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Hi all,

Before I was diagnosed my cholesterol was always low and my Dr's were so impressed with me!  Now, the past 2 physicals it is high according to my Dr.  The LDL was 141 last year and 116 this year.  This year my Dr ordered an ultrasound of my carotid arteries after seeing the numbers.  Because I'm 45 and have high cholesterol he wants to look for buildup.  

I didn't think too much of it at the time, but I got a call yesterday to come in to discuss my results.  That means there is an issue.  If test results are normal they tell you over the phone.  If not, they make you come in.

I'm freaking out.  He already said that if there is buildup they want to get the LDL below 70 and I am pretty sure that involves a statin.  I don't want that at all.  I know that they can cause a variety of issues.

My appointment is at the end of the month...I'm looking for any experience that any other celiac has.  Thanks!  ?

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There are two kinds of LDL.  The hard BB-gun-type pellets that are thought to cause damage to the artery walls and the soft fluffy type that is considered harmless.  Find out the ratio of types you have.  Also, get the test results.    Do this before making a decision to go on a statin which may help with heart issues, but have some serious side effects.  

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I had really bad numbers for several years. Seems I am genetically predisposed to bad cholesterol, heck my numbers were bad even when I hardly ate ANY animal products. I starting making puddings, ice creams with Universal Pectin, This helped bring my numbers back in check. Funny how I live off good fats, almonds, nuts, seeds, do not eat meats or yolks, yet had those numbers.  Do some research on pectin and the effects on cholesterol.

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14 minutes ago, cyclinglady said:

There are two kinds of LDL.  The hard BB-gun-type pellets that are thought to cause damage to the artery walls and the soft fluffy type that is considered harmless.  Find out the ratio of types you have.  Also, get the test results.    Do this before making a decision to go on a statin which may help with heart issues, but have some serious side effects.  

Thanks CL!

I have just requested the Vertical Auto Profile (VAP) cholesterol test...hopefully that will come with good results.  I'm discouraged about this because I eat really well!

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11 minutes ago, Ennis_TX said:

I had really bad numbers for several years. Seems I am genetically predisposed to bad cholesterol, heck my numbers were bad even when I hardly ate ANY animal products. I starting making puddings, ice creams with Universal Pectin, This helped bring my numbers back in check. Funny how I live off good fats, almonds, nuts, seeds, do not eat meats or yolks, yet had those numbers.  Do some research on pectin and the effects on cholesterol.

I will look at it...thanks Ennis!

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Correcting vitamin and mineral deficiencies can be helpful in reducing high cholesterol.  

Vitamin B12 is needed for the body to utilize the cholesterol. Without sufficient B12 to break it down, the cholesterol accumulates.  Pyroxidine, folate and inositol are other B vitamins that help reduce cholesterol. 

Low vitamin D is associated with high cholesterol.  As is low magnesium, low zinc and low Omega 3 fatty acids (like in fish oil, flax seed oil, and olive oil).

Niacin, B 3, has been proven to work as well as statins for lowering cholesterol.  High doses of Niacin are used and should be done under a doctor's supervision.  

Supplementing Vitamin D and calcium, zinc and magnesium, and niacin and B complex vitamins and omega 3's helped me correct my cholesterol and triglyceride problems.  

These vitamins and minerals are often deficient in Celiacs due to malabsorption.  

Copy-cat gluten free foods are not required to be enriched with vitamins and minerals like regular gluten containing foods are.  So choosing fresh veggies and grass fed meats may be a better choice for getting plenty of nutrients. 

Hope this helps.

 

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1 hour ago, knitty kitty said:

Correcting vitamin and mineral deficiencies can be helpful in reducing high cholesterol.  

Vitamin B12 is needed for the body to utilize the cholesterol. Without sufficient B12 to break it down, the cholesterol accumulates.  Pyroxidine, folate and inositol are other B vitamins that help reduce cholesterol. 

Low vitamin D is associated with high cholesterol.  As is low magnesium, low zinc and low Omega 3 fatty acids (like in fish oil, flax seed oil, and olive oil).

