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Washingtonmama

Can you help settle this between my husband and I?

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 I was diagnosed about a month ago. I have mild symptoms...itchy spots and diarrhea a few times, when I eat gluten. I don't seem to be very sensitive when I have eaten gluten. My daughter with Celiac has more severe symptoms. My 11-year-old with Celiac has no symptoms. My husband thinks I have gone overboard buying new pans, replacing wooden and plastic cooking utensils, etc. Last night I was trying to decide whether or not to use the mixing paddle on my Kitchen Aide. It is scratched pretty badly in some spots. I explained, again, about the gluten protein and he says a minuscule amount won't hurt. I told him your body can't distinguish the SIZE of the gluten protein, it reacts to a lot of the gluten protein or a little. If I am wrong, I will admit it and change how I am doing things. I used the paddle, ate some yummy gluten-free cookie dough, and woke up foggy headed and a mild migraine. Could be a reaction to minuscule gluten from the mixing paddle, or it could be my imagination. 

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WE all react differently to different amounts, but regardless any amount will trigger the antibodies that damage our body. Gluten is a protein, like blood proteins, if you do not trust cleaning it where a CSI tech will not find it then do not trust it. As it is a protein molecule,.....it is smaller then a germ. As it is a protein it can be destroyed by extremely high heat like 550-600F in a oven cleaning cycle, most household cleaners not even bleach can kill the protein but can help move and rinse it off of smooth surfaces. Now anything porous, scratched, etc needs to be replaced. I swear by using freezer paper on my counters (also makes clean up a breeze). Sounds like the majority of your household is gluten-free I think your husband needs to get on a wagon also, just do the entire household that way will make it easier. And no your not going overboard your protecting yourself and your CHILDREN who have it.

As to the paddle....what is it made of? A pours metal? Scratched silicone, does it have a edge on where it could hide....you might have glutened yourself.

I have reacted in inhaled flour, residue on my hands touching my food after opening a glutened handle/door, and back when I lived in a shared house I vidly recall the mistake of thinking that crumb on the counter was from my cooking and eating it....only to learn my mother had made cream of wheat that morning -_- (This started the freezer paper)

I find the amount, and form of exposure cause different symptoms, Inhaled, and secondary exposure to residue normally seems to only manifest itself in neurological, and nerve issues. VERY light traces I find start the stomach issues. Straight up gluten like a crumb or more I find will lay me out on the floor, vomiting, motor loss, full 9 yards and all levels of hell then week of secondary issues.

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Imagination?  Does it matter?  Feeling safe in the one place you should be able to let down your guard is very important.  We had a shared household before my diagnosis.  Hubby was gluten free.  I did all the cooking, shopping and food prep.  It worked.  He was kept pretty safe.  That first year was rough though!  Lots of mistakes.  Then a decade later, I was diagnosed.  Add to the fact our daughter wanted to help in the kitchen, we decided that gluten had to go.  It has been great.  No one has to worry.  Our kid gets a gluten fix at lunch and while with friends.  She actually eats better than most of her teen glutening-eating friends.  (SHe has tested negative.)

Anemia was really my only symptom when I was diagnosed.  Each glutening (two big ones) has caused my symptoms to escalate.  Now, I get all the classic symptoms and have developed new issues along the way.  So, a little bit of gluten can hurt.  We all react differently.  For some, it is just  a few days of misery.  For others it is months!  

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Sounds like 3 out of 4 have an issue with celiac/gluten.  Husband needs to get with the program and be supporative.  You cook, do it your way!

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Thanks everyone! I think its hard for people to fully accept because they cant see the damage it does every time you get glutened. It's invisible. Im glad to know I wasnt being paranoid. I sure was when I was first diagnosed. I laugh at myself now, but its a pretty steep learning curve. 

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9 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

WE all react differently to different amounts, but regardless any amount will trigger the antibodies that damage our body. Gluten is a protein, like blood proteins, if you do not trust cleaning it where a CSI tech will not find it then do not trust it. As it is a protein molecule,.....it is smaller then a germ. As it is a protein it can be destroyed by extremely high heat like 550-600F in a oven cleaning cycle, most household cleaners not even bleach can kill the protein but can help move and rinse it off of smooth surfaces. Now anything porous, scratched, etc needs to be replaced. I swear by using freezer paper on my counters (also makes clean up a breeze). Sounds like the majority of your household is gluten-free I think your husband needs to get on a wagon also, just do the entire household that way will make it easier. And no your not going overboard your protecting yourself and your CHILDREN who have it.

