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icelandgirl

High cholesterol/statins

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I just want to say thank you so much to each of you that has responded...so helpful to have someone understand!  I love this board...so many wonderful people willing to help each other! ??

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48 minutes ago, cyclinglady said:

Researchers think that a decline in female hormones may impact your risk for  heart disease.  It basically puts us at the same risk as men.  Lipid levels are known to increase.  Your shortening periods may be due to natural decline in hormones.  If your symptoms are severe, you may consider Hormone Replacement Therapy.  Discuss this with your GYN.  But seriously, no worries.  All women  go through menopause.  So, you are not alone!  

I'm definitely not worried about it, but it is annoying!  My mom went through this for years!  Thanks for the encouragement ?

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17 minutes ago, knitty kitty said:

Yes, supplementing really helped my body get back to "normal" functioning... I had been terribly nutrient deficient prior to Celiac diagnosis, and the doctors just kept throwing more and more medicine at me to alleviate the deficiency symptoms and cascade of deficiency related health problems, but didn't try to discover the cause or the reason my body was "malfunctioning".  I've become disillusioned with the "take a pill" philosophy so prevalent now.  

You'll feel much better if you get your Vitamin D levels up over seventy.  There was a study done on people living on tropical islands where people get plenty of sunshine to make vitamin D.  They found the islanders' vitamin D levels were between 80 and 110.  Researchers are beginning to take a second look at RDA's (recommended daily allowances) of many vitamins and finding RDA's may be set too low.  

This study found:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10203369

"Large doses of vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of kidney stone formation in women."

I take evening primrose oil to help with those menopausal symptoms.  It's a source of more healthy fats.  And because vitamin D works as a hormone, you may feel better when your vitamin D level gets higher.  

Hope this helps.

Kitty

 

 

Thanks Kitty!  

How much vitamin D do you take?  I'm at 4000 ius a day.  I can tell an increase in energy since upping from 2000.  I'm getting my levels checked again in 2 weeks...I'm fairly sure that there will be an increase.

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1 hour ago, icelandgirl said:

Thanks Kitty!  

How much vitamin D do you take?  I'm at 4000 ius a day.  I can tell an increase in energy since upping from 2000.  I'm getting my levels checked again in 2 weeks...I'm fairly sure that there will be an increase.

I take at least 5000 IUs a day.  If I get a cold or glutened, I take double.  No, it won't hurt to take that much, but I'm not a doctor, I just researched a great deal.  

After finding me deficient, my doctor prescribed D2, the synthetic form of vitamin D, but I just didn't like it.  So, after some researching, I learned D3, cholecalciferol, is the natural form found in nature which is more bioavailable to the body.  I found a 2000 iu non-fishy supplement (because I was having allergic reactions to fish), and found I couldn't get enough.  I ate them like candy.  It felt really strange to crave a vitamin, I will admit, and it rather freaked me out, so I did more research.  I found that one's body needs to have a certain amount stored in body fat and the liver and other organs like the brain before the body can really get back to functioning properly.  My blood level was six at this point, so I decided to listen to my body and ate several vitamin D supplements at every meal.  I bought 10,000 iu capsules and tapered off over the following months as the voracious craving subsided.  My depression lifted, my skin cleared, I have more energy, I lost excess weight, my fatty liver is no longer fatty, no more cholesterol worries.  My last vitamin d level was 84.  

I had also started supplementing other vitamins and minerals, especially the B complex vitamins, several months after I started taking the vitamin D, so my overall health improved.  But I credit vitamin D with making the biggest difference.

Celiac disease causes malabsorption of fats. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are fat soluble vitamins.  If you're deficient in Vitamin D, you may also be deficient in other fat soluble vitamins.  It's a good idea to get them checked, too. I was also deficient in Vitamin A and experienced eye problems because of it.   And don't neglect the water soluble vitamins, the B's and vitamin C, and minerals.  Your body needs all of these nutrients to function properly.  I found so many health problems resolved for me with proper nutrition and supplementation when when warranted.  

Hope this helps.

K

 

 

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6 hours ago, plumbago said:

We are all different, true. But according to Dr Terry Wahls,

“When you look at chronic disease on a cellular and molecular level, we see it’s all the same disease – too much oxidative stress, inflammation, and nutrient deficiencies, toxins that are present. We see it in mental health, neurodegeneration, autoimmunity. It’s remarkably similar. Treat at the cellular level.”