Niacin, B 3, has been proven to work as well as statins for lowering cholesterol.  High doses of Niacin are used and should be done under a doctor's supervision.  

Supplementing Vitamin D and calcium, zinc and magnesium, and niacin and B complex vitamins and omega 3's helped me correct my cholesterol and triglyceride problems.  

These vitamins and minerals are often deficient in Celiacs due to malabsorption.  

Copy-cat gluten free foods are not required to be enriched with vitamins and minerals like regular gluten containing foods are.  So choosing fresh veggies and grass fed meats may be a better choice for getting plenty of nutrients. 

Hope this helps.

 

Thanks Kitty!

I really appreciate the perspective!

My B12 was in the 800s last check.  Zinc was good too.  D was deficient at diagnosis and has been very slowly moving up.  It was at 38.3 in July.  My Dr wants it over 40 and had me double my dose.  I do supplement with chelated magnesium for peripheral neuropathy.

I can't supplement with calcium unfortunately because I have calcium oxalate kidney stones.  I do eat salmon twice a week and some nuts.  I also use olive oil.

Was your cholesterol high after going gluten free?  Adding these supplements brought you back to normal levels?

Thanks so much!

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Icelandgirl,

Everybody has offered you good advice.

Niacin not niacinamide can help cholesterol levels.

Don't let them put you on statin's.  they have horrible side effects.

here is dr. mercola article about one of their many horrible side effects.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/06/03/statins-inhibit-vitamin-k2.aspx

I don't agree with everything he says but it is good to know that coq10 must be taken if taken statins.

Also look for something called pantehine complex (a form of B-5) not Pathothenic acid itself but pantethine complex.

http://www.lifeextension.com/Magazine/2010/3/Lower-Cholesterol-Safely/Page-01

I also highly recommend Vitamin K for cholesterol management.

I struggled with cholesterol for years until I found Vitamin K.

Now my ranges are normal.

unless you have a clotting disorder or take blood thinners it perfectly fine to take then be careful.

vitamin k has even been known to reverse the hardening on the arteries people taking statins are trying to reduce by taking statins.

see this summary on the roled vitamin K plays in hardening of the arteries when you are low in Vitamin K.

http://blog.healthybynaturehwc.com/can-calcification-be-reversed/

My blood sugar counts went down too while taking Vitamin K.

why I still can't eat refined things like chips and salsa or fried things but as long as I eat in moderation my blood sugars are now in normal range.

I recently had a small gluten free pizza and my counts were in the normal range.

I hope this is helpful.

****** this is in not medical advice but I found Vitamin K helped my cholesterol.

And I have found this is true in whatever deficiency I had at the time.

Magnesium Citrate helped fatigue, muscle cramps, gave restful dreams etc.

Vitamin D helped mood and memory etc.

I find once you find the right nutrient you will be surprised how much it helps!

Vitamin A helped halos around my eyes with poor night vision etc.

good luck on your continued journey.

posterboy by the grace of God,

 

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Iceland girl........your bad cholesterol has improved over last year and 116 isn't exactly panic mode! Not to mention that it has only been higher for the last 2 years and always Celiac low beforehand sooooooooo.........I think your doctor is a tad overboard on this.  ;)

I always had very low numbers, even up to 10 years post gluten free.  Then, I guess, I healed well enough that the last cholesterol check I had done 2 years ago, my total number was 200 and my LDL was 110.  However, my HDL was 82 and that was a rise of 25 points, which is great!  I do not worry about it and I know I am older than you. I have never had an ultrasound of anything and it wasn't even mentioned. You usually don't build plaque in 2 years. It happens over time. 

The cutoff for LDL used to be anything under 130 was good and they lowered it to anything under 100.  I swear they did that to pressure more people to go on statins. If yours was down to 116, I can't imagine what he is worried about.  They tend to focus on one number and it's the ratio that is more important, plus also density so don't get too worried, if you can.  116 is not bad at all! What was your HDL?  The higher that is, the more it offsets the bad.

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4 hours ago, Posterboy said:

Icelandgirl,

Everybody has offered you good advice.

