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GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX.

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On 3/1/2017 at 3:00 AM, admin said:

GlidinX_article_page_plan_c.jpg

GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin, and unlike other enzyme formulas that claim to do the same, there is a growing body of research that backs up the effectiveness of GliadinX.

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Where can this product be purchased?

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Hi Bonnie,

This isn't a product that allows a celiac to eat gluten.  I think you can find the same enzyme in any DPP-4 product, which are available at vitamin retailers.  The only use for these enzymes with celiac, is to maybe help a little with symptoms after accidental glutening or cross contamination.  Even then, they won't stop an immune reaction, but might lessen the reaction a little.

Edited by GFinDC

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Nope.  I would not try this product.  Their website mentions that they developed this product for their gluten-free kids.  There is no mention of them having celiac disease.  Plus, the fine print at the bottom indicates that this product is not for celiacs or those with a gluten sensitivity (this is not a direct quote).  

Here is what the Celiac Foundation has to say:

https://celiac.org/blog/2015/08/study-demonstrates-current-enzyme-supplements-for-celiac-disease-ineffective/

And the University of Chicago:

https://sciencelife.uchospitals.edu/2014/04/01/can-glutenase-pills-help-people-with-celiac-digest-gluten/

Someday, there might be a drug that we could use to avoid cross contamination when eating out,  but it has not been developed yet.  ☹️

Edited by cyclinglady

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4 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

Someday, there might be a drug that we could use to avoid cross contamination when eating out,  but it has not been developed yet.  

That's the only usage I'd be interested in. I don't want something to allow me to eat gluten, the thought of it turns my stomach! I do like the idea however of being able to take something say whilst travelling or overseas as an extra insurance against inadvertent exposure. 

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I been advocating against this product and the post about it this month constantly. It is very confusing to new people with the disease or the uneducated who take it at face value. Sure it might help break down the protein in the gut, and make symptoms less severe, and help those with just a intolerance a bit. But this will not stop the autoimmune response which starts as soon as you put the gluten in your mouth. Celiac is a auto immune disease and reactions get triggered as soon as our bodies detect it and start producing the antibodies. This happens as soon as you start chewing it and in the stomach before it even hits the gut, where it will then go full blown nightmare for most of us.

WHY do we even have the ads for it still up on the site?

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This is actually an advertisement.

In the US, supplements, like this, do not have to go through any federal approval process.  They do not actually have to "prove" that they work.

"Real" drugs must prove they are safe and that they do what they claim.  Currently, there are medications going through clinical trials - working their way to being approved.  When they are ready for the public, I am sure we will report actual articles about it.  Reliable sites like The University of Chicago Celiac Center and the various Celiac Associations will write about it.  It may be by perscrition only.  The one I heard the researcher speak about will have very specific instructions for how to use it.

 

Edited by kareng

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Here is info about what is being tested.  IMGX is the one that seems to do what this supplement claims - degrade gluten so it doesn't cause a reaction

 

https://www.glutenfreeliving.com/blog/drug-treatments-celiac-pipeline/

"...

IMGX-003

Formerly ALV003, this oral drug combines two protein enzymes that degrade gluten. Patients who were given this medication and then a gluten challenge showed no significant signs of intestinal mucosal injury.

Already through Phase I and Phase 2, it is the only treatment that has shown both histologic success and improvement of symptoms in clinical trials. Biopharmaceutical company ImmunogenX, which acquired IMGX-003 in March 2016, plans to take it through late-phase clinical trials."

Edited by kareng

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1) This is a paid advertisement to celiac.com, but they are not paying me for this reply;

2) There is NO reason not to try this product--the prime ingredient has been shown in numerous studies to break down gluten in the gut;

3) Many celiacs could benefit from such a product--but it is NOT meant to replace a strict gluten-free diet. However, if you are like me and you like to eat out regularly, at friend's houses, and when traveling, this product could be very helpful. Especially in situations where you can't control your food, this can provide some form of mitigation, and may prevent some people form getting sick from small amounts of gluten contamination. In reality, even products marketed as "gluten-free" are not always safe, so this product could be helpful for some people even if they never eat out.