She also says leaky gut happens largely because of our processed grain-based diets.

...and:

“Epigenetics is the science of understanding how the environment determines which genes are active or turned on and which are turned off. It’s thought to hold a lot of answers to why we develop chronic diseases like cancer and diseases of aging.”

(I read Taubes for the truth, Dr Wahls for understanding, and Michael Pollen to bring it all together!)

 

How true this is!  I always tell people that disease does not happen without inflammation and then I get the weird looks.  At the root of everything is inflammation and that is where people have to concentrate their effort on getting healthier........drive down the inflammation and that can happen by dietary change.

My cousin is a triathlete at the age of 61.  She does full Iron Man competitions and is one of the fittest people I know.  Her cholesterol?  Usually around 240 for a total.  She will not take statins but I doubt she will ever have plaque.  Everyone is so different in what a healthy cholesterol is for them but try telling that to most MD's.

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4 hours ago, icelandgirl said:

I just want to say thank you so much to each of you that has responded...so helpful to have someone understand!  I love this board...so many wonderful people willing to help each other! ??

Icelandgirl,

They (doctor's) will definitely bang you over the head with their big (pharma) stick  when they cann.

this movie can out before me but the movie title is appropriate.

"dr. strangelove or how i learned to stop worrying and love the bomb "cholesterol".

since I am a prediabetic (borderline) I tried their "pharma" solution of statins.

I immediately had memory problems in the first couple months of taking it (statins) and developed low level muscle pain (similar to fibromyaglia) that they obviously denied any connection too!

My fatty liver turned into prediabetes then diabetes before I stopped the  statins.

I have never looked back.

My links were about Vitamin K.  Until I found Vitamin K I struggled with cholesterol levels within in normal range.

They are  still higher than they want for a diabetic but are within normal range for the "healthy indvidiual"

which are (much) lower for diabetics . . . go figure.

but I Have learned to love cholesterol because I learned they/it is the basis for our hormones and 70% of free cholesterol is needed by the body to function properly and they (pharma/statins) turn off 100% of your body's ability to produce it.

And I would have to take expensive c0q10 if I was taking a statin (which it blocks for) and coq10 is important for a healthy heart.

Not to mention kidney issues' they (statins) can cause and oh by the way "statins are so safe" that you don't need routine blood montoring anymore???

If they could hurt your kidney's 10 years ago what's changed?

***** sorry for the rant but you need to know what you are getting into if they ( big pharma) is clubbing you over the head with you need "our safe statins" pitch.

My cholesterol went down with Vitamin K.  Niacin in high doses can help but be very aware the first week will include intense itching/hives unless you take it at night to minimize flushing.

I found the itching too intense and stopped the Niacin regimen before the itching/flushing could stop.

But if you titrate/step it up 100mg at a time any flushing you have will be minimal if taken with food.

everybody on this board has give you good advice.

Ratio's (HDL/LDL) are more important than the total number of either/each one.

but I wont' worry too much and learn to love your numbers! and don't let them (big pharma) worry you to death!   I find like knitty kitty find your true deficiency (vitamin d, e, k, a,) etc. is much more important!

posterboy by the grace of God,

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9 hours ago, Posterboy said:

Ratio's (HDL/LDL) are more important than the total number of either/each one.

The triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio is a good one to look for. According to Dr Wahls, it should be less than 3, and if greater than three, it may indicate insulin resistance. She notes that this ratio is less predictive in people of African descent.

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I found a calculator online that does the ratios and interprets them.  Mine were all ideal.   That's got to mean something!

Blood cholesterol

Total cholesterol 201mg/dL

HDL  69mg/dL

LDL 116mg/dL

Triglycerides 80mg/dL

Cholesterol ratios

Cholesterol/HDL ratio 2.913

Tryglicerides/HDL ratio 1.1594

LDL/HDL ratio 1.681

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7 hours ago, icelandgirl said:

I found a calculator online that does the ratios and interprets them.  Mine were all ideal.   That's got to mean something!

