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Jane87

DH exacerbated by sweat?

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DH exacerbated by sweat? Any relation/connection there in your experienced opinions? If I flare up on my (as yet unidagnosed) lower back, it's hugely aggravated by exercise as I sweat on my lower back when I run so it makes it even itchier (100 times itchier)!! My youngest said it looks like "bubble wrap" on my lower back. Anyone else have experiences of DH (or other bumpy, red, itchy rashes) being irritated by sweat?

 

(For anyone that's not read my previous posts I'm due to attend a provisional Drs appointment tomorrow regarding long standing itchy bilateral rashes & I have a family history of Coeliac, Crohn's, Lupus etc.)

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Oh wow, I can't even imagine dh in a sweaty place! I used to scratch mine till bloody sometimes.  I super hope you get diagnosed quickly and are on your way to healing very soon.

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1 minute ago, Victoria1234 said:

Oh wow, I can't even imagine dh in a sweaty place! I used to scratch mine till bloody sometimes.  I super hope you get diagnosed quickly and are on your way to healing very soon.

Thanks Victoria. I never scratch my elbows  (just run my fingers around the outside as I feel v.uneasy about scratching the bumps, like sickened, so it stops me scratching and my elbows are the least itchy). However when it's on my lower back or both calves I scratch like crazy!!! 

Could it be the iodine in sweat? I'm wondering now as I've been told on here that iodine foods can aggravate DH when injested. 

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Hi there. I am not formally diagnosed with DH yet (that will happen in Jan or Feb), but my dermo and I are pretty sure that's what I have. I didn't want to be diagnosed in 2017 because I wasn't sure what was going to be happening with healthcare. I didn't want it as a preexisting condition.

Anyway, I exercise almost every day - hiking or cycling - and my sweat does seem to exacerbate the itch and bring new bumps up. Especially around my waistband area. I have been gluten free now for about two months, and the bumps and itching are less, but still there. I've started coating the area (and my behind) with Vaseline before I exercise, and that seems to help.

 

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42 minutes ago, Jane87 said:

Thanks Victoria. I never scratch my elbows  (just run my fingers around the outside as I feel v.uneasy about scratching the bumps, like sickened, so it stops me scratching and my elbows are the least itchy). However when it's on my lower back or both calves I scratch like crazy!!! 

Could it be the iodine in sweat? I'm wondering now as I've been told on here that iodine foods can aggravate DH when injested. 

You got me. Without googling I didn't know there was iodine in sweat. I figured it would be like salt in a cut for me, ouch! Or how sweat when it dries just makes you itchier. I have to wear a back brace and when it's hot out I get a rash that itches underneath, even with a tee in between. But nothing as itchy as dh.

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Is anything rubbing it clothing a seam etc? If you can alleviate that it may help some too. Although the location sounds most inconvenient.

My biggest issue was rubbing. The sweat seemed to help the clothing bond to me more excebaying the rub. I would have more form fitting workout gear I could wear without underwear. my bum would flare, waistband, and my elbows. The sweat in the bum area with the rub of the band seam on underwear made it worse. I switched to form fitting wicking type material with the seam running more on the sides to alleviate as much as possible. Rinse in shower asap. 

Also a call center phone job my elbows would constantly get rubbed by clothing on my elbow from constant rubbing of my blouse sleeves typing. I made sure I could roll them up.

if you can eliminate the adhesion sweat material rub it may help.

 

good luck

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Yes! Sweat, heat & humidity drove me crazy with aggravating the dh! DH likes to attack pressure points too. Like AWOL said, waistbands & such. I had to get boy shorts type underwear that were seamless ( I like all cotton). they still had a little seam on one side that ran for about 2". That 2" killed me so I figured out that if I wore them inside out, then the seam did not affect me. Forget a bra!!!!!!! NOPE, no way!!!!! Even now, when I wear jeans, the button part at the front makes dh flare, also where they wrinkle at the torso to leg area when you sit down --- I still get flares there. My dh liked to hit scars too. Old scars, new scars. 

