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gluten confused

Best gluten-free bread

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Please, I need your opinion. Which is the best gluten-free bread and where can it be found. I have already tried Rudis and Udi's. I really didn't like them. Thank you for your valuable comments.

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Canyon Bakehouse. canyonglutenfree.com

 

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Most people swear by canyon house.....I just use Julian Bakery myself but I can not eat carbs, yeast, corn, soy, or dairy and they make almond and coconut breads....have to be toasted but I am content with them.

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1 hour ago, gluten confused said:

Please, I need your opinion. Which is the best gluten-free bread and where can it be found. I have already tried Rudis and Udi's. I really didn't like them. Thank you for your valuable comments.

I have only tried one, Trader Joe's gluten-free whole grain. It was quite good, even straight from the package w/o toasting. I'll probably not look elsewhere, as this one is just fine. 

I live in northern CA. I know not all TJ's stock the same bakery items. 

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If I buy grocery store bread, I get Canyon Bakehouse 7 grain.  I usually get my bread from a local gluten-free bakery.  You might see if you have one near you

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Canyon Bakehouse.  I buy it by the case and store in my freezer.  The store gives me a case discount.  Hubby likes it best.  The bagels are good too.  

But......how long have you been gluten free?  I would suggest not eating bread for a while.  Given enough time, you forget what gluten bread tastes like.  

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Try gluten-free tortillas or corn tortillas. I'm not wild about any bread I've tried and frankly can't afford it anyways. My husband makes me a quesadilla and I'm happy :) 

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I absolutely love Three Bakers brand! All of their varieties are good. Ancient Grain is my favorite.

I guess it depends on what kind of bread you like--those are good toasted and for say, grilled cheese or sandwiches.

In my free pre-gluten-free life I use to like heavy hearty breads, Italian style right out of the oven. I have only gotten the feel of such bread 

at Le Pain Quotidien cafe and their gluten-free bakery breads. Nor sure where they have locations or can they be ordered on line. 

Lately I discovered O'Doughs --heavier style, lasts a while longer, too, bigger packaging. 

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Thank you all for taking the time to answer. I'm new following the gluten-free diet, and your suggestions are truly appreciated.

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10 hours ago, kareng said:

If I buy grocery store bread, I get Canyon Bakehouse 7 grain.  I usually get my bread from a local gluten-free bakery.  You might see if you have one near you

I have bought Canyon at Costco. 

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10 hours ago, gluten confused said:

Thank you all for taking the time to answer. I'm new following the gluten-free diet, and your suggestions are truly appreciated.

If your just starting after diagnosis, DO not eat the processed breads. You need to be on a whole foods only diet, no processed foods for at least a few weeks to a few months to boost your healing process. High starch gluten free processed foods will be like shooting yourself in the foot starting off, you have a high chance of crashing and making yourself quite miserable. If you must stick to lower carb fewer ingredient options, like gluten free corn tortillas, nut based breads, coconut wraps. I posted a some low carb gluten and dairy free Cheddar biscuit recipes and cheesy garlic bread ones on the baking/cooking section. Your goal should be getting in a varied diet of different nutrients simplified to be easy on the stomach and avoiding things that might cause bloat. Most people will hit a withdrawal stage getting off gluten, and it is quite miserable and more so if on processed foods. No need to worry you can snack on some the other options sometimes but try to do it in moderation for the first few months.

Here are some useful links if your just starting off.

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/

Forgive any assumptions on my part with this comment just thought I would cover this aspect if it is the case.

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I also like Canyon Gluten Free Bakehouse. Franz makes a good one too and it's easy to find. I live in a smaller town so the canyon bread isn't as easy to find. But I can buy Franz at Walmart. I like it a lot more than Udi's.

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11 hours ago, Dedegirl said:

In my free pre-gluten-free life I use to like heavy hearty breads, Italian style right out of the oven. I have only gotten the feel of such bread 

at Le Pain Quotidien cafe and their gluten-free bakery breads. Nor sure where they have locations or can they be ordered on line. 

Etalia makes a heavy artisan style bread.

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Here's what I tell people who have not been diagnosed long.......it is perfectly OK to eat gluten free bread after diagnosis IF it agrees with you and does not produce or aggravate existing symptoms.  The blanket statement that eating anything processed right away will slow down healing is just not true for everyone. Sorry, but it isn't.

As one of the skinny, classic Celiac's, I was 20 pounds underweight at diagnosis and if I ate only whole foods, i would have continued to wither away to nothing. If you need to gain weight or just need the emotional comfort of continuing to eat bread....a good, certified bread from a dedicated facility, eat it and do not worry that your healing will be impaired.  If it doesn't agree with you, then stop and try again in 5-6 months.

I had no gut left and was not absorbing much of anything but funny enough, I could tolerate gluten-free bread just fine. I healed on a steady, slow basis. Did not have any major setbacks, except when I noticed that dairy was bothering me.  Cut that out for awhile and things improved even more. I also added certified gluten-free oats in long before the year was up and never had the slightest problem from them. There are basic guidelines for Celiac Disease but everyone is different and you can amend the diet to your particular needs.  I just made sure that what I was buying came from a dedicated facility.

