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sddave

What's the deal with corn????

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I was extremely frustrated late last week and this week when I felt gluten.   I have been very careful to eat gluten-free.   A common ingredient I was eating was corn,  hard shell corn tortillas and a bag of gluten-free black bean chips with corn.  I checked the box of corn tortillas and it listed gluten-free and black bean chips had the gluten-free label.

Now I find out corn has a high % of a Prolamine protein (Zein) like wheat (Gliaden).  Has corn been linked damaging villi?

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21 minutes ago, sddave said:

I was extremely frustrated late last week and this week when I felt gluten.   I have been very careful to eat gluten-free.   A common ingredient I was eating was corn,  hard shell corn tortillas and a bag of gluten-free black bean chips with corn.  I checked the box of corn tortillas and it listed gluten-free and black bean chips had the gluten-free label.

Now I find out corn has a high % of a Prolamine protein (Zein) like wheat (Gliaden).  Has corn been linked damaging villa?

Corn has not been linked to causing Celiac damagethat I have seen.  Corn does seem to be hard to digest for most people.  

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Could be a intolerance or allergy, I know at least one or two other members developed a intolerance to anything corn related, I personally developed a really bad corn allergy about a year after diagnosis. Also a friends daughter has this odd issue when corn, when she eats it or something with it in it she flips out and goes crazy, like completely screaming, punching, and kicking everything ape s$#&.

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1 hour ago, Ennis_TX said:

Could be a intolerance or allergy, I know at least one or two other members developed a intolerance to anything corn related, I personally developed a really bad corn allergy about a year after diagnosis. Also a friends daughter has this odd issue when corn, when she eats it or something with it in it she flips out and goes crazy, like completely screaming, punching, and kicking everything ape s$#&.

Is there an allergy test for corn?

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Ssdave, 

Here's a study about corn causing reactions.  They conclude that corn could be responsible for continuing damage.  

"Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820067/

I had a problem with corn after I went gluten free, so I understand how frustrated you must be.  Corn is used in many gluten free bread and cookies, so be careful.

Hope this helps.

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1 hour ago, knitty kitty said:

Ssdave, 

Here's a study about corn causing reactions.  They conclude that corn could be responsible for continuing damage.  

"Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820067/

I had a problem with corn after I went gluten free, so I understand how frustrated you must be.  Corn is used in many gluten free bread and cookies, so be careful.

Hope this helps.

Wow.   Now I must also look for citric acid, confectioner's sugar, corn flour, corn fructose, corn meal, corn oil, corn syrup, dextrin and dextrose, fructose, lactic acid, malt, mono- and diglycerides, monosodium glutamate, sorbitol, and starch.

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16 minutes ago, sddave said:

Wow.   Now I must also look for citric acid, confectioner's sugar, corn flour, corn fructose, corn meal, corn oil, corn syrup, dextrin and dextrose, fructose, lactic acid, malt, mono- and diglycerides, monosodium glutamate, sorbitol, and starch.

Well this is a hit and miss kind of thing, citirc acid is sometimes safe, confectioners sugar almost always has corn starch in it to prevent clumping the exception is home made which you can use other starches as a anti clumping agent. the next few are duhs sto stay away form dextrin, dextrose, frutose, lactic acid....these are hit and miss as they can 1. be derived from things other then corn, and 2. They may be processed in a good facility that removes the protein that causes the triggers.  Malt should be avoiding for celiac reasons alone. the rest again fall into that maybe corn maybe something else and if refined/processed enough to remove the offending proteins, I find most erythritol sweeteners which are corn derived to be processed enough to remove the proteins that are offense...some off brands and in some products this is not the case. Swerve and Pyure for example I do not have a issue with. Some forms of maltotextrin bother me and will even trigger and allergic reactions in me with blood blisters, fever, vomiting and shitting blood. With corn in the American food industry it is really quite bad, I tend to stick to certain brands, avoid most processed foods, and find even then sometimes a brand changes a source for a batch or gets corn cc in a batch -_-.......hey at least you do not have a skin touch allergy to it lol, My claim to fame with a local health food store is making dis continue the use of corn starch biodegradable bags after I had a allergic reactions to it.

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2 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Ssdave, 

Here's a study about corn causing reactions.  They conclude that corn could be responsible for continuing damage.  

"Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820067/

I had a problem with corn after I went gluten free, so I understand how frustrated you must be.  Corn is used in many gluten free bread and cookies, so be careful.

Hope this helps.

Your issue with corn could be an intolerance, allergy or maybe even a cross contamination issue.  

