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    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

stretch123

Has anyone tried a SF, gluten-free, DF diet?

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2 hours ago, stretch123 said:

I am currently trying a 3 week elimination diet.  Sugar Free, Gluten Free and Dairy Free.  I am feeling very lightheaded.  Has this happened to anyone else?

Any radical change in your diet could cause problems (e.g. not eating enough).  Why are you on this diet?  

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Hi Calvin,

You probably won't get a response from the OP (original poster) since they aren't following this thread.  So they won't know you asked a a question unless they happen to login and see your post.

But, I can give you an idea on the diet.  A sugar-free, dairy-free, and gluten-free diet would not include any wheat, rye or barley.  Ideally it would not have any oats either.  The other things that would be eliminated are any dairy products including any processed foods containing casein or whey or lactose.  Also any fruits would be left out since they contain fructose (a form of sugar).

You'd be left with a healthy diet of nuts, meats, veggies, and eggs.

Often you will see an acronym of GFCFSF diet.  This GFCFSF diet usually means a gluten-free, casein-free and soy-free diet.  Notice the SF means soy-free not sugar-free.  So it can be confusing to read older threads with this acronym if the initials have different meanings.  Just FYI.

A similar diet idea is a whole foods diet.  For a whole foods diet you don't eat any processed foods.  That means no bread, cookies, cereal, ice cream, candy etc because all those things are processed.

When people have celiac disease their guts are often inflamed and irritated.  That ongoing irritation can lead to people developing intolerances to foods.  For instance I can't eat dairy, soy, nightshades, carrots, celery, strawberries etc because of food intolerances that developed during my illness.  Others may have a different list of foods that cause them symptoms.

An elimination diet is a good way to find foods that cause symptoms.

A good way to do an elimination diet is to start with 5 whole foods and build slowly.  So eat only those 5 foods for a week and then add one new whole food.  After 3 days if there are no symptoms add another food.  This is a somewhat slow process but it is the often the only reliable way to identify food intolerances.  And then the old if it makes you sick don't eat it comes into play.  Our bodies are great at telling us what foods makes us sick if we learn to listen.  But with a standard processed foods diet a person may eat a hundred or more food ingredients in one day.  It can be very hard to guess a food culprit from that mess.  Also, it is very possible to have more than one food intolerance.  So eliminating most foods is needed and then adding back slowly.

Edited by GFinDC

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