gluten love here, I have to fight the temptation to see it's ill effects in everyone! Even so, the reality is celiac is not as easily pigeon holed as you may think:

7 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

But if I were Celiac I would've had a reaction during this period of eating gluten over Christmas wouldn't I?

Not necessarily

7 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

And the symptoms would be worse than daily bloating/occasional paralysed digestion wouldn't they?

Not neccesarily

8 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

after quitting gluten there was definately a horrible withdrawal process.

My spider sense is tingling...

8 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

How does it affect your eyesight Jmg?

See this thread:

 

8 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

I confess I eat oats which are probably contaminated with gluten but that's the only thing. 

Almost definitely unless they specify gluten free, they're milled on the same equipment as wheat, grown next to wheat etc. etc. Even the gluten-free variety can cause a reaction in some in any case due to similar proteins in oats.

8 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

Can anybody recommend any good books/documentaries on this topic as I realise I'm asking really stupid basic questions! 

This thread tho unfinished may help with some links to further info:

All the best!

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I can't thank you all enough. You've each given such considered responses packed with info... I don't know what to say. I had always heard that people with Celiac's disease cannot ever eat gluten, and I just thought that because I almost always have and the reactions only ever seemed mild, I couldn't possibly have it. I literally never thought I could have it. And then I googled it after all your comments, and, yes, I see just how many of the symptoms I have. I was completely unaware that people can have Celiacs disease and not even have digestive issues, but it can be doing potentially permanent damage to other parts of you. So many little (and big) symptoms you just don't put together. 

I can see I will have to get tested to know for sure. I have a follow-up appointment with the autoimmune diseases doctor in a month, maybe I can ask him. My GP said all my symptoms are psychological and not to go back to him, so there you go.

Sorry to moan, but I can't vent to my boyfriend or family. When I found out 9 months ago I had Aspergers my boyfriend said 'it's bad enough you're a Vegan, and now I find out you've got Aspergers and won't eat gluten'... then I got admitted to hospital with cardiac issues, investigated for autoimmune conditions... I think my boyfriend will literally leave me if it turns out I've got Celiac's disease. This whole health process is so crappy is it not?? I guess you've all been there in various ways. 

Well fine, I'll stay gluten free and get tested and I don't have to tell anyone if I have it or not. I'll just have to learn how to cook better! 

If it turns out I do have it, or gluten sensitivity and I didn't know it, you guys might have saved me my health, so thank you. I will look up all the topics and authors and recipes you've mentioned

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29 minutes ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

I. I think my boyfriend will literally leave me if it turns out I've got Celiac's disease. This whole health process is so crappy is it not?? I guess you've all been there in various ways. 

Well fine, I'll stay gluten free and get tested and I don't have to tell anyone if I have it or not. I'll just have to learn how to cook better! 

If it turns out I do have it, or gluten sensitivity and I didn't know it, you guys might have saved me my health, so thank you. I will look up all the topics and authors and recipes you've mentioned

If your boyfriend would leave you just because you have celiac he isn't worth keeping, IMHO. Hopefully you were kidding.

If you are going to get tested for celiac you need to go back on gluten for about 3 months. That should make things easier short term with your boyfriend. You have to be eating gluten for the antibodies to form that they will be looking for in your bloodwork. For some folks it can take a bit of time for a reaction to build up so you may find symptoms appearing. You may not.

 

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35 minutes ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

y GP said all my symptoms are psychological and not to go back to him, so there you go

Lot's of us have had crappy experiences with doctors sadly. I had many years of different anti depressants shoved at me to get rid of me from the consulting room when a decent physician may have asked the right questions and helped find the real culprit. Be strong, you're the world's leading expert on your body and you need to stand up for your right to feel well. 

 

37 minutes ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

I think my boyfriend will literally leave me if it turns out I've got Celiac's disease.

I certainly hope not but if so it doesn't reflect on you but on him. Anyway, give him some credit and maybe he'll rise to the challenge. Besides its not all bad news, if you do have it your likely to feel a LOT better on a strict gluten-free diet and have more energy and enthusiasm for life and maybe him as well!  He also doesnt have to worry about you eating all the chocolates/pizza/etc. :P

 

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23 hours ago, Pumpkin2017 said:

Hi Leotto, I'm kind of freaked out after reading your post... not in a bad way, but when I mentioned auto-immune conditions the specific ones I may' suffer from (I am still waiting for results of tests so I don't know the cause) are chronic dry eyes that have gone on for years and years, and chronicly low platelets (which is associated with failure of the blood to clot, and may cause something like, say, your nosebleeds). How would these things be related? And why would I still have these symptoms whilst on a gluten free diet for the last 9 months? 

I believe there may be some digestive aspect to autism spectrum disorder, and other neurological conditions, afterall, the guy who linked vaccines to autism was a gastroenterologist who said the vaccines were causing autism via a digestive issue, its just that I don't notice any improvement in my Aspergers symptoms by cutting out gluten, I just know that many people with autism complain of digestive problems in general and therefore can't tolerate many things others can, hence many parents of autistic kids giving their kids enzymes and probiotics to help with that. Personally for me it's carrots that really mess up my digestive system. 

Ok, so to summarise, if I have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, I have to avoid gluten completely. So not even once a month at a restaurant? Because honestly I think I can handle being bloated the next day if it helps my relationship :) Or are there more severe health consequences I'm not aware of?

I definately think my bloating has resolved since quitting gluten. Yet I ate gluten over Christmas and didn't notice any bad effects. Yet I did in the past with the terrible bloating. Is it possible that only in small amounts or rare occasions it's ok?

Sorry, I know I'm just repeating my questions in the hope the answer will be different lol. Thank you so much both of you for your help, if there are any resources or books I should read on this topic I would be grateful for some links. And yes I'll buy a gluten free recipe book lol. Thank you!

 

 

It seems we could have some things in common; i got essential tremor (a neurological disorder) at the age of 13 and dry eyes at 17. At the time these two conditions were unbearable in symptoms. Psychological health was deteriorating too.

The last year (at 21), next to dietary changes, dry eyes and tremor got a lot better and since then i don't take any drug to treat the symptoms. Gluten was probably the culprit, as celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are both linked with neurological and autoimmune diseases especially in untreated subjects (those who eat gluten). Sjogren's syndrome, which causes dry eyes and dry mouth (which i had) has been linked to celiac disease; there seems to be an association with gluten sensitivity too.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10201480

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17613926

To answer your question, if you have one of this two conditions, chances are that gluten interferes with your body causing effects you may not notice in the short term, but could develop in more serious problems. It would then be your best interest to know if you are celiac/GS and consequently to avoid gluten.

 

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