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5 hours ago, squirmingitch said:

Yes! Sweat, heat & humidity drove me crazy with aggravating the dh! DH likes to attack pressure points too. Like AWOL said, waistbands & such. I had to get boy shorts type underwear that were seamless ( I like all cotton). they still had a little seam on one side that ran for about 2". That 2" killed me so I figured out that if I wore them inside out, then the seam did not affect me. Forget a bra!!!!!!! NOPE, no way!!!!! Even now, when I wear jeans, the button part at the front makes dh flare, also where they wrinkle at the torso to leg area when you sit down --- I still get flares there. My dh liked to hit scars too. Old scars, new scars. 

 

5 hours ago, squirmingitch said:

Yes! Sweat, heat & humidity drove me crazy with aggravating the dh! DH likes to attack pressure points too. Like AWOL said, waistbands & such. I had to get boy shorts type underwear that were seamless ( I like all cotton). they still had a little seam on one side that ran for about 2". That 2" killed me so I figured out that if I wore them inside out, then the seam did not affect me. Forget a bra!!!!!!! NOPE, no way!!!!! Even now, when I wear jeans, the button part at the front makes dh flare, also where they wrinkle at the torso to leg area when you sit down --- I still get flares there. My dh liked to hit scars too. Old scars, new scars. 

Reading back to all DH topics posted here, many references to how the DH rash appears and changes or “morphs” over time. I was affected on my hands, elbows, inside forearms/wrists, tops of thighs and the absolute worst, my bottom. I’m posting a few pics of my year and a half of this unknown Rash from He**...  maybe it will help someone else recognize the symptoms of DH... the pressure points, the symmetry of the rash outbreaks and the ever changing rash to full blown and very painful blood blisters. Any activity (even getting dressed) let alone sweating was just cruel.  I’m happy to say my primary care Dr finally correctly dx’ed me, ran the Gluten panel blood tests and confirmed the DH, Celiac Disease that was ruining my life and am now almost Rash free from a  gluten free diet and I chose to take 25 mg a day of Dapsone. 

49716749-47E3-4CFB-98C3-F848B559BE6F.jpeg

FB1275FC-F630-4D06-AFA8-53BE2A671EC9.jpeg

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17 minutes ago, Barbie Wickham said:

 

Reading back to all DH topics posted here, many references to how the DH rash appears and changes or “morphs” over time. I was affected on my hands, elbows, inside forearms/wrists, tops of thighs and the absolute worst, my bottom. I’m posting a few pics of my year and a half of this unknown Rash from He**...  maybe it will help someone else recognize the symptoms of DH... the pressure points, the symmetry of the rash outbreaks and the ever changing rash to full blown and very painful blood blisters. Any activity (even getting dressed) let alone sweating was just cruel.  I’m happy to say my primary care Dr finally correctly dx’ed me, ran the Gluten panel blood tests and confirmed the DH, Celiac Disease that was ruining my life and am now almost Rash free from a  gluten free diet and I chose to take 25 mg a day of Dapsone. 

 

6 hours ago, squirmingitch said:

Yes! Sweat, heat & humidity drove me crazy with aggravating the dh! DH likes to attack pressure points too. Like AWOL said, waistbands & such. I had to get boy shorts type underwear that were seamless ( I like all cotton). they still had a little seam on one side that ran for about 2". That 2" killed me so I figured out that if I wore them inside out, then the seam did not affect me. Forget a bra!!!!!!! NOPE, no way!!!!! Even now, when I wear jeans, the button part at the front makes dh flare, also where they wrinkle at the torso to leg area when you sit down --- I still get flares there. My dh liked to hit scars too. Old scars, new scars. 

 

FB1275FC-F630-4D06-AFA8-53BE2A671EC9.jpeg

I’ve tried to add a few more pics but am limited to 1.95 mgb - I will try again later to add a few more of my hands and bottom 

Edited by Barbie Wickham
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On 12/12/2017 at 4:35 PM, Awol cast iron stomach said:

Is anything rubbing it clothing a seam etc? If you can alleviate that it may help some too. Although the location sounds most inconvenient.

My biggest issue was rubbing. The sweat seemed to help the clothing bond to me more excebaying the rub. I would have more form fitting workout gear I could wear without underwear. my bum would flare, waistband, and my elbows. The sweat in the bum area with the rub of the band seam on underwear made it worse. I switched to form fitting wicking type material with the seam running more on the sides to alleviate as much as possible. Rinse in shower asap. 

Also a call center phone job my elbows would constantly get rubbed by clothing on my elbow from constant rubbing of my blouse sleeves typing. I made sure I could roll them up.

if you can eliminate the adhesion sweat material rub it may help.