Blood cholesterol

Total cholesterol 201mg/dL

HDL  69mg/dL

LDL 116mg/dL

Triglycerides 80mg/dL

Cholesterol ratios

Cholesterol/HDL ratio 2.913

Tryglicerides/HDL ratio 1.1594

LDL/HDL ratio 1.681

Make sure you take these calculations to your appointment!  ;)

Funny enough.........your numbers are very close to mine, Icelandgirl!  My HDL is a little higher and my triglycerides are a little lower but the total is the exact same!  OMG.........does this mean I am dying of high cholesterol?????????    :o  :P

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14 hours ago, Gemini said:

Make sure you take these calculations to your appointment!  ;)

Funny enough.........your numbers are very close to mine, Icelandgirl!  My HDL is a little higher and my triglycerides are a little lower but the total is the exact same!  OMG.........does this mean I am dying of high cholesterol?????????    :o  :P

I will absolutely be taking these!

Having numbers close to yours makes me feel way better!  You are my celiac inspiration! ?

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2 hours ago, icelandgirl said:

I will absolutely be taking these!

Having numbers close to yours makes me feel way better!  You are my celiac inspiration! ?

Thank you, icelandgirl....you are sweet!  :)  I will be interested to hear what he has to say because, after all, our numbers are very similar!  My cholesterol numbers were always way too low and it took me 10 years of being gluten free before they went up to normal. I figured that was a good thing because it meant I am finally absorbing fats like a normal person without Celiac.  I hope this doctor doesn't rain on our parade.......<_<

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For anyone still following...an update...

It's been a week since I saw my Dr and it has taken this long to write, because I find it depressing. ?

So...my right carotid is clear, but the left has 20% buildup.  Both have normal blood flow.  My Dr now wants me to get my ldl below 70!  I stared at him and quickly said, "I don't want to go on a statin."  He stared back and said, "I didn't say anything about medication."  He handed me a sheet with 10 lifestyle changes and I go back in 6 weeks to see if I've managed to lower it over 40 points.

It's crazy right?  I'm not overweight, my BP is perfect, never smoked, eat healthy, exercise.

So, I'm working on it.  I replaced butter with a cholesterol helping margarine and my half n half with a coconut creamer and today have so far had non stop D!  

Pity party is over.  I'm just going to continue on trying and see what happens.

If anyone has any experience with this or words of wisdom, feel free to share. ?

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Hi Iceland girl-

I'm sorry this situation is so depressing right now!  Cholesterol is a complicated issue. Remember the reason doctors want to treat cholesterol is that high cholesterol has been associated with heart disease and strokes.  Of course, so have a lot of other things like genetics, weight, smoking, etc.  Because these are the #1 and 3 leading causes of death in the US, doctors want to reduce those numbers and delay a heart attack so that your quality of life is better.

I don't know if your doctor is using evidenced based medicine or not, but this is what the American College of Cardiologists recommends right now on how to decide who takes a statin.

http://tools.acc.org/ASCVD-Risk-Estimator-Plus/#!/calculate/estimate/

If your risk is >10%, take a statin. If it's less than 7.5%, don't take a statin. If it's 7.5-10%, think about statins.  There are some other things that can be considered. It's not a perfectly simple formula. For example, if your risk is really low, but all 3 of your brothers (for example) had heart attacks in their 40s, you might reconsider etc

Statins do reduce your chance of heart attacks and strokes really well. They are good medications. They do have side effects - like every medication. So, you only want to take a medication when the risks are outweighed by the benefits.  That's why the calculator is helpful.

Hope that helps.

 

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Hi Jen,

Thanks so much for your response!  Are you talking about the 10 year risk?  If so, mine was .4%.  So, that's good! I have no siblings and have no knowledge of my father or his family history as he took off before I turned 1.  My mom's family has high cholesterol, but not usually this early.  

Thanks again!

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Yeah drop butter and margarine, drop dairy also. Nutiva Makes a butter flavored coconut oil I use on my grain free toast, in baked goods, and sometimes to saute something.
I am actually in the process of doing various research and pulling a bunch of info on different nut and seeds in both whole and protein form. I am finding alot of them have a high reputation for lowering bad cholesterol and raising good. Same with many alternative protein source from vegan sources. I myself am supposedly genetically predisposed to bad cholesterol. I found in addition to all these foods I also supplement with pectin mixed up into a pudding that brought my numbers into check.
Do research on Whole Pumpkin Seeds, Whole Hemp Seeds (GERBS is the only gluten-free source), Sacha Inchi Seeds, Almonds, etc for regulating cholesterol.  Gerbs Allergen Friendly Foods has great selection of whole pumpkin seeds for snacking (whole with shell provides fiber), the hemp seeds from them, I have a recipe to make vegan parmasan out of them, you can even make great pesto with them great in salads. Look at using konjac noodles, and konjac rice in recipes the fiber and bulking abilities of the konjac root can help also, Miracle Noodles makes these.
 