The study you provided with just a "theory" and was not proven as stated by the Study's Conclusion:

"Maize is one of the most commonly consumed grains in the gluten-free diet. Despite the low content of zeins in maize-containing foods compared with that of gliadins in wheat-containing foods, maize could be responsible for persistent mucosal damage in a very limited subgroup of celiac disease patients. If our hypothesis is proven, zeins could be classified as harmful for some celiac disease patients, especially those showing a poor response to a gluten-free diet."

So, far nothing has been proven.  It was just a theory.   

The University of Chicago celiac website states that corn does not contain gluten.  People can have an intolerance or allergy to it.  

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/does-corn-contain-gluten/

Correct me if I am wrong.   I would hate for celiacs to give up corn necessarily.  

 

 

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4 hours ago, sddave said:

Is there an allergy test for corn?

Yes.  Consult with an allergist.  Keep in mind that testing for a corn allergy is complicated.  Often an allergist will recommend food elimination diet.  

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Cycling Lady,

I introduced the article by saying "they conclude corn COULD be..." as in "there's a possibility"...not a certainty.

"COULD" is in the title of the article.  

I apologize for that not being more clear.  

I know you don't feel well.  You poor thing.  You're worried about your reaction after your dental work.  I have very bad reactions to dental and general anesthesia because of the Sulfites used as preservatives in it.  I don't get the anaphylactic reaction.  I get Type IV Hypersensitivity Delayed reactions.  I get hives, diarrhea, vertigo, and congestion that feels like the flu, and carbuncles.  Takes months to recover.   Happens with medications that contain Sulfites like antibiotics and high sulfur foods, like garlic, wine, and corn.  Corn is processed using Sulfites.  

And we are back to corn... whether it's the maize prolamins or the Sulfites used in corn processing, I found it helpful to remove corn from my diet.

Apologies again for any misunderstandings.  

Hope you feel better.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I am corn intolerant as well. After my gluten challenge I was told to eliminate diet the top 8 known food allergens and  I had 8 additional foods that the clinic told me to food trial eliminate as well. 10 months after I'm still milk and corn intolerant along with my gluten. Ironically some of the other problem foods in my diary after investigation had contained  corn or corn derivatives that the elimination/food diary , calls, and research sussed out the corn culprit. 

For example the almond milks brands my local stores had contained corn fortified ingredients that were just labeled as the vitamin in the nutritional panel. I eliminated, rechallenged with the actual nut ( no reaction), tried another almond milk brand react, call manufacture ( you get the picture). I now make my own nut milks.

With corn not being considered a top 8 allergen it doesn't require  labeling. I long for it to be added to the required regulatory labeling list. With my health issues we overhauled the home of  My food issues and in that process our sons intolerance to my culprit foods manifested as well. He has many of my symptoms particularly my "youth" undiagnosed food issues symptoms. My symptoms became worse undiagnosed  with age . I now realize as an adult I have had these issues since  5 years old  if not before,as many here experience food intolerance etc. Was not something the medical community had on the radar -sigh.

As for confectioners sugar I found one cut with tapioca starch not  corn. Wholesome brand. Now baking powder I only found one corn free but it's often out of stock so I substitute that with baking soda and lemon in recipe or go the tartar substitute route.

And if any label change on a trusted  product brand  (as my turkey did this week) an email or phone call is made.

Good luck.

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On 8/4/2017 at 2:34 PM, sddave said:

I was extremely frustrated late last week and this week when I felt gluten.   I have been very careful to eat gluten-free.   A common ingredient I was eating was corn,  hard shell corn tortillas and a bag of gluten-free black bean chips with corn.  I checked the box of corn tortillas and it listed gluten-free and black bean chips had the gluten-free label.

Now I find out corn has a high % of a Prolamine protein (Zein) lixke wheat (Gliaden).  Has corn been linked damaging villi?

Have you tried other corn products?  I had a problem with a bag of beet/sweet potato chips. It wasn't the beets or the sweet potatoes.  It was the processing or harshness of the chips.

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Whitepaw, 

You MIGHT have had a problem with the beet/sweet potato chips because the beets and sweet potatoes are sprayed with sulfuric acid to stop the beets and sweet potatoes from turning brown or black before cooking.  Same with gluten free and regular potato chips, frozen French fries, hash browns, etc.  Sulfuric acid is also used to bleach some flours and some nut milks to keep them white. Shredded or flaked Coconut has Sulfites added to keep it white. Sulfites are added to crustaceans.  Sulfites are added to nuts and dried fruits as a preservative.  Spraying with sulfuric acid is considered part of processing and is not required to be listed as an ingredient.  

 

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7 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Whitepaw, 

You MIGHT have had a problem with the beet/sweet potato chips because the beets and sweet potatoes are sprayed with sulfuric acid to stop the beets and sweet potatoes from turning brown or black before cooking.  Same with gluten free and regular potato chips, frozen French fries, hash browns, etc.  Sulfuric acid is also used to bleach some flours and some nut milks to keep them white. Shredded or flaked Coconut has Sulfites added to keep it white. Sulfites are added to crustaceans.  Sulfites are added to nuts and dried fruits as a preservative.  Spraying with sulfuric acid is considered part of processing and is not required to be listed as an ingredient.  