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17 minutes ago, Gemini said:

Here's what I tell people who have not been diagnosed long.......it is perfectly OK to eat gluten free bread after diagnosis IF it agrees with you and does not produce or aggravate existing symptoms.  The blanket statement that eating anything processed right away will slow down healing is just not true for everyone. Sorry, but it isn't.

As one of the skinny, classic Celiac's, I was 20 pounds underweight at diagnosis and if I ate only whole foods, i would have continued to wither away to nothing. If you need to gain weight or just need the emotional comfort of continuing to eat bread....a good, certified bread from a dedicated facility, eat it and do not worry that your healing will be impaired.  If it doesn't agree with you, then stop and try again in 5-6 months.

I had no gut left and was not absorbing much of anything but funny enough, I could tolerate gluten-free bread just fine. I healed on a steady, slow basis. Did not have any major setbacks, except when I noticed that dairy was bothering me.  Cut that out for awhile and things improved even more. I also added certified gluten-free oats in long before the year was up and never had the slightest problem from them. There are basic guidelines for Celiac Disease but everyone is different and you can amend the diet to your particular needs.  I just made sure that what I was buying came from a dedicated facility.

I agree with Gemini.  While it is always best to concentrate on good healthy foods, sometimes you need a cupcake! Breads -like Canyon makes-  are not unhealthy.  

You will probably not find a spongy, white, Wonder bread type of gluten-free bread.  The ones that taste the most like "real" bread are the whole grain types.  They are more like a "whole wheat" bread.
 

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  Thank you a lot! I think the reason I'm having such a hard time adjusting to the new diet is that I started buying gluten free products and the results have been discouraging. I'm still feeling bad and with little appetite.

  I have been trying to reproduce my old recipes by substituting old ingredients with their gluten-free counterpart. For example, if the recipe calls for bread crumbs, I use gluten- free crumbs, or if I need soy sauce, then I use gluten-free soy sauce instead. So far, the results have been disappointing and this is getting on my nerves. 
   If I understood your suggestions correctly, I should be using a different approach. Instead of trying to reproduce my old recipes, why not experiment with new ones that don't call for any ingredient that contains gluten.  What do you think about this? Has anyone experienced a similar frustration? Your commentaries will be really appreciated.

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1 hour ago, gluten confused said:

  Thank you a lot! I think the reason I'm having such a hard time adjusting to the new diet is that I started buying gluten free products and the results have been discouraging. I'm still feeling bad and with little appetite.

  I have been trying to reproduce my old recipes by substituting old ingredients with their gluten-free counterpart. For example, if the recipe calls for bread crumbs, I use gluten- free crumbs, or if I need soy sauce, then I use gluten-free soy sauce instead. So far, the results have been disappointing and this is getting on my nerves. 
   If I understood your suggestions correctly, I should be using a different approach. Instead of trying to reproduce my old recipes, why not experiment with new ones that don't call for any ingredient that contains gluten.  What do you think about this? Has anyone experienced a similar frustration? Your commentaries will be really appreciated.

 

1 hour ago, gluten confused said:

  Thank you a lot! I think the reason I'm having such a hard time adjusting to the new diet is that I started buying gluten free products and the results have been discouraging. I'm still feeling bad and with little appetite.

  I have been trying to reproduce my old recipes by substituting old ingredients with their gluten-free counterpart. For example, if the recipe calls for bread crumbs, I use gluten- free crumbs, or if I need soy sauce, then I use gluten-free soy sauce instead. So far, the results have been disappointing and this is getting on my nerves. 
   If I understood your suggestions correctly, I should be using a different approach. Instead of trying to reproduce my old recipes, why not experiment with new ones that don't call for any ingredient that contains gluten.  What do you think about this? Has anyone experienced a similar frustration? Your commentaries will be really appreciated.

I am just going to be blunt - you have decided that gluten-free isn't as yummy as gluten. gluten-free soy sauce in a dish is no different than regular soy sauce.  In fact, finer restaurants use the gluten-free tamari over the cheap soy stuff.  Bread crumbs on your tuna casserole are not any different.  Yes, bread is different, but that wasn't what you chose to cite.  

So... making stuff that is naturally gluten-free might be the thing to do for a while - until you can give gluten-free subs a fair try.  Steak, baked potato with sour cream, butter, cheese, asparagus - that's gluten-free.  It was gluten-free when you ate it 2 years ago and liked it.  I am making tacos for everyone - it's gluten free today .... it's always gluten-free.

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I have not found any bread that I buy at the store which I actually would call "good".  The only good bread that I have found is bread that I make myself, and Cuisanart has a bread making machine that really surprised me at how easy it is to use.  I like using Amys flour to make bread with.

 

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There are quite a few to choose from that we like but the one we like best right now..

Loaf: Northern Bakehouse

All other types of bread: Delicious Without Gluten<--- this is a recent discovery for us and wow, is it great. 