 

good luck

Such a horrid rash, I ended up wearing my hubbys soft cotton boxers, also turned inside and waistband rolled over to prevent the raw rubbing. And yes, no way was a bra in my wardrobe! Good ol seamless cotton tanks, not the bra strap type, was the best I could handle! 

BF114D1F-3A72-4585-8382-89A0D49DDFDD.jpeg

Edited by Barbie Wickham

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On 12/12/2017 at 12:53 PM, Jane87 said:

DH exacerbated by sweat? Any relation/connection there in your experienced opinions? If I flare up on my (as yet unidagnosed) lower back, it's hugely aggravated by exercise as I sweat on my lower back when I run so it makes it even itchier (100 times itchier)!! My youngest said it looks like "bubble wrap" on my lower back. Anyone else have experiences of DH (or other bumpy, red, itchy rashes) being irritated by sweat?

 

(For anyone that's not read my previous posts I'm due to attend a provisional Drs appointment tomorrow regarding long standing itchy bilateral rashes & I have a family history of Coeliac, Crohn's, Lupus etc.)

Jane, oh I feel for you... I can’t imagine even trying to exercise at the height of my unyet dx’ed DH.... just getting dressed was a dreaded experience for me. The symmetry and bilateral rash and blisters were big clues to my Hero of our family  Dr. (not the dozens of specialists I saw!), along with rash on the pressure points of my body... hands, elbows, tops of thighs and the ultimate worst area, my bottom. I posted some pics prior to this, in reply to squirming itch and cast iron stomachs posts... I’m going to try to add a few more pics here, (site only allows a small upload for each reply). I hope your provisional Dr appt went well and your questions were answered. I’m 2 months into a gluten-free diet and a 25mg daily dose of Dapsone . Every time I try to stop the Dapsone I suffer a new breakout, so I’ll continue until my immune system gets stronger. I had my Thyroid gland surgically removed almost 40 yrs ago due to Hyper-Thyroidism and a very large goiter.  I then quickly went to Hypo-Thyroidism, (Graves Disease) and have since taken Synthroid daily.  I’ve read Thyroid problems are quite common amongst Celiacs and/or Celiac DH patients.  Best wishes to you of a correct diagnosis and  good health to you (and all of you reading this post) in the upcoming New Year! 

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On 12/12/2017 at 1:04 PM, Jane87 said:

Thanks Victoria. I never scratch my elbows  (just run my fingers around the outside as I feel v.uneasy about scratching the bumps, like sickened, so it stops me scratching and my elbows are the least itchy). However when it's on my lower back or both calves I scratch like crazy!!! 

Could it be the iodine in sweat? I'm wondering now as I've been told on here that iodine foods can aggravate DH when injested. 

Victoria- In reference to my previous replies to Jane, Squirming Itch & Cast Iron Tummy, I’m trying to upload a few more pics of my ever changing (& daily worsening of my DH rash). Site only allows small uploads...  I think the iodine is not just bad for the Celiac Disease but your Thyroid Gland as well, it’s not intended as medical advice, just a read observation from this wonderful forum. Best of all to you, wishing you all a healthier and therefore a Happier New Year in 2018! 

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On 12/12/2017 at 1:42 PM, ejk said:

Hi there. I am not formally diagnosed with DH yet (that will happen in Jan or Feb), but my dermo and I are pretty sure that's what I have. I didn't want to be diagnosed in 2017 because I wasn't sure what was going to be happening with healthcare. I didn't want it as a preexisting condition.

Anyway, I exercise almost every day - hiking or cycling - and my sweat does seem to exacerbate the itch and bring new bumps up. Especially around my waistband area. I have been gluten free now for about two months, and the bumps and itching are less, but still there. I've started coating the area (and my behind) with Vaseline before I exercise, and that seems to help.

 

You might want to give a try to Aquaphor,  (the jelly type, just like Vaseline) instead of the Vaseline. I had several Drs tell me it is much better for your skin than petroleum based Vaseline. I found it protected the rash and blisters really well, but I also felt like my skin was able to “breathe” easier than with the Vaseline... Best of luck to you with your upcoming diagnosis! 