Niacin not niacinamide can help cholesterol levels.

Don't let them put you on statin's.  they have horrible side effects.

here is dr. mercola article about one of their many horrible side effects.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/06/03/statins-inhibit-vitamin-k2.aspx

I don't agree with everything he says but it is good to know that coq10 must be taken if taken statins.

Also look for something called pantehine complex (a form of B-5) not Pathothenic acid itself but pantethine complex.

http://www.lifeextension.com/Magazine/2010/3/Lower-Cholesterol-Safely/Page-01

I also highly recommend Vitamin K for cholesterol management.

I struggled with cholesterol for years until I found Vitamin K.

Now my ranges are normal.

unless you have a clotting disorder or take blood thinners it perfectly fine to take then be careful.

vitamin k has even been known to reverse the hardening on the arteries people taking statins are trying to reduce by taking statins.

see this summary on the roled vitamin K plays in hardening of the arteries when you are low in Vitamin K.

http://blog.healthybynaturehwc.com/can-calcification-be-reversed/

My blood sugar counts went down too while taking Vitamin K.

why I still can't eat refined things like chips and salsa or fried things but as long as I eat in moderation my blood sugars are now in normal range.

I recently had a small gluten free pizza and my counts were in the normal range.

I hope this is helpful.

****** this is in not medical advice but I found Vitamin K helped my cholesterol.

And I have found this is true in whatever deficiency I had at the time.

Magnesium Citrate helped fatigue, muscle cramps, gave restful dreams etc.

Vitamin D helped mood and memory etc.

I find once you find the right nutrient you will be surprised how much it helps!

Vitamin A helped halos around my eyes with poor night vision etc.

good luck on your continued journey.

posterboy by the grace of God,

 

Thanks Posterboy,

I am interested in the idea of niacin...I guess it should be done with a Drs guidance.  I'm going to read through the links you've included.  Thanks again!

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50 minutes ago, Gemini said:

Iceland girl........your bad cholesterol has improved over last year and 116 isn't exactly panic mode! Not to mention that it has only been higher for the last 2 years and always Celiac low beforehand sooooooooo.........I think your doctor is a tad overboard on this.  ;)

I always had very low numbers, even up to 10 years post gluten free.  Then, I guess, I healed well enough that the last cholesterol check I had done 2 years ago, my total number was 200 and my LDL was 110.  However, my HDL was 82 and that was a rise of 25 points, which is great!  I do not worry about it and I know I am older than you. I have never had an ultrasound of anything and it wasn't even mentioned. You usually don't build plaque in 2 years. It happens over time. 

The cutoff for LDL used to be anything under 130 was good and they lowered it to anything under 100.  I swear they did that to pressure more people to go on statins. If yours was down to 116, I can't imagine what he is worried about.  They tend to focus on one number and it's the ratio that is more important, plus also density so don't get too worried, if you can.  116 is not bad at all! What was your HDL?  The higher that is, the more it offsets the bad.

Hi Gemini!

I agree that it's not bad and it is better than last year!  My HDL is 69 and the ratios are good.  I have such anxiety about Drs that I kind of freeze.  I should have just refused the ultrasound and brought up my ratios, but I froze.  Usually I'm just trying to get out of there as quickly as possible.

I also agree that the numbers were changed to get more people on statins... lots and lots of money in that.

I really appreciate your encouragement!

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I agree with others who’ve said that 116 seems a little low to be hitting the panic button. Still, I hope all goes well when you return to the doctor.

Gary Taubes is a journalist who for years has been shining a bright light on nutrition research, implicates sugar way more than fat in the diet, and in the article below questions the role of LDL as a marker of heart disease. There were so many parts I wanted to quote that I would have been taking up too much space. It breaks the different lipoproteins down well. I recommend reading it and at least thinking about it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/27/opinion/27taubes.html?mcubz=0

He does not dismiss statins out of hand as others here have done - “statin therapy can save lives" - but thinks that to the extent they do work, it's likely by means other than reducing LDL.