 

Arrrgh !!!!    One more thing to watch for!    Thank you SOOO much, Knitty Kitty, for this info!   I knew it was something to do with the processing, but had not yet heard of this.    

I am still trying to stabilize after new dairy intolerance a few months ago.   I seem to keep getting exposed to something that exacerbates my symptoms, but I can't figure out what.  I've switched to almond milk, some organic soy milk, and some organic macadamia milk.   I just ordered organic cashews to try some cashew milk.   I don't think it's sulfites, but sulphuric acid treatment makes sense.    Is there a list of foods that are treated with this somewhere, or does your post pretty much sum it up?   

And not to hijack this thread, Sddave, this might be what's in your chips and tortillas???

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Here's a list of allowed sulfite used in foods.

http://www.ehso.com/ehshome/FoodAdd/foodadditivessulf.htm

Remember that if sulfurous or sulfuric acid is used in processing, it may not be on the ingredient list.  

Here's more information.

http://extoxnet.orst.edu/faqs/additive/sulf_tbl.htm

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy731

And, yes, Sulfites are used in processing corn into tortillas and corn chips.  

I found the low histamine diet to be very helpful.

https://www.histamineintolerance.org.uk/about/the-food-diary/the-food-list/

http://www.thepatientceliac.com/tag/mast-cell-activation-syndrome-and-celiac/

After reading about Mast cell Activation Syndrome, I began the low histamine diet and noticed improvement quickly.  

Hope this helps.

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Thanks!   After looking it over, I still think I'm ok with sulfites ... maybe not in a high concentration, or maybe not in certain forms.    I do wonder if it's the way that some chips and tortillas are treated.  i can usually tolerate tortillas and small amounts of potato chips, but not Terra chips and similar ones. 

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2 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Well, there's always this creepy explanation...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3945755/

 Glyphosate (Roundup) use and GMO's might have something to do with the increase in Celiac Disease... 

It's scary out there....

Speaking of which, here's a very long article dealing with roundup and celiac. http://sustainablepulse.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Glyphosate_II_Samsel-Seneff.pdf

Glyphosate_II_Samsel-Seneff.pdf

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LOL, it's like reading a horror story!  Thanks to both of you for the links.  This could explain a lot. 

I had read that Round Up is allowed in organic farming in the U.S.   As I read more, I see that organic farmers try to avoid using it ... but who knows if that's just a few or most of them.  

I had to give in and go on PPI's, as my upper GI bloating, acid tummy, upset stomach, and heartburn are still lingering and too severe from the early May dairy episode. I'll give it 2 weeks, then will probably see the GI Dr. if not better, rather than continue for the 2 months the PCP recommended.   When I finally get stabilized, I'm going to have to rethink everything I'm eating.     Might be time to say good bye to my beloved arsenic-filled rice and Round Up-filled everything, in addition to gluten and now dairy.  

And to keep this on topic ...  i sure hope I can still have some corn in some purer form. 

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Another scary study about PPI's:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28220520

And our discussion:

https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117685-atrophy-associated-with-ppis-nsaids-and-ssris/

 

What POSSIBLY could be happening:

http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/11/18/pellagra-and-the-four-ds/

Pellagra is a real thing.  I had it.  Doctors missed it.  Nearly died.  I won't take ppi's ever again!

Have you ever tried old fashioned baking soda and warm water to settle your tummy?

Don't wait to rethink your diet.  Your tummy is asking for help now.  Try the low histamine diet.  You could easily do this diet for the two weeks you've decided to take the ppi's.  

I had great success following the low histamine diet, which is basically a ketogenic diet.  Yeah, no carbs sounds scary, too.  No grains, no potatoes, no legumes (beans), no processed foods.    No dairy.  But it really gave my tummy and intestines a vacation.  And they thanked me for it.

Correct any nutritional deficiencies.  Talk to your doctor about checking Vitamin D, B12, folate, iron, and the others mentioned in the articles.  Makes a world of difference.  Your body can't repair itself without the proper nutritional building blocks.  

The changes in your diet require changes in thinking about how you view food.  Some folks even go through stages of grief.  Down the road, after you've healed for a while, you can add back arsenic rice and dairy once in a while.. 

Buy organic.  If you go to your local farmers market, you can ask the farmers themselves what they use on their produce.  And maybe buy some fresh corn on the cob! 

Hope this helps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Whitepaw said:

LOL, it's like reading a horror story!  Thanks to both of you for the links.  This could explain a lot. 

