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BedfordAudrey

NCGS and lower ANA levels in Autoimmunity testing

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I recently read a on a Celiac research site, that when a non Celiac gluten sensitive person is blood tested for evidence of an autoimmune disease, they will never test positive for that disease and therefore continue to go without a correct diagonises.  I am looking for a copy of that research document because I have to change my rheumatologist because he retired and I have met others who continue to live without the correct diagnoses all because we are gluten sensitive!  He headed the  Rhumatology department of a large teaching hospital and knew just by looking at me that I have Scleroderma and Raynaud's.  I went on to be seen for Sjogren's by a cornea specialist and there was a great debate as to whether I qualified because of my ANA test.  (I have the most severe dry eye with cornea damage, dry mouth and dry vagina and the DNA that indicates I could be a candidate for Sjogren's.). 

This would be an important find for the community of us that continue on our search for health.  I am 100% gluten free for 5 years; research gluten and its impact on our life; coach people that have gluten issues on how to build their life without gluten and embrace a new way to live;  my 21 year old grandson is gluten sensitive and has several autoimmune diseases and my sisters and cousins have both also.

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Hello and welcome :)

53 minutes ago, BedfordAudrey said:

I recently read a on a Celiac research site, that when a non Celiac gluten sensitive person is blood tested for evidence of an autoimmune disease, they will never test positive for that disease and therefore continue to go without a correct diagonises.   

I don't think I've seen the report you reference. Obviously NCGS patients won't test positive for celiac antibodies but I'd not seen anything saying that they would never test positive for other conditions (If I'm reading you correctly).

I tried to bring together the little that's known about NCGS here:

There's info there on a potential new blood marker that's been identified at Columbia, it could mean a test could be available some day. :) There's also a superb Q&A with Umberto Volta that I recommend. 

If it's any consolation, whilst individual medical practitioners may be doubtful and there's something of a backlash amongst mainstream health writers over the 'gluten fad' dieters, amongst the leading celiac researchers there appears to be little doubt about NCGS, just a recognition that as yet they don't have the understanding they need.

Kind Regards,

Matt

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This paper from 2015 suggests the opposite is true:

High Proportions of People With Nonceliac Wheat Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Disease or Antinuclear Antibodies.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/26026392/

Of course correlation does not equal causation, but it is compelling and something worth watching. 

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As the other's have stated, you most certainly can go on to have additional AI diseases whether or not you are Celiac or NCGS.  Many AI diseases can be figured out without mainstream testing, as you know from your severe symptoms of Sjogren's.  I also have Sjogren's and knew that I did without any doubt because of the severity of my symptoms.  I was later tested with a new PCP and yes, they confirmed what I already knew.  Have you had the blood work for Sjogren's?  Not that it matters because you already know. As Sjogren's really has no treatment other than treating the symptoms, having a confirmed diagnosis doesn't always matter.  Just see the doctors you need to see for the specific problems you have stemming from it and that's all you can really do.  So far, it has worked for me.

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