4) Their web site is linked in the article.

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Just FYI: 

GliadinX has been approved to be a sponsor for the University of Chicago spring event

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/spring-flours-gluten-free-gala/ 

They only accepted the sponsorship after reviewing the product and the research behind it. It also happened that the product was researched by Dr. Koning who worked together with Dr. Guandalini from Chicago.
 

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GFinDC,

I don't think this is the same enzyme that is in dpp-4 products.

Medicalexpress just reported digestive disease week findings on  this product.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-unique-enzyme-game-changer-gluten-sensitive-patients.html

They estimate it is 85% effective.

They note this product was not tested in Celiac patients because even small amounts of gluten can cause long term effects in celiac patients.

I hope this is helpful.

posterboy,

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PS - Here are some references:

Sources:

and here is an interesting review that estimates that up to 50% of celiacs may cheat on their diet, depending on age group. Obviously Celiac.com does not recommend it, however, it may be a fact (the surveys I did in the past showed that at least 25% do cheat regularly). So whether you are cheating, or just wanting to travel and eat out at restaurants, this particular enzyme may help mitigate potential damage.

Link:

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Thanks that's interesting. Especially:

Quote

The study found that AN-PEP, in both high and low doses, broke down gluten in both the stomach and the first part of the small intestine, or duodenum. In the stomach, gluten levels in both the high- and low-dose groups were 85 percent lower than in the placebo group. Once the food reached the duodenum, gluten levels were reduced by 81 percent in the high dose group and 87 percent in the low dose group versus placebo.

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-unique-enzyme-game-changer-gluten-sensitive-patients.html#jCp

How odd that the gluten levels were lower with the lower dose!

I'd like to have something like this on a shelf so that if I'm going to be in a place I'm not sure about I have an added level of protection. Its also good that they're positioning it like this:

Quote

"Our results suggest that this enzyme can potentially reduce the side effects that occur when gluten-sensitive individuals accidentally eat a little gluten. We are not suggesting that AN-PEP will give these individuals the ability to eat pizza or pasta, sources of large amounts of gluten, but it might make them feel better if they mistakenly ingest gluten."

Dr. König noted that her team did not test the enzyme on celiac disease patients, because even small amounts of gluten can cause long-term harm in these individuals. Because of that, she does not recommend celiac patients view this enzyme as a way to start eating any gluten.

 

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32 minutes ago, admin said:

I really think all of this is a very big deal!

Absolutely. One of the biggest limiting factors for me isn't getting a gluten free meal, there's plenty of things which are naturally gluten free which I can order. It's getting something that I can actually enjoy without worrying in the back of my mind about cross contamination. The other one is travel. I used to travel extensively and had a big list of places I still wanted to visit. After one continental trip to Denmark on the diet it lost a lot of it's appeal. Again, due to worrying in restaurants and airports. If an enzyme pill could reduce the chances of that affecting me I'd be more relaxed and would enjoy the times I do go out more. 

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I think if people are cheating on the diet, then its their problem.  Same with diabetics....many do not eat as they should with the diet so now doctors tell them they can have sugar, as long as they maintain their blood sugar levels.  Yeah...right.  I know many diabetics and they do not do a good job of it.  They are the ones eating donuts at break time and then complaining about their health not being good.

I agree that this would be useful when traveling.  I have more success with traveling because I go to places where Celiac is understood and accommodated for. I am not one to travel to remote places with language barriers but that's just me. I can understand someone's desire to do so, though.  Also, eating more high end has been a huge success for me but it does add cost to a trip....one I am willing to make to not be sick.

My rant of the day has to do with doctors, of all people, constantly whining about how hard the diet is to follow and maintain. Really?  I must be missing something here because hard it is not.  Convenient?  No, absolutely not but after 12 years, I have it down and rarely ever have a problem finding safe food when traveling. But I am not going into the wilds of Africa so maybe that's why. I just firmly believe that if a doctor imparts negativity with their patients, it sets the tone going forward. I swear they do it to guarantee repeat business.....which they will have anyway because so many people are apparently careless.