I had read that Round Up is allowed in organic farming in the U.S.   As I read more, I see that organic farmers try to avoid using it ... but who knows if that's just a few or most of them.  

I had to give in and go on PPI's, as my upper GI bloating, acid tummy, upset stomach, and heartburn are still lingering and too severe from the early May dairy episode. I'll give it 2 weeks, then will probably see the GI Dr. if not better, rather than continue for the 2 months the PCP recommended.   When I finally get stabilized, I'm going to have to rethink everything I'm eating.     Might be time to say good bye to my beloved arsenic-filled rice and Round Up-filled everything, in addition to gluten and now dairy.  

And to keep this on topic ...  i sure hope I can still have some corn in some purer form. 

Whitepaw,

I would just add a couple threads to this conversation.

This thread talks about some of the issues people have had on this board with stomach acid and what they found that helped them.  And it is a fairly current (this month) thread that might benefit you to read it.

And this older article first reported on celiac.com over three years ago that establishes a relationship between PPI's and a Celiac diagnosis.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/23432/1/Do-Proton-Pump-Inhibitors-Increase-Risk-of-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

In their summary they note quoting

"The data clearly show that patients who use anti-secretory medications (PPI's) are at much greater risk for developing celiac disease following the use of these medicines.

The fact that this connection persisted even after the team excluded prescriptions for anti-secretory medicines in the year preceding the celiac disease diagnosis suggests a causal relationship."

I hope this is helpful.

posterboy by the grace of God,

 

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4 hours ago, Jmg said:

No need for that. Go for basmati and prepare it like this to remove 80% of the problem :):

https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/how-cook-rice-remove-most-arsenic.html 

Goo d article, thanks jmg!

wish they would tell us how much arsenic on average is in a cup of typically cooked rice. And give guidelines on what is safe.... 

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3 hours ago, Victoria1234 said:

Goo d article, thanks jmg!

wish they would tell us how much arsenic on average is in a cup of typically cooked rice. And give guidelines on what is safe.... 

This is what the Beeb came up with:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice

Quote

For information on how much arsenic constitutes a low risk, we referred to the Food Standards Agency’s Committee on Toxicity in Food. Our calculations also assumed that the rice contained arsenic levels equivalent to the EU limits.

The resulting figures should in no way be considered as targeted daily amounts. They also do not take into account that additional arsenic could get into our bodies from other food and drink sources.

We have calculated that a constant daily intake of the following would currently be classed as being of low concern:-

Person weight Rice (uncooked) Rice cakes
Adults (70kg) About ½ cup (100g) Approx. 7 big rice cakes (70 g)
5 year old (20kg) 2 tbsp (30 g) About 2 big rice cakes 20g
1 year old (10kg) 2 tbsp (30g) of baby rice 20g of “baby” rice cakes; 10g if not labelled as specific for babies (1 big cake)

Reducing your risk

Fortunately, if you’re concerned about arsenic exposure, or you simply like eating rice, there are some simple steps you can take to reduce the arsenic levels. Michael Mosley teamed up with Prof Meharg to test some different rice cooking methods.

 

During the cooking process, the arsenic leaves the rice and enters the cooking water.

If, like many people, you cook your rice to dryness or use a rice cooker, the arsenic is simply absorbed back into the rice. However, if you use more water, so that it is not all reabsorbed, the arsenic remains in the liquid instead.

We found that when we used 5 times as much water as rice when cooking, only 43% of the arsenic remained in the rice. When we combined this method with soaking the rice overnight before cooking, only 18% of the arsenic remained in the rice.

Cooking advice

 

 

  1. Soak your rice overnight – this opens up the grain and allows the arsenic to escape
  2. Drain the rice and rinse thoroughly with fresh water
  3. For every part rice add five parts water and cook until the rice is tender – do not allow it to boil dry.
  4. Drain the rice and rinse again with hot water to get rid of the last of the cooking water.
  5. Serve your reduced-arsenic rice – it’s as simple as that!

% Arsenic from uncooked

p04s74fy.jpg

What does all this mean?

As with any food, rice should be eaten in moderation and as part of a balanced diet. For most of us our rice intake won’t be enough to cause concern, but for those who eat large quantities of rice and rice products every day there could be a health risk.

 

Babies and small children are particularly vulnerable so when buying for infants stick to specific baby products that are subject to stricter limits.

However, by cooking your rice using the Trust Me method you can remove about 80% of the arsenic in your rice, making it safe to eat more!

 I always washed rice anyway, just need to get better prepared and remember to pre soak! 

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3 hours ago, Jmg said:

This is what the Beeb came up with:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice

 I always washed rice anyway, just need to get better prepared and remember to pre soak! 

Thank you!

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