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1 hour ago, Ennis_TX said:

Yeah drop butter and margarine, drop dairy also. Nutiva Makes a butter flavored coconut oil I use on my grain free toast, in baked goods, and sometimes to saute something.
I am actually in the process of doing various research and pulling a bunch of info on different nut and seeds in both whole and protein form. I am finding alot of them have a high reputation for lowering bad cholesterol and raising good. Same with many alternative protein source from vegan sources. I myself am supposedly genetically predisposed to bad cholesterol. I found in addition to all these foods I also supplement with pectin mixed up into a pudding that brought my numbers into check.
Do research on Whole Pumpkin Seeds, Whole Hemp Seeds (GERBS is the only gluten-free source), Sacha Inchi Seeds, Almonds, etc for regulating cholesterol.  Gerbs Allergen Friendly Foods has great selection of whole pumpkin seeds for snacking (whole with shell provides fiber), the hemp seeds from them, I have a recipe to make vegan parmasan out of them, you can even make great pesto with them great in salads. Look at using konjac noodles, and konjac rice in recipes the fiber and bulking abilities of the konjac root can help also, Miracle Noodles makes these.
 

Thanks so much Ennis!

A couple of struggles for me...I have calcium oxalate kidney stones and have to limit high oxalate foods, like nuts ?.  I have to try to get in dietary calcium to offset oxalates and that is hard without dairy.  Calcium supplements are a no as they cause kidney stones.

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2 hours ago, icelandgirl said:

Thanks so much Ennis!

A couple of struggles for me...I have calcium oxalate kidney stones and have to limit high oxalate foods, like nuts ?.  I have to try to get in dietary calcium to offset oxalates and that is hard without dairy.  Calcium supplements are a no as they cause kidney stones.

LUCKY, I knew I found something relevant for someone when I saw that info. Here is the entry on pumpkin seeds form that protein entry.

Pumpkin
Are rich in Magnesium, zinc, Iron, copper, b-vitamins along with the vitamins K and E. They are also a great source of various amino acids, and are alkaline forming so they help balance diets high in acidic foods and to maintain a balance of you bodies PH levels.
The Antioxidant levels in pumpkin seeds have also been shown to improve blood sugar regulation. Whole seeds have the added bonus of dietary fiber to lower insulin spikes, and promote regularity.
Pumpkin seeds and the powder from pumpkin seeds have relatively high amounts of the amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan is the amino acid the body uses to make the feel-good and relaxation neurotransmitter serotonin and niacin. 
Pumpkin seeds also contain high amounts of zinc, which can help the brain convert tryptophan into serotonin. Zinc is also a natural protector against osteoporosis.
According to various studies, pumpkin seed prevents calcium oxalate kidney stone formation, and reduced inflammation for arthritis without the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.
Pumpkin seeds contain phytosterols, compounds that that have been shown to reduce levels of LDL cholesterol
Pumpkin seed oil is rich in natural phytoestrogens and studies suggest it may lead to a significant increase in good "HDL" cholesterol along with decreases in blood pressure, hot flashes, headaches, joint pains and other menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women.
https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Seed-Protein-Powder-canisters/dp/B01LX9AOHF/ref=lp_8420532011_1_2_a_it?
https://www.luckyvitamin.com/p-2140214-jarrow-formulas-organic-pumpkin-seed-protein-16-oz
https://www.mygerbs.com/product-category/seeds/whole-pumpkin-seeds/

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On 9/3/2017 at 3:24 PM, icelandgirl said:

I just want to say thank you so much to each of you that has responded...so helpful to have someone understand!  I love this board...so many wonderful people willing to help each other! ??

Icelandgirl,

I think I mentioned this before but Vitamin K really helped my cholesterol.

I also had a friend who really swore by high dose Vitamin E but it didn't seem to help me.