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10 minutes ago, Gemini said:

My rant of the day has to do with doctors, of all people, constantly whining about how hard the diet is to follow and maintain.

I read somewhere (here I think) just the other day that this is a deliberate tactic with patients and precisely because the stats suggest many either cheat or are not strict with the diet. The idea being that if the doctor says 'its very tough, gluten is everywhere', then the patient is more likely to confess to not being as vigilant as they might. :ph34r:

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The analogy of celiacs and diabetics isn't a great one, because modern medicine does allow them to cheat on their diets and get a away with it--insulin. Before insulin many died when they did this. It is fair for diabetics who want to eat sugar and take more insulin to be able to do so, that is their choice. I, of course, would recommend not eating any sugar, but not many do that.

If any celiacs cheat on their diets, I would definitely recommend these enzymes. Depending on how much gluten is consumed, and how many capsules are taken, they may not prevent damage 100% of the time, but certainly it is WAY better than just eating gluten and not taking anything.

Also, even at high end restaurants mistakes are made...I've experienced this, and corners are cut. You don't have to be in a foreign country to experience cross contamination. I just heard the story of a high end pizza place, which I won't name, here in Sonoma County that served a gluten-free pizza--but the celiac customer watched them use the same pizza cutter as they use for the regular gluten pizzas. In these cases having taken an enzyme pill or two beforehand would be the only possible salvation. Sure, there are many who say "just don't eat out," but to me that would cut out a large part of what I enjoy in life--eating out and at a friend's house--which I won't stop doing.

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31 minutes ago, admin said:

The analogy of celiacs and diabetics isn't a great one, because modern medicine does allow them to cheat on their diets and get a away with it--insulin. Before insulin many died when they did this. It is fair for diabetics who want to eat sugar and take more insulin to be able to do so, that is their choice. I, of course, would recommend not eating any sugar, but not many do that.

If any celiacs cheat on their diets, I would definitely recommend these enzymes. Depending on how much gluten is consumed, and how many capsules are taken, they may not prevent damage 100% of the time, but certainly it is WAY better than just eating gluten and not taking anything.

Also, even at high end restaurants mistakes are made...I've experienced this, and corners are cut. You don't have to be in a foreign country to experience cross contamination. I just heard the story of a high end pizza place, which I won't name, here in Sonoma County that served a gluten-free pizza--but the celiac customer watched them use the same pizza cutter as they use for the regular gluten pizzas. In these cases having taken an enzyme pill or two beforehand would be the only possible salvation. Sure, there are many who say "just don't eat out," but to me that would cut out a large part of what I enjoy in life--eating out and at a friend's house--which I won't stop doing.

I disagree with regards to my analogy between diabetics and those with celiac......diabetics really should not be eating sugar, except in extremely small amounts on occasion and they need to test after EVERY sugar ingestion to learn exactly how much insulin to administer....none of which the diabetics I know do. But taking insulin using injection or via pump is not the same as having your body do it precisely and as intended by nature. My brother was a Type 1, along with other people I know and none of them have/had good control over blood sugar levels because they insist they can eat that many carbs. I guess you can talk yourself into thinking you can do it successfully but the only person I think who has it right is cyclinglady. Eat to your meter is awesome advice but when I tell this to diabetics, they look at me like I'm crazy. Too much work, I am told.  Almost all the diabetics I know have trouble later in life because of a lifetime of poor blood sugar control because the doctor told them they could eat sugar. For them, they heard they can eat cake on a regular basis!  If you cheat as a diabetic on a regular basis, you will not get away with it. You will most certainly end up with heart disease from long term elevated blood sugar. I personally think it is much harder to be a diabetic than it is to have celiac. Keeping blood sugar levels low can be very difficult and time consuming.......unless you learn what spikes it for you and don't eat it.

