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RaRaLorna

Gluten Free, but is it Really?!?!

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I just bought a big old box of trail mix packages from Sam's Club (first time shopping in there with the kids since diagnosis) it had GLUTEN FREE written all over the box, and it's all over each individual package, but when I got home and looked closer at the box it says manufactured on shared equipment with wheat!!!! How can they have the GLUTEN FREE labeling all over it when it's been on shared equipment? So is it safe to use? Or is it not? Should I donate it to church? Of course I gave a package to each of them in the car to eat on the way home :( So Frustrating! 

Also, what's everyone's opinions on Gluten Free Cheerios? I've read so much that says don't do it, but of course my husband told my daughter she could have some. 

Thanks!

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The cheerios are STILL making many celiacs sick. They separate the oats from the wheat contamination mechanically. This does not really work and has been causing hot spots where your playing Russian roulette on if you get a good box or a bad box......as to the same club, I would not trust them.     Here is a list of some safe foods, BTW if you want a cheerios like food go with Vans's Gluten free ones they have some strawberry and other flavored ones. I keep them on hand for a friend who sometimes stays over.

https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

  Everything from entree, staples, breakfast, ramen, soups, condiments, chips, burritos, hot pocket knock offs, etc. I have complied a list of trusted companies, places to get goods, and ways to order them from stores.


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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Hi :)

Just to add whenever I see this: 

9 hours ago, RaRaLorna said:

manufactured on shared equipment with wheat!

I (albeit sometimes reluctantly) pass on the product. They could just be covering their ass, but any warning that would impact on sales is only on that package for a reason. There's nearly always a safe acceptable alternative so why take the risk? 

 

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Just an FYI- Unless it says "Dedicated gluten-free facility" or you call on everything, the "made on/in/shred equipment" is all voluntary labeling.  So just because it doesn't say "made on" doesn't mean it isn't.  They will most likely say "we use industry standards for cleaning equipment between batches" in many cases. 

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Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe companies can label foods "gluten free" as long as they have no gluten containing products in the ingredients.  "Gluten free" labeled foods can still be highly cross contaminated and even test above the 20 ppm standard.  I've started only purchasing foods labeled with the "certified gluten free" label as I believe they are tested as less than 10 ppm (once again, correct me if I'm wrong!) 

We think our daughter cannot tolerate oats even if gluten free, so Cheerios are definitely out for us.  We really did love the Van's products (crackers, bars, cereal), but most are made with oats.


Mom to 2 young kids with celiac, diagnosed March 2015

*Gluten free household

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 T

12 minutes ago, CeliacMommaX2 said:

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe companies can label foods "gluten free" as long as they have no gluten containing products in the ingredients.  "Gluten free" labeled foods can still be highly cross contaminated and even test above the 20 ppm standard.  I've started only purchasing foods labeled with the "certified gluten free" label as I believe they are tested as less than 10 ppm (once again, correct me if I'm wrong!) 

We think our daughter cannot tolerate oats even if gluten free, so Cheerios are definitely out for us.  We really did love the Van's products (crackers, bars, cereal), but most are made with oats.

Ok....you said correct you....lol

i am assuming US.  It can be a bit different in different countries.

The US law does not require actual testing....but, your food must be <20 ppm.  So, most big companies that say " gluten-free" on the package are very sure of that fact.  It is  a legal nightmare for them if the food is tested and not <20 ppm.  What I mean is, if they are asked to prove it, they better be able to prove <20 ppm.

Various " certifying" agencies have different requirements for gluten-free.  What you should understand, is that they train a company ( could be anything from providing basic instructions to a short training course) and that isnit.  They do not come around and do random checks or require the company to send them samples.

Most of this " certified gluten-free" pertains to baked goods & noodles.  There are major companies that make entirely gluten-free products -Schar, Glutino, Udis, etc.  that does not mean that a can of tomato sauce or a block of cheddar, not labelled gluten-free are not safe,  

 

Edited by kareng
Spell check hates " Udis"

 

 

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5 minutes ago, kareng said:

 T

Ok....you said correct you....lol

i am assuming US.  It can be a bit different in different countries.

The US law does not require actual testing....but, your food must be <20 ppm.  So, most big companies that say " gluten-free" on the package are very sure of that fact.  It is  a legal nightmare for them if the food is tested and not <20 ppm.  What I mean is, if they are asked to prove it, they better be able to prove <20 ppm.

Various " certifying" agencies have different requirements for gluten-free.  What you should understand, is that they train a company ( could be anything from providing basic instructions to a short training course) and that isnit.  They do not come around and do random checks or require the company to send them samples.

Most of this " certified gluten-free" pertains to baked goods & noodles.  There are major companies that make entirely gluten-free products -Schar, Glutino, Udis, etc.  that does not mean that a can of tomato sauce or a block of cheddar, not labelled gluten-free are not safe,  

 

Thank you for the corrections!  I hope I didn't lead anyone wrong!  Sad, that after 2 years, I'm still not sure about all of the labeling!!!!


Mom to 2 young kids with celiac, diagnosed March 2015

*Gluten free household

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On ‎4‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 10:01 PM, CeliacMommaX2 said:

Thank you for the corrections!  I hope I didn't lead anyone wrong!  Sad, that after 2 years, I'm still not sure about all of the labeling!!!!

