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Lex_

Has anyone used Nima to test honey for gluten, by any chance?

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Since honey, raw or processed, may contain wheat dust due to the wide presence of wheat fields everywhere [possibly close to any bee hives anywhere], I was wondering if honey should be categorically categorised as a gluten containing food. Wondering if anyone who owns Nima has tested it?

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"Wheat dust" from fields isn't wheat flour. Wheat kernels in the field are very stable, and should not produce dust. I suppose if the bee hives were very near a flour mill there could be contamination. Please do post any test results, but I suspect that honey is nothing that celiacs need to worry about.

Actually another interesting test would be testing wheat germ oil for gluten (the oil may be gluten-free, but I've not seen tests on it).

 

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On 1/11/2018 at 7:29 PM, Lex_ said:

Since honey, raw or processed, may contain wheat dust due to the wide presence of wheat fields everywhere [possibly close to any bee hives anywhere], I was wondering if honey should be categorically categorised as a gluten containing food. Wondering if anyone who owns Nima has tested it?

What is wheat dust in a farm setting?  Dried stems?  How would fully formed seed get into honey?  Bees don't take seeds in.  Seeds don't " float" into bee hives. Please share your legitimate sources for this warning as I have not seen any?

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15 hours ago, kareng said:

What is wheat dust in a farm setting?  Dried stems?  How would fully formed seed get into honey?  Bees don't take seeds in.  Seeds don't " float" into bee hives. Please share your legitimate sources for this warning as I have not seen any?

Actually I read about this on other threads in this very same forum. The tag word was honey - whether or not honey can contain gluten. I did not notice any scientific reference, nor have I found any legitimate study on the matter. Then again, the overall amount of research on gluten and gluten related issues is limited, so I thought I would take the safe bet and ask if anyone has tested honey itself with Nima.

 

Sorry if my comment have come across as referring to any verified knowledge.

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18 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

Celiac.com has a fabulous resource....the search bar (tiny little magnifying glass).  Type in “honey” and you can look at previous posts concerning this topic!  

Thanks for the insight but I did already search the website with the 'honey' tag word before posting my question. Problem is that like most other topics, I found conflicting statements, so I thought I would take the safest bet and ask if someone has tested honey via Nima.

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Always remember what the doctors and scientists are trying to teach us about Celiac's disease. It's not gluten that's the problem, it's the toxic chemicals sprayed on the crops that cause Celiac's. Corn and rice gluten are safe for people with Celiac's because they aren't sprayed with round up before harvest. Oats do not contain any gluten yet they cause a celiac reaction because they are sprayed with round up before harvest. We are making giant leaps against Celiac's here in Wisconsin by attempting to ban the use of herbicides containing glyphosate.

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28 minutes ago, Kurasz said:

Oats do not contain any gluten yet they cause a celiac reaction because they are sprayed with round up before harvest.

Here in the UK at least the reason Oats are problematic for celiacs (well coeliacs here I guess) is that they're harvested, processed and packed on the same machinery as the wheat which they're grown alongside.  This proximity means its impossible to guarantee that some wheat won't sneak into the oats, unless you farm them separately, these are then sold as gluten free oats. 

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2 hours ago, Lex_ said:

Thanks for the insight but I did already search the website with the 'honey' tag word before posting my question. Problem is that like most other topics, I found conflicting statements, so I thought I would take the safest bet and ask if someone has tested honey via Nima.

Great!  I was not sure just how many people know about the search function.  

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3 hours ago, Kurasz said:

Always remember what the doctors and scientists are trying to teach us about Celiac's disease. It's not gluten that's the problem

Celiac disease was a problem long before Round Up. My son was biopsy diagnosed in 1976. That is Big Wheat spending millions in order to divert attention. Here is a question. Why is it, when they hold congressional discussions on Genetic Modifications in Food, Wheat is specifically excluded from all discussion? Why is Wheat still government subsidized?

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4 hours ago, Kurasz said:

Always remember what the doctors and scientists are trying to teach us about Celiac's disease. It's not gluten that's the problem, it's the toxic chemicals sprayed on the crops that cause Celiac's. Corn and rice gluten are safe for people with Celiac's because they aren't sprayed with round up before harvest. Oats do not contain any gluten yet they cause a celiac reaction because they are sprayed with round up before harvest. We are making giant leaps against Celiac's here in Wisconsin by attempting to ban the use of herbicides containing glyphosate.

 

57 minutes ago, Wheatwacked said:

Celiac disease was a problem long before Round Up. My son was biopsy diagnosed in 1976. That is Big Wheat spending millions in order to divert attention. Here is a question. Why is it, when they hold congressional discussions on Genetic Modifications in Food, Wheat is specifically excluded from all discussion? Why is Wheat still government subsidized?