Plumbago

 

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1 hour ago, plumbago said:

I agree with others who’ve said that 116 seems a little low to be hitting the panic button. Still, I hope all goes well when you return to the doctor.

Gary Taubes is a journalist who for years has been shining a bright light on nutrition research, implicates sugar way more than fat in the diet, and in the article below questions the role of LDL as a marker of heart disease. There were so many parts I wanted to quote that I would have been taking up too much space. It breaks the different lipoproteins down well. I recommend reading it and at least thinking about it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/27/opinion/27taubes.html?mcubz=0

He does not dismiss statins out of hand as others here have done - “statin therapy can save lives" - but thinks that to the extent they do work, it's likely by means other than reducing LDL.

Plumbago

 

This is great information!  The dirty little secret is that it's the refined carbs and sugar that raise your chances of developing plaque and not animal fats.  I am in no way saying eat steak every night but when people go in for bypass surgery, the focus is on their blood sugar, not steak and butter.  Yet, do the mainstream panickers ever say that?  Not to my knowledge. If your blood sugar raises, then that is when plaque can form. When you spill a sugary drink on your floor and don't clean it up, stuff sticks to it, doesn't it?  Yes, a pretty basic comparison but you get the picture.  This is why diabetics are at such high risk for plaque.

Icelandgirl........I totally feel your pain on this as I have extreme doctor fear myself.  The way medicine has evolved, if that is what you want to call it, is all about meds and scaring people into compliance. One other thing I forgot to add is that if your thyroid numbers get too low, that can raise your cholesterol.......but I am sure you already know that.  As a fellow thyroid disease sufferer, something else to keep your eye on.  Hang in there, baby!  You are doing great at lowering the LDL and your HDL is pretty decent too!  If you can tolerate gluten-free oats, they work pretty well at lowering numbers.......fiber is what cleans out that bad cholesterol.  :)

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3 hours ago, plumbago said:

I agree with others who’ve said that 116 seems a little low to be hitting the panic button. Still, I hope all goes well when you return to the doctor.

Gary Taubes is a journalist who for years has been shining a bright light on nutrition research, implicates sugar way more than fat in the diet, and in the article below questions the role of LDL as a marker of heart disease. There were so many parts I wanted to quote that I would have been taking up too much space. It breaks the different lipoproteins down well. I recommend reading it and at least thinking about it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/27/opinion/27taubes.html?mcubz=0

He does not dismiss statins out of hand as others here have done - “statin therapy can save lives" - but thinks that to the extent they do work, it's likely by means other than reducing LDL.

Plumbago

 

Thanks Plumbago...really interesting article!  I thought the 116 ws pretry good.  My Dr did not.  I'm dreading this appointment!

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1 hour ago, Gemini said:

This is great information!  The dirty little secret is that it's the refined carbs and sugar that raise your chances of developing plaque and not animal fats.  I am in no way saying eat steak every night but when people go in for bypass surgery, the focus is on their blood sugar, not steak and butter.  Yet, do the mainstream panickers ever say that?  Not to my knowledge. If your blood sugar raises, then that is when plaque can form. When you spill a sugary drink on your floor and don't clean it up, stuff sticks to it, doesn't it?  Yes, a pretty basic comparison but you get the picture.  This is why diabetics are at such high risk for plaque.

Icelandgirl........I totally feel your pain on this as I have extreme doctor fear myself.  The way medicine has evolved, if that is what you want to call it, is all about meds and scaring people into compliance. One other thing I forgot to add is that if your thyroid numbers get too low, that can raise your cholesterol.......but I am sure you already know that.  As a fellow thyroid disease sufferer, something else to keep your eye on.  Hang in there, baby!  You are doing great at lowering the LDL and your HDL is pretty decent too!  If you can tolerate gluten-free oats, they work pretty well at lowering numbers.......fiber is what cleans out that bad cholesterol.  :)

Unfortunately I do have a sweet tooth...that may be what is causing the high LDL.  Ugh!  I just don't want to deal with this!  I wish I could eat oats, but my gut won't let me.  

My thyroid numbers were pretty good on my most recent check, but I'm getting tested again in a couple of weeks, so we will see.

