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sensitivity vs celiac

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What is the difference between having Gluten sensitivity and not getting too bothered after having gluten vs. Having celiac disease and still not having too bad of a reaction. Does your body get used to it? Or are some just more sensitive? If there is small cross contamination it probably wouldn't bother me.

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i think it just depends on the person, if you have celiac its still going to raise antibody levels
 and cause intestinal damage regardless of whether you have a reaction or not. i have celiac with no reaction to eating gluten, so i find it so strange that some people decide if something with gluten is ok to eat based on their reaction to it.

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Do you have celiac? You should probably get tested if you suspect it, you need to be eating it for 12 weeks prior to the blood test or 2 weeks prior to the endoscope.

Celiac is a autoimmune disease, there is a form of it called Silent Celiac where you show no outward symptoms or very little symptoms. Regardless if you have celiac any gluten or tiny amount of CC will trigger the antibodies and they WILL DAMAGE your intestines even if you do not feel the pain, vomiting or other issues. The damage will progress leading to other issues or more noticeable symptoms. You risk all kinds of issues including cancer if the damage persist. I am sure someone will give you links backing all of this up in a later post with instances of this kind of thing happening.

NCGI is more of issue where you body just does not react well to gluten, bit more noticeable, you would have the more obvious symptoms that point at your intolerant to gluten. And both of these issues have a whole list of various symptoms ranging from neurological, joint, and digestive.

Going to get some more links to post later about symptoms on them in info on silent celiac for you.

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Some info on Silent Celiac and A few other forms of the disease, along with a interesting symptom board.

"According to the World Gastroenterology Organization, celiac disease may be divided into two types: classical and non-classical.

In classical celiac disease, patients have signs and symptoms of malabsorption, including diarrhea, steatorrhea (pale, foul-smelling, fatty stools), and weight loss or growth failure in children.

In non-classical celiac disease, patients may have mild gastrointestinal symptoms without clear signs of malabsorption or may have seemingly unrelated symptoms. They may suffer from abdominal distension and pain, and/or other symptoms such as: iron-deficiency anemia, chronic fatigue, chronic migraine, peripheral neuropathy (tingling, numbness or pain in hands or feet), unexplained chronic hypertransaminasemia (elevated liver enzymes), reduced bone mass and bone fractures, and vitamin deficiency (folic acid and B12), late menarche/early menopause and unexplained infertility, dental enamel defects, depression and anxiety, dermatitis herpetiformis (itchy skin rash), etc.

Silent celiac disease is also known as asymptomatic celiac disease. Patients do not complain of any symptoms, but still experience villous atrophy damage to their small intestine. Studies show that even though patients thought they had no symptoms, after going on a strict gluten-free diet they report better health and a reduction in acid relux, abdominal bloating and distention and flatulence. First-degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) , whether or not experiencing symptoms, should always be screened, since there is a 1 in 10 risk of developing celiac disease.

The number of ways celiac disease can affect patients, combined with a lack of training in medical schools and primary care residency programs, contributes to the poor diagnosis rate in the United States. Currently it is estimated that 80% of the celiac disease population remains undiagnosed."

 

"Some people experience symptoms found in celiac disease, such as “foggy mind”, depression, ADHD-like behavior, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, headaches, bone or joint pain, and chronic fatigue when they have gluten in their diet, yet do not test positive for celiac disease. The terms non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) and non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS) are generally used to refer to this condition, when removing gluten from the diet resolves symptoms."

These are from another celiac website I found

Also meet gluten man has a nice line up of the symptoms found in celiac disease.

http://www.montana.edu/mountainsandminds/2012/fall/celiac.php

 


 
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You have been around here a while.  I assume that you have been on a gluten free diet all this time based on your previous posts.   If the gluten-free diet is not working and celiac disease or NCGI (intolerance/sensitivity) was ruled out, consider another issue or disease.  You need to determine the source of your symptoms.  No one should feel sick for that long ☹️.    I wish you well.  

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I do have celiac. Before I discovered that I felt bad but now on the diet I feel fine. I think there is CC sometimes though and I have very mild symptoms but nothing as bad as it was. So I don't think I have silent celiac,  but I guess I was just wondering if once you are on the diet, you then can have CC and not be effected as much? And my understanding now is with sensitivity you just feel like s$#& but nothing internally is effected.

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On 4/12/2017 at 3:33 AM, blahblah said:

What is the difference between having Gluten sensitivity and not getting too bothered after having gluten vs. Having celiac disease and still not having too bad of a reaction. Does your body get used to it? Or are some just more sensitive? If there is small cross contamination it probably wouldn't bother me.

I think this question is almost impossible to answer with anything deeper than an anecdotal response. There appear to be big differences between individuals as to how sensitive they are and people also find their own level of sensitivity can change over time after adopting a gluten free diet. Not to mention those whose lack of symptoms lead to the condition only being discovered once there are serious consequences. 

One point I think is worth addressing however is the inference that gluten sensitive people are not in general bothered about having gluten. This isn't my experience! Non Celiac Gluten sensitivity will I believe eventually be seen as one position on a wider celiac spectrum. It may not include the intestinal damage markers that a 'classic' celiac diagnosis requires (although watch this space), but the other symptoms can be   serious.

 

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From my experience, I believe I have always been gluten sensitive.  I can recall incidents of "indigestion," bloating, and stomach pain, as well as a 20 pound weight loss accompanied by occasional diarrhea, occurring over many years.  I was finally diagnosed in 2003 after suffering through about 12 years of "irritable bowel syndrome, during which I was prescribed Prozac, psyllium, Imodium, and Lotronex.  Also went through several tests including ultrasound and barium enema, as well as sigmoidoscopy.  Not once was gluten or celiac mentioned, although one doctor mentioned "dumping syndrome" when I landed in the ER for rehydration after a prolonged bout with diarrhea.

One does not wake up one morning with celiac disease.  It is a long process of damage caused by gluten, often without noticeable symptoms.ever having been a fan of pizza, pasta, or bread, I could go for long periods without having much distress, other than occasional bloating or flatulence.  I had always been rather anemic.  I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in 1994--Hashimodo's was mentioned--and found I had quite severe osteoporosis around 2000.  All this time I ws being treated for IBS.  

There are so many symptoms, often ignored by doctors, that are indicative of gluten sensitivity.  If a patient has a high score on fasting blood sugar levels, most doctors will monitor the patient for pre-diabetic syndrome.  In my opinion, any patient with two or more symptoms of celiac disease should be tested for gluten sensitivity to make certain that is not the cause of those symptoms.

i wonder if the food industry sponsors lectures at medical conferences on the "danger of going gluten-free" in the absence of diagnosed celiac disease.  With the ubiquity of gluten-containing ingredients in processed foods, it would certainly impact this industry if millions of consumers started choosing foods without gluten, forcing manufacturers to come up with alternatives for thickening and flavoring their products.

So it seems to me that gluten sensitivity is simply a condition which precedes celiac disease, much as insulin resistance precedes diabetes.  Would a doctor tell a patient to wait until s/he has full blown diabetes before treating it?  Maybe a patient will not develop celiac disease, but there are many other conditions which can cause trouble and expense to both the patient and the medical profession. I know my celiac disease cost me years of pain and physical symptoms, and a number of expensive tests and diagnostic procedures, all of which could have been forestalled by a simple blood test.  Incidentally, I have never had a biopsy, but have been symptom- free for 14 years, and my recent bone density scan returned with a diagnosis of normal.

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