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BarryC

Acid Reflux?!

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I was very surprised to discover that acid reflux could be a symptom of celiac. I have it and am taking Omneprazole. Just another digestive problem that I have and am actually happily surprised to find out it might be related to celiac. Hoping continuong with my gluten free diet will help. Going to go off the Omneprazole, and give some of the suggestions Poster Boy gave me a try. Anyone else also have acid reflux and did a gluten free diet help?

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I was first diagnosed with Gerd/acid reflux and was put on Pantoprazole for about 3 months, but the meds never really helped. Eventually I was diagnosed (by blood test) with Celiacs. After my endoscope I was on a gluten free diet for about a week and my GI dr told me I can completely stop the acid reflux meds.  Had no problems, minus just the normal recovery, but any acid reflux was very minor and improved with time. I will occasionally take a couple tums and that will help now.

I know exactly what you mean about feeling happy to find the acid reflux is related to celiacs. I wasn't getting better with the acid reflux diet (where I ate a lot of bread) and the meds. I was so happy to find out I can have coffee and the occasional pop AND start to feel better!!!  Hope this helps!

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I have acid reflux, eat gluten free but I still must take PPIs regularly. If I try to go off them I start getting heartburn within two days. The old esophageal sphincter just doesn't seal like it used to. There may have been nerve and muscle damage to the sphincter from all those years of heartburn. Plus, I have a hiatal hernia. I've got some naturopathic stuff ordered that is supposed to help with heartburn. We'll see.

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5 hours ago, trents said:

I have acid reflux, eat gluten free but I still must take PPIs regularly. If I try to go off them I start getting heartburn within two days. The old esophageal sphincter just doesn't seal like it used to. There may have been nerve and muscle damage to the sphincter from all those years of heartburn. Plus, I have a hiatal hernia. I've got some naturopathic stuff ordered that is supposed to help with heartburn. We'll see.

Hiatal hernia is definitely a risk factor for GERD, and the gastro who did my scopes said that more people than not after a certain age have hiatal hernias.

You're right that an "incompetent" lower esophageal sphincter is a primary etiological factor. And the factors affecting LES pressure include alcohol, certain drugs like anticholinergics, fatty foods, chocolate, nicotine, peppermint, tea, coffee. Other risk factors are obesity, as intraabdominal pressure is increased, cigarette and cigar smoking. So, obviously, avoid things that will decrease the pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter, including the above but also eat small frequent meals to avoid gastric distention, do not lie down 2-3 hours after eating, and don’t eat w/in 3 hours bedtime. People with GERD can sleep with the head of the bed elevated on 4-8” blocks to foster esophageal emptying.

This is from Medscape: "In the upright position, the major stimulus for transient LES relaxation is gastric distention after a meal. This accounts for the increased amount of physiologic reflux after eating, especially following the large evening meal. Thus, a reduction of meal size alone has the potential to be of benefit in the management of GERD. If this meal can be low in fat and high in protein, then this will further augment LES pressure and decrease the amount of acid reflux. Eating a large meal immediately before retiring should be discouraged, as this increases gastric volume, promoting gastroesophageal reflux with associated poor nocturnal acid clearance. I suggest to my patients that they can have a healthy evening meal, but eat or drink nothing but water for 3-4 hours before going to bed."

Plumbago

 

 

 

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Plumbago has good advice. Several years ago I purchased an articulating bed for back problems and the reflux seems to have benefited from it as well. 

I have difficulty with not eating for 3 hours before bed. I typically get terribly hungry right before bed and can't sleep if I get in the sack that way.

And I know losing about 30 lbs. wold help the GERD and other things as well. I often wonder if malabsorption of nutrients from Celiac disease increases our appetites. There seems to be a growing body of evidence that going gluten-free for many Celiacs doesn't arrest the SB inflammation as was previously assumed so that substantial recovery of the villi doesn't happen.

 

At one point I considered the GERD lap surgery but the potential side effects scared me enough I just concluded that since the PPI worked so well I would just stay with that. Though as we all know, ongoing PPI use has significant long term risks as well.

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Great advice thanks so much. I am hoping that as I continue to lose weight- intraabdominal pressure- it will improve. BTW I used to get up to pee three or more times a night. Since I have lost a bit of weight on a gluten free diet, I am down to one trip or less!  Or, is peeing at night (nocturia) another side effect of celiac?  Also, the constant dull pain in my stomach is lessening.  It suddenly showed up after way too many 'pop's, and since I am pop free, it has improved.  Was it gastritis or celiac related inflammation?  Just another of the multiple digestive issues I have that finally seem to be improving. Hopefully, I just have a more severe form of gluten intolerance, and my body can heal, even pushing 60!  For those of you with true celiac, my thoughts and prayers go out to you. Thanks again, Celiac.com-you rock!

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I'm not aware that nocturia is connected to gluten intolerance but they are finding more connections all the time.

I too suffered from nocturia but it was mostly related to enlarged prostrate which was fixed with a TURP. As we age most things get smaller but some keep growing.

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My trips at night were because of sleep apnea. With my cpap , I just get up once a night!

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This may not be super helpful, but according to Recognizing Celiac Disease: Signs, Symptoms, Associated Disorders & Complications by Libonati (RN, BSN), there is an increased prevalence of GERD in celiac disease patients, especially untreated, and that studies show improvement on a gluten-free diet. Gluten is something, they say, that increases abdominal pressure. It goes on to say, "celiac disease may represent a risk factor for the development of reflux esophagitis."

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I also have sleep apnea, have been on a CPAP for years.  The worst was when I had plantar faciitis and had to stumble around to get up and pee. You to get lots of muscle joint pronlems, but those have lessened.

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