Raw Almonds and Sesame seeds are a good source of Vitamin E.

Here is the Japanese research on Vitamin K.

People who took K2 had excellent results at 6 months.

http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/Pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=1998&issue=06000&article=00049&type=Fulltext

As if you are having trouble with Kidney stones you might try taking some Boron. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25110210

here is the algaecal site summary on some of the possible boron benefits.

https://www.algaecal.com/algaecal-ingredients/boron/boron-benefits/

And load up on Magnesium (3/day with meals) as Magnesium Citrate and/or Magnesium Glycinate preferably if cost is not an issue for you (glycinate can be more expensive) but doesn't have diarrhea issue Citrate can cause in higher doses.

Here is Dr. Wilson's summary of why when low in Magnesium then calcium overloads/calcifies our organs.

Note: he noted K (potassium) in this electrolyte balancing act.

a K deficiency (Potassium) can be corrected by taking Magnesium.

**** this is not medical advice but on one of the best articles (dr. Wilson) I have ever read on why being low in Magnesium creates so many problems.

dr. wilson's summary.

Summary: "Disorders of electrolyte homeostasis are known at many diseases and clinical situations. They have serious consequences for the cell. Mg-deficiency is followed by a K-deficiency, which cannot be equalized by K alone: a refractory hypokalemia always needs additional Mg supply for its restitution. From K, Mg-deficiency a Na/Ca-overload of the cell with aggravating consequences will follow: impaired activity and vitality with electric instability. Mg, which is responsible for development of a Ca-overload is also able to restore electrolyte homeostasis by sufficient supply competitively. The pathophysiologic relations for development of a cellular imbalance and its restitution concern the Na/K-pump, the Ca-pump and the Na/Ca-exchange. The clinical applications of Mg therefore are manifold: recovery under diuretic treatment, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, perioperative electrolyte therapy, transcellular shifts, coronary dilatation and so on."

I hope this is helpful.

posterboy,

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Having an LDL of 158 and total cholesterol of 241 my doctor insisted I had a coronary calcium ct scan to look for build up in the arteries.  When it showed I did have plaque he "demanded" (in a very loud and aggressive way) I go on statins, telling me if I don't I'm going to drop dead of a heart attack.  I had read Dr Stephen Sinatra's book "The Great Cholesterol Myth" before the appointment and wanted to discuss this with him but he refused, telling me that the info in there is biased, one sided, no medical backup to it, one person's opinion, dangerous, etc.  In the end I took the prescription for statins but have yet to take one.  My HDL and trigs and all ratios are excellent, it's just the LDL that is ruining it all.  My cholesterol has been  high for years and my doctor has never taken the time to discuss my diet, exercise, stress level or anything that may contribute to high cholesterol.  He says the only way to get it down is by statins.  (I'm not stupid though, I do know good food from bad food and based on what I eat my cholesterol shouldn't be so high, imo.)

Dr. Sinatra's book is a real eye opener.  He takes many studies and shows exactly why and where they are flawed with their biases towards statins.  He talks about the real reasons behind high cholesterol and why having cholesterol that is too low is dangerous.  His viewpoints  (similar to those of Dr. Mercola and many other functional/integrative physicians) are so opposite of what the mainstream doctors say.  Only in very rare circumstances does he think women should be on statins and men should be only when their risk of heart disease/attack is high enough.

But is he right?  There is so much controversy on this issue - butter is good, butter is bad; get your cholesterol under 100, that number doesn't matter; statins have lots of side effects, statins have few side effects; everyone should be on them, no one should be on them; take CoQ10, don't take CoQ10; meat is good; meat is bad; carbs are good, carbs are bad; canola oil is good, canola oil is bad; saturated fat is good, saturated fat is bad; coconut oil is the best thing since apple pie, coconut oil is as bad as any other fat so avoid it.  The only thing that they all agree on is that sugar is bad and most vegetables are good.

How does one ever know what to believe when there are so many different opinions?  How can two different groups look at the same study and come away with totally different conclusions? What good does listening to your doctor do when the doctor next door will look at the exact same lab results and hear the exact same story but recommend something totally different?

I do recommend Dr. Sinatra's book just to give a different side to the entire cholesterol debate.  It is very interesting and he does bring up a lot of good points.