As to the paddle....what is it made of? A pours metal? Scratched silicone, does it have a edge on where it could hide....you might have glutened yourself.

I have reacted in inhaled flour, residue on my hands touching my food after opening a glutened handle/door, and back when I lived in a shared house I vidly recall the mistake of thinking that crumb on the counter was from my cooking and eating it....only to learn my mother had made cream of wheat that morning -_- (This started the freezer paper)

I find the amount, and form of exposure cause different symptoms, Inhaled, and secondary exposure to residue normally seems to only manifest itself in neurological, and nerve issues. VERY light traces I find start the stomach issues. Straight up gluten like a crumb or more I find will lay me out on the floor, vomiting, motor loss, full 9 yards and all levels of hell then week of secondary issues.

 

Ennis, it is made out of metal, coated with plastic I think. You have such a hard time, my heart really hurts for you. But you are such a support to those on this board, and a great teacher for those of us who are new. :) 

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5 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

Imagination?  Does it matter?  Feeling safe in the one place you should be able to let down your guard is very important.  We had a shared household before my diagnosis.  Hubby was gluten free.  I did all the cooking, shopping and food prep.  It worked.  He was kept pretty safe.  That first year was rough though!  Lots of mistakes.  Then a decade later, I was diagnosed.  Add to the fact our daughter wanted to help in the kitchen, we decided that gluten had to go.  It has been great.  No one has to worry.  Our kid gets a gluten fix at lunch and while with friends.  She actually eats better than most of her teen glutening-eating friends.  (SHe has tested negative.)

Anemia was really my only symptom when I was diagnosed.  Each glutening (two big ones) has caused my symptoms to escalate.  Now, I get all the classic symptoms and have developed new issues along the way.  So, a little bit of gluten can hurt.  We all react differently.  For some, it is just  a few days of misery.  For others it is months!  

 

We have gone gluten free, our whole house, as of a month ago. It was pretty seamless since I had been gluten-free for 5 months last year. I have found many good recipes, and my picky husband and one of my boys who is also a picky eater, even prefer many gluten-free recipes to the regular ones.  My husband did see my point about the size of the gluten protein means nothing. Its a gluten protein period, that's what you are avoiding. It doesn't matter if its hiding in the scratch of your baking sheet and you can't see it. You can't see the wind, but it's still there. I hear you on the anemia. I've been anemic for several years, I just thought it as because I was getting a little older. Has your anemia gone away or do you still have problems with it? 

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I think that if you soaked in the paddle in vinegar and scrubbed it a few times, you will be fine.  But if in doubt, just set the mixer aside for a while until your family's health has improved.  In the meantime, use your arm to mix dough!  My grandma never had a mixer!  

I bought a bunch of new stuff because I had been married for 25 years when diagnosed.  It was time for new things!  

Everyone is different in their response to gluten.  Science has given us a good estimate, but we know that nothing is "one size fits all".  You just have to figure out what is best for you and your family.  

My anemia resolved within months of being gluten free (ferritin levels).  I still have Thalassemia, but it is mild and my body has adapted.  It is most likely the one reason that I never made the Olympic team!  ?

BTW, family and friends are not allowed to bring in gluten into our house with the exception of beer.  They can contribute to a potluck by bringing beverages, uncut fruit and veggies, new condiments, tableware, and ice cream ......etc.

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Next time just take a box of rat poisoning and extract ONE granule.  Toss it into his food (while he is watching) and give it a good stir.  Hand the food over and see if he is willing to eat it.

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On 4/30/2017 at 6:45 AM, frieze said:

remind your hubby, "if mama ain't happy, ain't nobody gonna be happy."

truth!  lolz!  :D

i still used my kitchen aid mixer, but always was paranoid about 100 years of regular flour sneaking out of the mixer itself (it used to be my mom's and it was well worn)   last Christmas i got a shiny new red one that doesn't sound like a bulldozer.  so, ya know, if hubs really wants to be a butthead, hit him in the wallet  ;)

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It's not just the paddle on the mixer. Ever notice how when you turn it on there is a big "poof" of flour up...into the nooks and crannies above, ready to drop down into anything you make. We had to get a new mixer.  My daughter is very sensitive and has primarily neurological symptoms. She looses the use of her right side, nerve pain, numbness, even temporary loss of sight.  She was negative for celiac, so we are now pursuing a gluten ataxia diagnosis. 

Small amounts matter, especially when the nervous system is involved.

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