I know mistakes are made everywhere but I guess, again, it boils down to choice. I never order pizza except from the one place that always gets it right. When I dine out, I tend to stay away from carbs and concentrate on protein and produce. The places I trust around me for eating more variety are run/owned by Celiac's, so living where I do is a huge plus. But I do not eat out often at all, except when on vacation I eat out for dinner every day.  I can't be the only Celiac who rarely ever is glutened. I also tend to favor restaurants who get it right so am a repeat customer at certain places when I travel. There are ways to travel and dine out and mitigate the chances you will take a hit by quite a bit. Even with this supplement to take, I still would follow my protocol that has worked so well for me. It may cut down on the reaction/symptoms but there is still that AI reaction that will happen. For me, having other AI diseases to boot, it stirs the pot when I am glutened and I'm getting to the age where mistakes cost more than I am willing to gamble with.

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1 hour ago, Jmg said:

I read somewhere (here I think) just the other day that this is a deliberate tactic with patients and precisely because the stats suggest many either cheat or are not strict with the diet. The idea being that if the doctor says 'its very tough, gluten is everywhere', then the patient is more likely to confess to not being as vigilant as they might. :ph34r:

Now that makes sense.......not good sense, but I see the tactic.  ;)  I think when it comes to food based diseases, good luck with that. People are so food obsessed today I am not sure that most people will ever get on board with eating better and smarter to control their conditions well.  I hate doctors so figure if I never cheat, that will go a long way to keeping me out of their offices, not to mention feeling good all the time which wasn't happening for me 15 years ago. I guess because of how sick I was, it's a huge incentive to be good. Many people never get that sick before diagnosis so have a different perspective.  The trouble is and what younger people never see.........it catches up to you in the end and then it might not end well. This is what happened to my brother. To drop dead at 60 from diabetes and, I believe, undiagnosed celiac is tragic and very sad for those of us left behind.

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Clearly the folks who don't eat out and prepare all their own meals, or those who don't travel, won't be the ones investing in these enzymes. They are obviously for those who do want to lead a more normal, which in our case means more risky, lifestyle.

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8 hours ago, admin said:

PS - Here are some references:

Sources:

and here is an interesting review that estimates that up to 50% of celiacs may cheat on their diet, depending on age group. Obviously Celiac.com does not recommend it, however, it may be a fact (the surveys I did in the past showed that at least 25% do cheat regularly). So whether you are cheating, or just wanting to travel and eat out at restaurants, this particular enzyme may help mitigate potential damage.

Link:

admin,

The way I read that research was even those on a strict gluten free diet up to 50% of the time had been cross contaminated from gluten.

Allergic living covered about how hard it can be to be gluten free unless you have a dedicated gluten free house.

Obvisouly food is very social and it is easy to feel left out.

I think it nice to have more options than we once did (but are they really good options if damage is still being done but it now only silent damage) . . .

I think that is most celiac's fear about trying a supplement that might help but feel the risk of eating gluten again might be too high to try again.

Here is the allergic living article on the topic.

http://allergicliving.com/2015/08/20/celiac-urine-test-may-offer-accurate-way-to-monitor-glutening/

here is the pubmed link https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25891988

the reason I say I thought it was cross contimination (in 50% of celiacs') because they say a "strict GFD diet".

these celiac's were taking their diet seriously . .. yet 50 of celiac's had gluten immunogenic peptides (GIPs) in the urine.

so eating at a friends house has it risks even if their are social benefits. You can always have them over to your house.

I also want to quote an article covered by jefferson adams on celiac.com that summarizes this question that celiac's will have to answer for themselves.

It is worth the risk  to have "damage" we might not see to use a proven peptide that is only on average 85% effective.

To paraphrase "so why all the hate for a supplements" that can greatly help mitigate (not 100 percent control) the  autoimmune reaction.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/24099/1/Why-All-the-Hate-for-Celiac-Disease-Drug-Treatments/Page1.html

The same question remains for drug treatments.  Would you take medicine if it existed for Celiac disease today?

The thread is old (but was very actively commented) because this is a heated topic and one worthy of discussion... .

I hope this is helpful.

posterboy,

 

 

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