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Good morning everyone. So I have been gluten free for 4 months now. One thing I have realized is that I have an issue with yeast overgrowth which may be causing my gluten and dairy intolerance. I am wondering if anyone else experienced this and how they approached it. Also if you detoxed from yeast were you able to eat gluten and dairy again? I want to start a cleanse but I am not sure where to start. i am going to the doctor next week but thought it may be a good idea to be proactive. Thank you so much for all of your help!

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20 minutes ago, Hellosweetie said:

Good morning everyone. So I have been gluten free for 4 months now. One thing I have realized is that I have an issue with yeast overgrowth which may be causing my gluten and dairy intolerance. I am wondering if anyone else experienced this and how they approached it. Also if you detoxed from yeast were you able to eat gluten and dairy again? I want to start a cleanse but I am not sure where to start. i am going to the doctor next week but thought it may be a good idea to be proactive. Thank you so much for all of your help!

Welcome!  Most people on this forum either have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten intolerance.  That means they can NEVER consume gluten again.  A tiny exposure to gluten can trigger an autoimmune response that can last for weeks or months.  

If you suspect celiac disease (which is an autoimmune disorder like lupus), consider getting tested. It would require you to go back on gluten for 3 months as all celiac testing requires patients to be on a full gluten diet.  

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/

Systemic Candida is very RARE.  If you do have it, you should be under a doctor’s care.  

I wish you well.  

I did see your previous post.  You were diagnosed with celiac disease?   Your doctor should have told you that you can never have gluten again (consider a new doctor).    I think you should start researching celiac disease.  The link I provided is an excellent website that explains celiac disease.  

In any case, four months into the diet, is such a short a month of time.  It can take many months to YEARS to heal from celiac disease.  Why?  The learning curve for the gluten-free diet is steep.  Mistakes can be made.  You can have many set-backs.  

Ask your doctor for follow-up testing to see if your antibodies are coming down.

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/how-often-should-follow-up-testing-occur/

Edited by cyclinglady

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2 hours ago, Hellosweetie said:

Good morning everyone. So I have been gluten free for 4 months now. One thing I have realized is that I have an issue with yeast overgrowth which may be causing my gluten and dairy intolerance. I am wondering if anyone else experienced this and how they approached it. Also if you detoxed from yeast were you able to eat gluten and dairy again? I want to start a cleanse but I am not sure where to start. i am going to the doctor next week but thought it may be a good idea to be proactive. Thank you so much for all of your help!

Celiac/NCGS=gluten free for life, no if and or buts about it. Tiniest residue crumb and you body will ramp up antibodies for weeks and keep damaging you. As mentioned it can take years to heal. And easy to fall back with CC or cheating.
Dairy intolerance might go away, it is caused by the villi in your intestines being blunted and damaged, teh tips of them help with the enzymes to break down dairy, So damaged villi=less enzymes=lactose intolerance. Some celiacs can reintroduce dairy after some healing (6months-2years).
IF you also have candida, I dealt with my candida and got rid of it in 2 months. I took double barrel approach, I took CandidaFX to kill it off, and I went to a candida food diet. (I was already sugar free and low carb keto)  The candida diet starves the yeast off, I also started a probiotic as many of the good bacteria eat and keep the yeast in check.

Food List
https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/141325/file-699888490-pdf/resources/4410.pdf

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This is actually an interesting and complex topic. It it depends a bit on your diagnosis.  If you have celiac disease or NCGS, your body recognizes it for what it is and has the immune system response based on your diagnosis.  But also, when exposed to gluten, your body produces zonulin, the protein that regulates the tight junctions, allowing gluten and other proteins into your body resulting in an immune response to those foreign proteins. How exaggerated the response depends on genetics. 

It appears as if there are two ways that gluten can enter your body. Directly through the cells by a transferrin receptor and also through the zonulin/tight junction pathway. 

For those with celiac disease, the villi are destroyed and you cannot break down the milk proteins. But another likely cause of the intolerance stems from the intestinal permeability caused by gluten. Your body reacts to milk proteins because they are entering your body not fully digested and eliciting an immune response. Gut permeability is the culprit behind the multiple food intolerances commonly seen with autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.  

Another factor in all of this is gut dysbiosis.  Bacteria or yeast overgrowth is a suspected trigger for the immune response.  It’s one of the environmental components of the disease process and contributes to intestinal permeability. When you take care of the yeast overgrowth, it will reduce the intestinal permeability, probably allow you to consume dairy again, but if gluten is the issue, there is no stopping the response to the gluten since the protein itself triggers intestinal permeability and once the immune system is programmed to respond to the protein, there isn’t a turning it off.  

An interesting development is the discovery of molecules that block zonulin. The result is that gluten does not open the tight junctions and there is no immune response. So, since those with gluten intolerance always produce zonulin, you will always have this reaction. But someday there may be a drug on the market that could prevent it. Whether one would choose to take it or not is another issue. 

This is an interesting talk by celiac disease researcher Dr. Fasano on the topic:

https://cellsciencesystems.com/education/webinars/zonulin-intestinal-permeability-and-immune-mediated-disorders-facts-and-fantasies/

 

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