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7 hours ago, Darlene F said:

I can eat buckwheat and rye

I am wondering what you are trying to say.  Are you going to share a recipe?  If so, please remember that people with Celiac disease cannot eat real rye bread.  They can eat buckwheat because it is not actually wheat.  

Edited by kareng
Stupid spell check

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I also need a gluten-free bread recipe, preferably one I can use with a bread machine. I was diagnosed 12 years ago and have gotten by with Udi's bread, but the only store in my town that carried it does not any more. The other brands I have tried just are pretty much awful.

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4 hours ago, mbrookes said:

I also need a gluten-free bread recipe, preferably one I can use with a bread machine. I was diagnosed 12 years ago and have gotten by with Udi's bread, but the only store in my town that carried it does not any more. The other brands I have tried just are pretty much awful.

I use a grain free bread from julians Bakery order online and they ship it, the seed loaf toast like normal bread bit dry, the coconut one is a bit overly moist falls part and is good toasted...and blood great for french toast. the almond bread form there is awesome toasted with avocado and egg on it. As for making your own, I have a flat bread recipe I posted in the recipe section, several cheese breads. I am currently working on a grain free coconut honey loaf bread, sort of a blender/food processor recipe that you then bake might post what I have so far soon and let others try it and see if it is just a me thing.

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Hi!  I noticed you live in Jackson, MS..me too.  I got a bread machine for Christmas this year that has a gluten-free setting, ordered some Manini's gluten-free flour, and followed this recipe and it worked out great!!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (105-110°)
  • 2 tsp. active dry yeast
  • 2 tsp. sugar
  • 2 eggs (room temperature)
  • 1 egg white (room temperature)
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 4 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil or grapeseed oil
  • 420 grams Manini's Multi-purpose gluten-free flour or Classic Peasant Bread Mix

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. In a glass measuring cup, warm 1 1/2 cups water until it reaches 105-110°. Add the yeast and sugar and stir to mix. Set aside until foamy, about 8-10 minutes.
  2. Use a fork or whisk to beat together the 2 eggs and 1 egg white, then add to baking pan of bread machine.
  3. Add apple cider vinegar and oil to baking pan.
  4. Add foamy yeast/water mixture to baking pan.
  5. Lastly, add the Manini's Multi-purpose gluten-free flour or Classic Peasant Bread Mix on top.
  6. Place baking pan in bread machine and set for gluten-free bread setting and start.
  7. After mixing cycles, and before rising cycle starts, use a spatula to stir in any remaining flour that might be stuck in any corners or the bread pan. You can also remove the mixing blade at this time so it won't be left in the baked bread.

by Michelle Palin ~ My Gluten-free Kitchen

RECIPE NOTES

Tips:
*Make sure your water is the proper temperature. Too cold, and your yeast won't be effective, too hot and it can kill your yeast.
*Make sure your yeast is good. If your yeast doesn't foam, using the method I listed, then you need new yeast. I keep my yeast in the refrigerator so that it lasts a long time.
*Use room temperature eggs. If they are cold, your bread will not rise as much.
*If your bread machine beeps after all mixing, before it starts rising, then at that beep, use a spatula to mix in any remaining flour and also pull out the blade from the baking pan so it won't be stuck in there during baking.
*I have not used a time delay cycle to make this bread, so I can't recommend that.
*When the bread is done, immediately remove and invert pan onto a cooling rack to remove the bread from the baking pan. Allow to cool completely before slicing or covering to store.
*Please note that results of home-baked bread can vary depending on humidity and on which bread machine you are using. You may need to make some adaptations for perfect results in your machine, but this should give you a good starting point.

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