Thanks again!

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36 minutes ago, icelandgirl said:

Unfortunately I do have a sweet tooth...that may be what is causing the high LDL.  Ugh!  I just don't want to deal with this!  I wish I could eat oats, but my gut won't let me.  

My thyroid numbers were pretty good on my most recent check, but I'm getting tested again in a couple of weeks, so we will see.

Thanks again!

I eat sweets every day every meal, I just use sugar free alternatives like stevia, monk fruit, and combine with a bit of a sugar alchol like xylitol, erythrol, etc. And make them with nut flours, nut butters, seeds instead of carby grains. This way I get to enjoy and treat myself with out causing my UC to flare up or throw a wrench in my keto diet.

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I think you need to wait for the LDL particle test results, along with the ultrasound results.  

For years, my doctors congratulated me on my low cholesterol (my total was always less than 120 and my HDL was around 30).  Little did I know, it was celiac disease that kept those numbers suppressed.  More importantly, I discovered through my research that low numbers were just as bad as high numbers.  

I changed my diet to a low carb high FAT diet four years ago, when my blood glucose results were high and my doctor told me to exercise more and cut out sugar.  What?  I probably exercise more than most in my age group (at least top 10%, if not more).  I was on a gluten free diet and addressing various food intolerances.  Give up my gluten-free homemade baked goods?  No way.  I needed more proof.  Luckily, there are glucose meters.  I researched, started tracking and yep, I have diabetes.  I was on my way to developing complications.  The good news is that I could control my destiny or at least slow it down.  Hence the LCHF diet on top of my gluten-free diet.  I showed my charts to my doctor and he agreed that my diet was working, but he could not endorse it.  Why?  Because the American Diabetic Association has stated that a LCHF diet is simply too hard to follow.  Better to give drugs than make people stop eating lots of carbs (usually the unhealthy carbs).  Now, after a few more studies, the ADA says this LCHF diet is an option.  For me, the proof is my meter.  I eat to my meter.  

So, is the LCHF diet for everyone?  No!  My research has indicated that everyone is different.  There is no "one-size-fits-all" diet.  

Going back to the lipid panel.   After being on a MODIFIED low carb, high fat diet diet, my numbers actually flipped.   My last LDL was taken in 2014.  I don't request an annual  lipid panel because when I fractured some vertebrae doing nothing two months after my celiac disease diagnosis, they thought I had a heart attack.  I was hospitalized and had a full cardio work up.  I had no build-up or blockage anywhere.  So, I figured I am good to go for another 50 years.   I have a much higher risk of developing more Autoimmune issues than a heart attack.  

I have read Gary Taubes works.  I believe he is on the right track.  Sugar (sweets/carbs) does seem to be the one food that has increased in terms of consumption by Western populations.  It probably is the key reason for our total health issues. 

 

 

Edited by cyclinglady

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We are all different, true. But according to Dr Terry Wahls,

“When you look at chronic disease on a cellular and molecular level, we see it’s all the same disease – too much oxidative stress, inflammation, and nutrient deficiencies, toxins that are present. We see it in mental health, neurodegeneration, autoimmunity. It’s remarkably similar. Treat at the cellular level.”

She also says leaky gut happens largely because of our processed grain-based diets.

...and:

“Epigenetics is the science of understanding how the environment determines which genes are active or turned on and which are turned off. It’s thought to hold a lot of answers to why we develop chronic diseases like cancer and diseases of aging.”

(I read Taubes for the truth, Dr Wahls for understanding, and Michael Pollen to bring it all together!)

 

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How frustrating to have to wait so long to see the doctor and get your ultrasound results.  My cholesterol has always been high (total 250 when I was 18) and got a little higher after going gluten free but that may be due to menopause at the same time.  Several ultrasounds have shown nice clear carotid arteries, and a CT scan showed no calcium in my coronary arteries, so I won't take a statin.  But if there was actually proof that my high cholesterol was hurting me I would not hesitate to try one.  They do help some people.