Icelandgirl - I'm glad to hear your doctor is willing to work with you on ways to bring your cholesterol down without taking statins.  Your numbers aren't that bad, but like me you have the build up which puts a different light on it all.  Seeds and nuts are a great way to get needed nutrients, and they are tasty and filling as well.  Also pomegranate juice is supposed to be good at slowing down the plaque build up and in one study it was shown to reverse it.

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52 minutes ago, JaneWhoLovesRain said:

Having an LDL of 158 and total cholesterol of 241 my doctor insisted I had a coronary calcium ct scan to look for build up in the arteries.  When it showed I did have plaque he "demanded" (in a very loud and aggressive way) I go on statins, telling me if I don't I'm going to drop dead of a heart attack.  I had read Dr Stephen Sinatra's book "The Great Cholesterol Myth" before the appointment and wanted to discuss this with him but he refused, telling me that the info in there is biased, one sided, no medical backup to it, one person's opinion, dangerous, etc.  In the end I took the prescription for statins but have yet to take one.  My HDL and trigs and all ratios are excellent, it's just the LDL that is ruining it all.  My cholesterol has been  high for years and my doctor has never taken the time to discuss my diet, exercise, stress level or anything that may contribute to high cholesterol.  He says the only way to get it down is by statins.  (I'm not stupid though, I do know good food from bad food and based on what I eat my cholesterol shouldn't be so high, imo.)

Dr. Sinatra's book is a real eye opener.  He takes many studies and shows exactly why and where they are flawed with their biases towards statins.  He talks about the real reasons behind high cholesterol and why having cholesterol that is too low is dangerous.  His viewpoints  (similar to those of Dr. Mercola and many other functional/integrative physicians) are so opposite of what the mainstream doctors say.  Only in very rare circumstances does he think women should be on statins and men should be only when their risk of heart disease/attack is high enough.

But is he right?  There is so much controversy on this issue - butter is good, butter is bad; get your cholesterol under 100, that number doesn't matter; statins have lots of side effects, statins have few side effects; everyone should be on them, no one should be on them; take CoQ10, don't take CoQ10; meat is good; meat is bad; carbs are good, carbs are bad; canola oil is good, canola oil is bad; saturated fat is good, saturated fat is bad; coconut oil is the best thing since apple pie, coconut oil is as bad as any other fat so avoid it.  The only thing that they all agree on is that sugar is bad and most vegetables are good.

How does one ever know what to believe when there are so many different opinions?  How can two different groups look at the same study and come away with totally different conclusions? What good does listening to your doctor do when the doctor next door will look at the exact same lab results and hear the exact same story but recommend something totally different?

I do recommend Dr. Sinatra's book just to give a different side to the entire cholesterol debate.  It is very interesting and he does bring up a lot of good points.

Icelandgirl - I'm glad to hear your doctor is willing to work with you on ways to bring your cholesterol down without taking statins.  Your numbers aren't that bad, but like me you have the build up which puts a different light on it all.  Seeds and nuts are a great way to get needed nutrients, and they are tasty and filling as well.  Also pomegranate juice is supposed to be good at slowing down the plaque build up and in one study it was shown to reverse it.

Did he measure LDL particle density?  There are two types: hard/tiny and soft/fluffy.  What about your triglycerides? 

I have been reading about inflammation has a cause for heart disease and not cholesterol.  We have rejected statins for my hubby for this reason and the side effects from a statin just do not justify "supposed" benefits.  But that is based on our set of circumstances and yours may differ.  

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3 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

Did he measure LDL particle density?  There are two types: hard/tiny and soft/fluffy.  What about your triglycerides? 

I have been reading about inflammation has a cause for heart disease and not cholesterol.  We have rejected statins for my hubby for this reason and the side effects from a statin just do not justify "supposed" benefits.  But that is based on our set of circumstances and yours may differ.  

I asked about measuring the particle density but he didn't feel that was important.  He was so narrow and so focused on my high total cholesterol and getting me on statins that he wouldn't even discuss if there is possibly another reason why it is so high despite my excellent diet and daily walking.  Then he accused me of being narrow minded because I wanted to look at other causes.

Dr. Sinatra agrees with you about inflammation causing heart disease, not cholesterol.  He sees four causes, inflammation, oxidation, sugar and stress.  Cholesterol isn't a cause according to him.  He gives great evidence to back it up but other doctors also give great evidence as to cholesterol being the main culprit.  It's all so confusing.