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8 hours ago, Barbie Wickham said:

Jane, oh I feel for you... I can’t imagine even trying to exercise at the height of my unyet dx’ed DH.... just getting dressed was a dreaded experience for me. The symmetry and bilateral rash and blisters were big clues to my Hero of our family  Dr. (not the dozens of specialists I saw!), along with rash on the pressure points of my body... hands, elbows, tops of thighs and the ultimate worst area, my bottom. I posted some pics prior to this, in reply to squirming itch and cast iron stomachs posts... I’m going to try to add a few more pics here, (site only allows a small upload for each reply). I hope your provisional Dr appt went well and your questions were answered. I’m 2 months into a gluten-free diet and a 25mg daily dose of Dapsone . Every time I try to stop the Dapsone I suffer a new breakout, so I’ll continue until my immune system gets stronger. I had my Thyroid gland surgically removed almost 40 yrs ago due to Hyper-Thyroidism and a very large goiter.  I then quickly went to Hypo-Thyroidism, (Graves Disease) and have since taken Synthroid daily.  I’ve read Thyroid problems are quite common amongst Celiacs and/or Celiac DH patients.  Best wishes to you of a correct diagnosis and  good health to you (and all of you reading this post) in the upcoming New Year! 

Hi Barbie thanks for sharing your pictures and story! I'm glad gluten-free and dapsone have finally gotten you relief. How many years did you suffer with this?

I've just finished a flare up of this as yet undiagnosed rash so I've the Dr booked me in for bloods tests in the NewYear although Awol and others on this forum have told me that Coeliac blood tests are not always "positive" for DH. I'll upload my latest elbows pics etc below. 

PhotoGrid_1513447590111.jpg

PhotoGrid_1513447665189.jpg

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Those elbows look very familiar! I had that rash for a little over a year and a half, and with each break out, the blisters would change, worsen in appearance and the itch got insanely itchier.  The only topical product I found that helped a bit, was GoldBond lotion or liquid spray with Lidocaine.... Drs had me then just use Aquaphor (the Vaseline jelly type ointment) So, yes, I’ve read too that blood tests can have false negatives & positives.  However, my Dr ordered a complete blood work up and then added a special Gluten panel order... I gave  about 6 vials of blood for all tests. I was having so many vitamin deficiencies and off the charts inflammation levels throughout the year & 1/2... it all made such sense when we looked at all my symptoms & also the positive bloodwork. He told me I lit up not like a Christmas tree, but like the entire tree lot. It also made sense why all biopsies and cultures kept coming back as “unknown uticaria”       The specialists were taking samples incorrectly. What should have been a somewhat easy diagnosis turned into just a nightmare. All the misdiagnosis (scabies 3 Times, spider bites, excema, herpes and 3 Drs flat out just said I don’t know, try another Dr.) and the heavy medications prescribed (methatetrix, Otesla, shots of cortisone followed by 6 months of oral steroids, the anti fungals and the parasite pesticides!) I was a mess! All unnecessary and many were very harmful to my overall health. Since I’ve not had many stomach problems,  my Dr. & I decided to just go with the gluten-free diet and Dapsone and see how I responded. Incredibly within 2-3 weeks the Rash was gone from everywhere except for my very worst area, my bottom. I may have some intestinal testing done next year to be sure there’s no damage there. So between the  positive blood test and diet changes are working so well, I’m convinced I do indeed have DH. It’s also genetic and I have 2 first cousins with Celiac Disease. I’ve also learned from people here and the great information site provides, you must still be eating gluten for tests to be accurate. I can’t imagine eating the poisonous Gluten to further confirm DH, so I chose just to go with Diet and Dapsone. I hope you get proper results next month and on to a rash and itch free life!  Below is the picture my Dr found on his own time, on his “weekend” research... he was so excited he phoned me and had me come in first thing that following Monday morning. That picture looked exactly like me! I am his first case of DH in over his 30+ years of practice. 

141A0E3A-D276-49A5-9703-D7955338E2B3.jpeg

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57 minutes ago, Jane87 said:

PhotoGrid_1513447927388.jpg

PhotoGrid_1513447777778.jpg

Jane your fingers look exactly as mine did! So very painful, I remember feeling like I had broken a glass and shards were stuck in my fingers and hands.... 