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3 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

I eat sweets every day every meal, I just use sugar free alternatives like stevia, monk fruit, and combine with a bit of a sugar alchol like xylitol, erythrol, etc. And make them with nut flours, nut butters, seeds instead of carby grains. This way I get to enjoy and treat myself with out causing my UC to flare up or throw a wrench in my keto diet.

Great ideas Ennis...unfortunately I can't do sugar alcohols.  They really bother my gut.  I do love baking with almond flour, but ended up in the ER with kidney stones last year and have to lower my oxalate intake.  Nuts are fairly high in oxalates.

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2 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

I think you need to wait for the LDL particle test results, along with the ultrasound results.  

For years, my doctors congratulated me on my low cholesterol (my total was always less than 120 and my HDL was around 30).  Little did I know, it was celiac disease that kept those numbers suppressed.  More importantly, I discovered through my research that low numbers were just as bad as high numbers.  

I changed my diet to a low carb high FAT diet four years ago, when my blood glucose results were high and my doctor told me to exercise more and cut out sugar.  What?  I probably exercise more than most in my age group (at least top 10%, if not more).  I was on a gluten free diet and addressing various food intolerances.  Give up my gluten-free homemade baked goods?  No way.  I needed more proof.  Luckily, there are glucose meters.  I researched, started tracking and yep, I have diabetes.  I was on my way to developing complications.  The good news is that I could control my destiny or at least slow it down.  Hence the LCHF diet on top of my gluten-free diet.  I showed my charts to my doctor and he agreed that my diet was working, but he could not endorse it.  Why?  Because the American Diabetic Association has stated that a LCHF diet is simply too hard to follow.  Better to give drugs than make people stop eating lots of carbs (usually the unhealthy carbs).  Now, after a few more studies, the ADA says this LCHF diet is an option.  For me, the proof is my meter.  I eat to my meter.  

So, is the LCHF diet for everyone?  No!  My research has indicated that everyone is different.  There is no "one-size-fits-all" diet.  

Going back to the lipid panel.   After being on a MODIFIED low carb, high fat diet diet, my numbers actually flipped.   My last LDL was taken in 2014.  I don't request an annual  lipid panel because when I fractured some vertebrae doing nothing two months after my celiac disease diagnosis, they thought I had a heart attack.  I was hospitalized and had a full cardio work up.  I had no build-up or blockage anywhere.  So, I figured I am good to go for another 50 years.   I have a much higher risk of developing more Autoimmune issues than a heart attack.  

I have read Gary Taubes works.  I believe he is on the right track.  Sugar (sweets/carbs) does seem to be the one food that has increased in terms of consumption by Western populations.  It probably is the key reason for our total health issues. 

 

 

It's funny isn't it how excited Drs get about abnormally low cholesterol?  My total was 150 and my Dr thought I was amazing!  The crazy thing is that I eat healthier now than I ever have.

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49 minutes ago, RMJ said:

How frustrating to have to wait so long to see the doctor and get your ultrasound results.  My cholesterol has always been high (total 250 when I was 18) and got a little higher after going gluten free but that may be due to menopause at the same time.  Several ultrasounds have shown nice clear carotid arteries, and a CT scan showed no calcium in my coronary arteries, so I won't take a statin.  But if there was actually proof that my high cholesterol was hurting me I would not hesitate to try one.  They do help some people.

I really do like my Dr, he's very nice, but he's one of the "Top Doctors" in our city, so it's always a wait.  I could see one of the other Drs there but with my Dr anxiety I think it's better to wait.

I am very interested in the menopause idea.  I am entering that time as well.  Unfortunately I recently started a period 17 days after the start of the previous one!  Ugh!  So, I now have an appointment with my gynecologist as well.  Does perimenopause, etc.  raise cholesterol?  Thanks for your input!

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Researchers think that a decline in female hormones may impact your risk for  heart disease.  It basically puts us at the same risk as men.  Lipid levels are known to increase.  Your shortening periods may be due to natural decline in hormones.  If your symptoms are severe, you may consider Hormone Replacement Therapy.  Discuss this with your GYN.  But seriously, no worries.  All women  go through menopause.  So, you are not alone!  