Both are Canadian Celiac Association certified

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We use Schar Artisan Baker Multigrain Bread in our house.  My kids say this one doesn't choke them, haha...  The ingredients are listed below for those that might have additional intolerances. 

Ingredients:

water , rice starch , sourdough (water, rice, flour) , corn starch , agave syrup , buckwheat flour , sunflower oil , soy protein , modified cellulose , psyllium seed husks (vegetable fiber) , flax seeds , guar gum , apple fiber , yeast , millet flour , sunflower seeds , apple juice concentrate , sugar , quinoa flour , salt , honey . Contains Soy .

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1 hour ago, BergieF said:

We use Schar Artisan Baker Multigrain Bread in our house.  My kids say this one doesn't choke them, haha...  The ingredients are listed below for those that might have additional intolerances. 

Ingredients:

water , rice starch , sourdough (water, rice, flour) , corn starch , agave syrup , buckwheat flour , sunflower oil , soy protein , modified cellulose , psyllium seed husks (vegetable fiber) , flax seeds , guar gum , apple fiber , yeast , millet flour , sunflower seeds , apple juice concentrate , sugar , quinoa flour , salt , honey . Contains Soy .

Oh my, I can identify with choking on lousy gluten-free bread! Poor kiddos!

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I make my Wife's gluten-free bread, cookies, bars, crackers, cakes and all her other bake good from scratch.

She is also on a FODMAP diet and natural sweetener free diet. So, I purchase my ingredients in bulk (50 lbs. bags), mix my own "blends" and bake them. She is also "sugar" free and natural sweetener free! I use a product called "Just Like Sugar" and Stevia to blend a sweetener for the various recipes. I started doing this because the food stores where charging way to much for a loaf of gluten-free bread. My present cost for a loaf of white gluten-free Bread is about $2.25 per loaf and it takes about two hours to make. ( most of the time is in the rising and baking)

I also make cookies, soda/saltine crackers, oat crackers, cheese crackers, angel food cake, pumpkin bars, etc. My biggest problem is that my recipes make to many for her to eat quickly so we end up freezing a lot.

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Store bought Julians Bakery is the only one that does not bother me, no yeast, corn, grains, only a few grams of carbs, I also bake all my own muffins, vegan cheesy breads, garlic knots, cookies, etc. and run a small gluten free bakery. I have posted many of them in the recipe section, MY NEW favorite has been a VERY versatile flat bread recipe which I have been eating daily. SUPER simple 10mins to make from start to finish and they freeze and reheat great, Been making them with different blends of seasoning and herbs in them and reheating them with vegan cheese or sauce toppings on them in the oven like slices of pizza or toasting them. I will give links to simple the search.
https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/118647-simple-flatbreadpizzapancake-base-grain-free/

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117818-grain-free-vegan-cheddar-biscuits/

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117322-vegan-cheesy-garlic-knots/

https://julianbakery.com/shop/?fwp_product_categories=bread

On the breads I suggest the Almond and the Coconut one, they are a bit moist dough when you get them in the center and need to be toasted, but this keeps them moist and non cardboard like other brands. The Almond one has a deep nutty flavor while the coconut is a tad sweeter with a bit off taste, they are great in recipes and for open top sandwiches. I love the almond toasted with avocado and egg. The coconut one I love putting nutiva butter flavored coconut oil on it and swerve sugar free sweetener and cinnamon for cinnamon toast or dipping it in egg whites, coconut cream, nutmeg, cinnamon, clove and maple extract blend for awesome french toast. The ingredients are so pure and plain I will list them so you can see. I love they are also low sodium..

 Almond Bread Purified Water, Almond Flour, Organic Coconut Flour, Egg Whites, Psyllium Seed Powder, Organic Lemon Juice, Potassium Bicarbonate, Sea Salt.  

Coconut Bread Purified Water, Organic Coconut Flour, Egg Whites, Psyllium Seed Powder, Organic Lemon Juice, Potassium Bi-Carbonate (Potassium), Salt.

Due to my other issues with carbs I have not tried their sweet breads and have yet to try the new seed bread, but others I have introduced to the Julian Bakery breads all have one thing in common, it is very easy on the stomach and no carby bloat.

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On 7/14/2017 at 0:10 AM, werlostinusa said:

I make my Wife's gluten-free bread, cookies, bars, crackers, cakes and all her other bake good from scratch.

She is also on a FODMAP diet and natural sweetener free diet. So, I purchase my ingredients in bulk (50 lbs. bags), mix my own "blends" and bake them. She is also "sugar" free and natural sweetener free! I use a product called "Just Like Sugar" and Stevia to blend a sweetener for the various recipes. I started doing this because the food stores where charging way to much for a loaf of gluten-free bread. My present cost for a loaf of white gluten-free Bread is about $2.25 per loaf and it takes about two hours to make. ( most of the time is in the rising and baking)

I also make cookies, soda/saltine crackers, oat crackers, cheese crackers, angel food cake, pumpkin bars, etc. My biggest problem is that my recipes make to many for her to eat quickly so we end up freezing a lot.

Recipes? Please?

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