Companies get so sneaky with labeling.  I stick with the companies that are dedicated gluten free if I am buying processed foods.  Most will have a website with a section under Frequent Q&A's.  If they don't, email or call to get clarification as to how the item is processed.  I know that my family can't eat anything that has been made on a shared line and then cleaned.  Good Luck....   

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I am from Canada and we were told at our Children's Hospital NOT to eat Cheerios. We were so excited that we had one box of cereal in our cupboard that has been a staple in my house for over 20 years that we were going to be able to keep. Then we were told that while they are considered gluten free and have it on the box, they are not safe for people with Celiac.  Such a disappointment!  Glad Chex and Brown Rice Krisipies are okay, learning to like both!

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4 minutes ago, celiacmom774 said:

I am from Canada and we were told at our Children's Hospital NOT to eat Cheerios. We were so excited that we had one box of cereal in our cupboard that has been a staple in my house for over 20 years that we were going to be able to keep. Then we were told that while they are considered gluten free and have it on the box, they are not safe for people with Celiac.  Such a disappointment!  Glad Chex and Brown Rice Krisipies are okay, learning to like both!

Cheerios have been hit and miss for years, it has to do with how they get and sort the oats, the processing etc. Even the testing they do is iffy, there are reports STILL coming in about them making celiacs sick. We normally suggest avoiding oats for the first few months then if you want try reintroducing gluten-free certified ones (I suggest gluten-free Harvest if any) If you still crave O type cereal Vans makes some along with a few other brands.  I personally stick to nut meal based porridge and a few expensive nut based versions of stuff ( I can not tolerate grains or carbs well)


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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1 hour ago, celiacmom774 said:

I am from Canada and we were told at our Children's Hospital NOT to eat Cheerios. We were so excited that we had one box of cereal in our cupboard that has been a staple in my house for over 20 years that we were going to be able to keep. Then we were told that while they are considered gluten free and have it on the box, they are not safe for people with Celiac.  Such a disappointment!  Glad Chex and Brown Rice Krisipies are okay, learning to like both!

Regular Rice Krispies in the US and Canada are not gluten free.  They contain Barley Malt.  See the below ingredients of the Rice Krispies in Canada...

Ingredients:

Rice, sugar, salt, corn and barley malt extract, Vitamins and minerals: iron, niacinamide, thiamine hydrochloride, cholecalciferol (vitamin d3), pyridoxine hydrochloride, d-calcium pantothenate, folic acid.

http://www.kelloggs.ca/en_CA/rice-krispies-cereal-product.html

 

 

Edited by BergieF
Edited to show regular Rice Krispies not to refer to Brown Rice Krispies in Canada.

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1 hour ago, BergieF said:

Regular Rice Krispies in the US and Canada are not gluten free.  They contain Barley Malt.  See the below ingredients of the Rice Krispies in Canada...

Ingredients:

Rice, sugar, salt, corn and barley malt extract, Vitamins and minerals: iron, niacinamide, thiamine hydrochloride, cholecalciferol (vitamin d3), pyridoxine hydrochloride, d-calcium pantothenate, folic acid.

http://www.kelloggs.ca/en_CA/rice-krispies-cereal-product.html

 

 

They said brown rice  crispies :) 

Whole grain brown rice, sugar, salt, bht Vitamins and minerals: iron, thiamine hydrochloride, cholecalciferol (vitamin d3), niacinamide, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, d-calcium pantothenate.

http://www.kelloggs.ca/en_CA/rice-krispies-brown-rice-gluten-free-cereal-product.html

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57 minutes ago, Victoria1234 said:

They said brown rice  crispies :) 

Whole grain brown rice, sugar, salt, bht Vitamins and minerals: iron, thiamine hydrochloride, cholecalciferol (vitamin d3), niacinamide, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, d-calcium pantothenate.

http://www.kelloggs.ca/en_CA/rice-krispies-brown-rice-gluten-free-cereal-product.html

I had edited my comment earlier to show that I was talking about regular Rice Krispies.  My eyes skipped over the "BROWN" in the post. 

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Yes, the ones I have are the brown rice krispies.  My 13 year old daughter was just diagnosed with Celiac. Two of my other children have allergies to peanuts and nuts. Has anyone come across any other good cereals available in Canada that are both gluten and nut free?  Many of the gluten-free products I find either contain nuts or have a peanut/nut warning on the label.  I have lived with have peanut/nut allergies in the house for 19 years, but only on the first month of eating gluten free. Any suggestions of gluten free /nut free products available in Canada would be greatly appreciated.

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10 minutes ago, celiacmom774 said:

Yes, the ones I have are the brown rice krispies.  My 13 year old daughter was just diagnosed with Celiac. Two of my other children have allergies to peanuts and nuts. Has anyone come across any other good cereals available in Canada that are both gluten and nut free?  Many of the gluten-free products I find either contain nuts or have a peanut/nut warning on the label.  I have lived with have peanut/nut allergies in the house for 19 years, but only on the first month of eating gluten free. Any suggestions of gluten free /nut free products available in Canada would be greatly appreciated.

https://www.mygerbs.com/

They have seeds, fruit, etc all Nut, Peanut, and Gluten free. Look up Enjoy Life products also as they are free of all major allergens. >.< I have issues with peanuts myself but carbs/grains/sugars/corn are my other issues and I live on almonds and coconut. Unsure which of us have it worse lol.


Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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