My trigs are excellent at excellent at 52 and my HDL  is likewise good at 72.

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9 hours ago, JaneWhoLovesRain said:

Having an LDL of 158 and total cholesterol of 241 my doctor insisted I had a coronary calcium ct scan to look for build up in the arteries.  When it showed I did have plaque he "demanded" (in a very loud and aggressive way) I go on statins, telling me if I don't I'm going to drop dead of a heart attack.  I had read Dr Stephen Sinatra's book "The Great Cholesterol Myth" before the appointment and wanted to discuss this with him but he refused, telling me that the info in there is biased, one sided, no medical backup to it, one person's opinion, dangerous, etc.  In the end I took the prescription for statins but have yet to take one.  My HDL and trigs and all ratios are excellent, it's just the LDL that is ruining it all.  My cholesterol has been  high for years and my doctor has never taken the time to discuss my diet, exercise, stress level or anything that may contribute to high cholesterol.  He says the only way to get it down is by statins.  (I'm not stupid though, I do know good food from bad food and based on what I eat my cholesterol shouldn't be so high, imo.)

Dr. Sinatra's book is a real eye opener.  He takes many studies and shows exactly why and where they are flawed with their biases towards statins.  He talks about the real reasons behind high cholesterol and why having cholesterol that is too low is dangerous.  His viewpoints  (similar to those of Dr. Mercola and many other functional/integrative physicians) are so opposite of what the mainstream doctors say.  Only in very rare circumstances does he think women should be on statins and men should be only when their risk of heart disease/attack is high enough.

But is he right?  There is so much controversy on this issue - butter is good, butter is bad; get your cholesterol under 100, that number doesn't matter; statins have lots of side effects, statins have few side effects; everyone should be on them, no one should be on them; take CoQ10, don't take CoQ10; meat is good; meat is bad; carbs are good, carbs are bad; canola oil is good, canola oil is bad; saturated fat is good, saturated fat is bad; coconut oil is the best thing since apple pie, coconut oil is as bad as any other fat so avoid it.  The only thing that they all agree on is that sugar is bad and most vegetables are good.

How does one ever know what to believe when there are so many different opinions?  How can two different groups look at the same study and come away with totally different conclusions? What good does listening to your doctor do when the doctor next door will look at the exact same lab results and hear the exact same story but recommend something totally different?

I do recommend Dr. Sinatra's book just to give a different side to the entire cholesterol debate.  It is very interesting and he does bring up a lot of good points.

Icelandgirl - I'm glad to hear your doctor is willing to work with you on ways to bring your cholesterol down without taking statins.  Your numbers aren't that bad, but like me you have the build up which puts a different light on it all.  Seeds and nuts are a great way to get needed nutrients, and they are tasty and filling as well.  Also pomegranate juice is supposed to be good at slowing down the plaque build up and in one study it was shown to reverse it.

Janewholovesrain,

I agree it can be quite confusing sometimes.

They set the level so low that every "healthy person" it seems needs statin's these days.

It is worse if you are prediabetic or diabetic.

My cholesterol did not go too  normal levels for a healthy person until I took Vitamin K though I never here anybody talk about how it can help.

It might be the reason for the "French Paradox" of why they can eat fatty foods and still have low cholesterol.

Butter is an excellent Vitamin K source and we villify it in the western diet.

If you can't handle dairy in your diet try Ghee a dairy free form of Butter.

Low fat is not all it is cracked up to be.  Or else why does people who eat a ketogenic (fats and proteins)  diet have great cholesterol levels.

We need fat soluble vitamins i n our diet to keep us healthy.

****this is not medical advice but  I have learned to love fat in moderation.  Especially healthy fats.

posterboy,

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Icelandgirl, I think your doctor sounds reasonable.  Your body is showing a genuine cholesterol issue (carotid partial blockage) and he is recommending lifestyle changes before drugs.  I hope you can make a dietary adjustment that helps.

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On 9/2/2017 at 2:53 PM, icelandgirl said:

The LDL was 141 last year and 116 this yea

Mine is 142 and the doc says it's borderline high. 116 on the same chart reads near optimal. My doc would be happy if I had your numbers!

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