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21 hours ago, icelandgirl said:

Thanks Kitty!

I really appreciate the perspective!

My B12 was in the 800s last check.  Zinc was good too.  D was deficient at diagnosis and has been very slowly moving up.  It was at 38.3 in July.  My Dr wants it over 40 and had me double my dose.  I do supplement with chelated magnesium for peripheral neuropathy.

I can't supplement with calcium unfortunately because I have calcium oxalate kidney stones.  I do eat salmon twice a week and some nuts.  I also use olive oil.

Was your cholesterol high after going gluten free?  Adding these supplements brought you back to normal levels?

Thanks so much!

Yes, supplementing really helped my body get back to "normal" functioning... I had been terribly nutrient deficient prior to Celiac diagnosis, and the doctors just kept throwing more and more medicine at me to alleviate the deficiency symptoms and cascade of deficiency related health problems, but didn't try to discover the cause or the reason my body was "malfunctioning".  I've become disillusioned with the "take a pill" philosophy so prevalent now.  

You'll feel much better if you get your Vitamin D levels up over seventy.  There was a study done on people living on tropical islands where people get plenty of sunshine to make vitamin D.  They found the islanders' vitamin D levels were between 80 and 110.  Researchers are beginning to take a second look at RDA's (recommended daily allowances) of many vitamins and finding RDA's may be set too low.  

This study found:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10203369

"Large doses of vitamin B6 may reduce the risk of kidney stone formation in women."

I take evening primrose oil to help with those menopausal symptoms.  It's a source of more healthy fats.  And because vitamin D works as a hormone, you may feel better when your vitamin D level gets higher.  

Hope this helps.

Kitty

 

 

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  • Upcoming Events

    • March 20, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
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      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • March 24, 2019 Until March 27, 2019
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      NEW ORLEANS GOURMET GLUTEN-FREE mini GETAWAY    March 24 ~ 27, 2019   We have arranged a fun and Gluten-free food filled mini in the city known for it's food and fun.  We have arranged to eat many of the famous dishes that aren't usually Gluten-free at a few of the World Renown restaurants.   Staying at the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street in the center of the French Quarter, you'll be able to enjoy the ambiance of the city at all hours.   Our itinerary will include a Luxury Coach tour of the city and surrounding area - Admission to The National World War II Museum, including the Tom Hanks" 4D film "Beyond All Boundaries" - an exciting Airboat ride and tour through the Bayou.      This it the 3rd time we have visited New Orleans and it has always been well attended, so join us even if you've been there before.  Check out our website for the complete itinerary and cost.    Due to contractual obligations we must have 20 participants by October 31, 2018 to make this a go.      If you have any questions just give us a call at 410-939-3218.  Bob & Ruth info@bobandruths.com (410) 939-3218
    • March 30, 2019 Until March 31, 2019
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      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
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    Posterboy, thank you for passing along those links to that information about corn and celiac disease.  It makes total sense to me that corn could, in at least some rarer cases, aggravate the condition in the same way as oats, as corn (maize) is a grain, after all.  That is why I still am not sure about the teff that I had used a number of times, either --- not that I'm using any teff, or corn, or oats right now, as of a few days ago. And I did not know about the link between Xanthan Gum and
    Ah, thank you so much for clarifying that, Squirmingitch!  I had actually tried searching threads in this forum to figure out just what nightshade family veggies were doing to people with celiac disease, but the answer was not clear to me.  I'll rest a bit easier now when I eat my breakfast potatoes tomorrow morning. You know, I kind of like potatoes for breakfast!  I had them, peeled and boiled, with some olive oil, salt (non-iodized), freshly ground black pepper (my one spice concession o
Moleface, I have profound respect and sympathy for you in what you what through with the medical industry (yes, it is an industry). I had two different and unrelated health problems back in the 1970s and 1980s, for which I visited a number of different doctors and hospitals.  Ironically, the one that was gastrointestinal in nature, which I now strongly believe was celiac disease, went completely undiagnosed --- even after spending almost a week in the hospital being subjected to almost ever
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