If you want to have this discussion, please make your own topic.  Political/ conspiracy theories, roundup, your theories on the cause of Celiac do not belong on this lady’s question about honey

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Hi lex,

I haven't tested anything with NIMA myself, since I don't have one.  

I did find some honey sites that claim they have gluten-free honey.  This is just a couple I found in a quick search.  It seems to me honey is made from nectar of flowers.  The nectar is a precursor to the seed.  So the seed isn't formed until the flower is fertilized.  Then gluten is formed as the seed matures.  So normally I think there is little chance of honey having gluten in it because the nectar and gluten are not present at the same time in the plants.

I don't think it's impossible for honey to somehow get some gluten in it.  Honey from china has been adulterated with other things already.  Generally high fructose corn syrup.  But who know what else they put in it?

I think's its safer to buy local honey where you know the farmer than imported brands IMHO.

If there were a large flour mill in the area where the honey was being harvested I'd be a little wary of it myself.  At least for honey produced during the harvest season.

http://www.barkmanhoney.com/faqs/does-honey-contain-gluten/

http://www.capilanohoney.com/au-en/faq/is-your-honey-gluten-free

Is your honey gluten free?

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Honey is naturally free of gluten. It does not contain wheat or its by-products. Our honey is 100% pure and natural, nothing has been added to it, therefore it is 100% gluten free. In addition to this, no gluten containing products are handled or stored in our packing facilities.

 

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On 1/13/2018 at 6:35 PM, kareng said:

 

If you want to have this discussion, please make your own topic.  Political/ conspiracy theories, roundup, your theories on the cause of Celiac do not belong on this lady’s question about honey

That's because they were using DDT before round up which also contained glyphosate, which has been proven to cause Celiac's and many other diseases

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Just now, Kurasz said:

That's because they were using DDT before round up which also contained glyphosate, which has been proven to cause Celiac's and many other diseases

This is still not the place for your politcal feelings.  this is not relevaent to the topic.

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5 hours ago, GFinDC said:

Hi lex,

I haven't tested anything with NIMA myself, since I don't have one.  

I did find some honey sites that claim they have gluten-free honey.  This is just a couple I found in a quick search.  It seems to me honey is made from nectar of flowers.  The nectar is a precursor to the seed.  So the seed isn't formed until the flower is fertilized.  Then gluten is formed as the seed matures.  So normally I think there is little chance of honey having gluten in it because the nectar and gluten are not present at the same time in the plants.

I don't think it's impossible for honey to somehow get some gluten in it.  Honey from china has been adulterated with other things already.  Generally high fructose corn syrup.  But who know what else they put in it?

I think's its safer to buy local honey where you know the farmer than imported brands IMHO.

If there were a large flour mill in the area where the honey was being harvested I'd be a little wary of it myself.  At least for honey produced during the harvest season.

http://www.barkmanhoney.com/faqs/does-honey-contain-gluten/

http://www.capilanohoney.com/au-en/faq/is-your-honey-gluten-free

Is your honey gluten free?

  •  
  •  
  •  

Honey is naturally free of gluten. It does not contain wheat or its by-products. Our honey is 100% pure and natural, nothing has been added to it, therefore it is 100% gluten free. In addition to this, no gluten containing products are handled or stored in our packing facilities.

 

Thank you for your response, GFinDC. I agree that buying from a local producer is a safe bet.

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My husband & I used to be beekeepers. It would be almost impossible for wheat protein to get into honey. The honey is inside the hive; it's not like it's laying out in the open in a plate or a bowl. Here's a hive.: https://www.mannlakeltd.com/10-frame-traditional-growing-apiary-kit-wood-frames-painted?gclid=CjwKCAiA4vbSBRBNEiwAMorER1htsezzCA5djegusWEGx_DzRHG4xePYQIxxd1paGZy4ibxMR_dSFxoCFUoQAvD_BwE

The bees have a narrow opening at the bottom of the hive where they enter & exit & when they enter then they climb upward inside the hive. The bottom section is the brood chamber where the queen lays eggs & eventually become bees. At the top of that section is something called a queen excluder which is generally a metal screen type thing with holes in it. The queen is larger than the workers so the holes are smaller than the queen in order to keep her in the brood chamber. This is so she doesn't go laying eggs all over the hive. The workers fit through the excluder allowing them to go to the supers (boxes) above where the nectar is deposited in honeycomb & turned into honey & when a cell is full, they cap it off. You've seen honeycomb before. So when harvest time comes, the beekeeper takes the full (of honey) supers off the brood chamber & replaces them with empty (of honey) supers so the bees can start filling those up. The full supers get taken to what we call the honey house which is where extraction takes place. Here's a YouTube video of honey extraction. As you can see, this is not anywhere that other food is being made or prepared. Other food does not get done in honey production. It's a class all it's own. There's not going to be any wheat barley or rye there. 

 

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