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20 minutes ago, Barbie Wickham said:

Those elbows look very familiar! I had that rash for a little over a year and a half, and with each break out, the blisters would change, worsen in appearance and the itch got insanely itchier.  The only topical product I found that helped a bit, was GoldBond lotion or liquid spray with Lidocaine.... Drs had me then just use Aquaphor (the Vaseline jelly type ointment) So, yes, I’ve read too that blood tests can have false negatives & positives.  However, my Dr ordered a complete blood work up and then added a special Gluten panel order... I gave  about 6 vials of blood for all tests. I was having so many vitamin deficiencies and off the charts inflammation levels throughout the year & 1/2... it all made such sense when we looked at all my symptoms & also the positive bloodwork. He told me I lit up not like a Christmas tree, but like the entire tree lot. It also made sense why all biopsies and cultures kept coming back as “unknown uticaria”       The specialists were taking samples incorrectly. What should have been a somewhat easy diagnosis turned into just a nightmare. All the misdiagnosis (scabies 3 Times, spider bites, excema, herpes and 3 Drs flat out just said I don’t know, try another Dr.) and the heavy medications prescribed (methatetrix, Otesla, shots of cortisone followed by 6 months of oral steroids, the anti fungals and the parasite pesticides!) I was a mess! All unnecessary and many were very harmful to my overall health. Since I’ve not had many stomach problems,  my Dr. & I decided to just go with the gluten-free diet and Dapsone and see how I responded. Incredibly within 2-3 weeks the Rash was gone from everywhere except for my very worst area, my bottom. I may have some intestinal testing done next year to be sure there’s no damage there. So between the  positive blood test and diet changes are working so well, I’m convinced I do indeed have DH. It’s also genetic and I have 2 first cousins with Celiac Disease. I’ve also learned from people here and the great information site provides, you must still be eating gluten for tests to be accurate. I can’t imagine eating the poisonous Gluten to further confirm DH, so I chose just to go with Diet and Dapsone. I hope you get proper results next month and on to a rash and itch free life!  Below is the picture my Dr found on his own time, on his “weekend” research... he was so excited he phoned me and had me come in first thing that following Monday morning. That picture looked exactly like me! I am his first case of DH in over his 30+ years of practice. 

141A0E3A-D276-49A5-9703-D7955338E2B3.jpeg

Thank goodness you got a Dr in the end that recognised what was happening! I will have to see what my bloods show in January, I really hope they show coeliac, not because I want it but because I feel that's what this is! 

A fair few people yourself included Barbie have said my elbows remind them of theirs! The only thing I'm wondering is, mine never go bloody/open like yours and some other DH members on this forum. I can't stand the thought of scratching my elbows when they flare so I scratch around the bumps. With my back I can't help but scratch as the itch is wild and as it's a flat surface I feel less sickened by the thought of scratching my back and legs. 

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Jane, my rash didn’t go to the bloody,  pressure filled blisters until about a year in. They would get filled with so much fluid they would pop on their own, especially my bottom area and elbows. I hope for you you get a proper dx quickly as I found with each passing week my rash worsened and basically took on a life of its own! Of course, I was poisoning myself daily with Gluten, building up more and more deposits,  which just lead to more breakouts. And each breakout got steadily worse, leading to the bleeding and deep scabs that lasted for weeks. I wish you a speedy dx and a quick recovery next month. Do keep us posted on your progress. Happy Holidays. 

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My fingers went from little bumps to huge fluid filled itchy blisters that would pop, refill, pop again and then would finally scab over. Almost like a burn blister. Just an incredibly painful experience. I so hope you get a proper dx and you’ll be amazed how quickly you will begin to heal & feel better! 

A18DEDF3-5F75-4E7C-BF26-1F86DE78ABA1.jpeg

Edited by Barbie Wickham
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12 hours ago, Barbie Wickham said:

You might want to give a try to Aquaphor,  (the jelly type, just like Vaseline) instead of the Vaseline. I had several Drs tell me it is much better for your skin than petroleum based Vaseline. I found it protected the rash and blisters really well, but I also felt like my skin was able to “breathe” easier than with the Vaseline... Best of luck to you with your upcoming diagnosis! 

Thank you for the information. I will give Aquaphor a try!

 

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This is an entire thread with photos of dh.

This is a thread devoted entirely to things people have found helped alleviate their pain, itch, sting, burn of dh.

 

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    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.