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Vitamin E in Foods

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Is vitamin E that is added to foods safe? I notice that a lot of gluten free food products have vitamin E listed n in the ingredients (almond milk, for example). I’m still, even over a year into this, confused about tocopherols and their safety in foods and cosmetics.

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Fmbm,

Most fortified foods contain the Alpha form of Vitamin E.

It (E) and Vitamin A used to be recommended for Lung Cancers but when the Alpha form of E showed no benefit upon a follow up study Vitamin E has fallen out of favor.

Try a whole food source when possible.  Sunflower and Sesame seeds and raw Almonds are all good sources of Vitamin E.

Here is a good article on the benefits of Sesame seeds for Vitamin E.

http://inhumanexperiment.blogspot.com/2009/01/sesame-seeds-increase-absorption-of.html

If you take Vitamin E as mixed (all the tocohpherols) or a Gamma form you are more likely to benefit from taking Vitamin E.

Here is the National Institute of Health page on Vitamin E.

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-HealthProfessional/

Fbmb (be careful) Life extension magazine are trying to sell you their vitamins but they usually have good research.

If you want to read about why mixed (gamma and alpha) forms are better together then read this article.

http://www.lifeextension.com/Magazine/2011/1/Critical-Importance-of-Gamma-E-Tocopherol-Continues-to-Be-Overlooked/Page-01

luckily most food forms are naturally balanced .. . while fortified foods typically only has the alpha (synthetic forms) and that is because it is the form measured easiest in the blood though as I understand it gamma is the more potent form in the body.

I had a friend who swore by it (Vitamin E) in megadoses for his cholesterol but Vitamin E in the Alpha form at least didn't seem to help mine.

But I did find raw almonds (or just Almonds) and Sesame seeds helped.

Walnuts are also a source of Vitamin E and they are heart healthy too if you can  afford them.

****this is not medical advice but I hope this is helpful.

Posterboy,

 

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On 6/24/2018 at 9:48 AM, Fbmb said:

Is vitamin E that is added to foods safe? I notice that a lot of gluten free food products have vitamin E listed n in the ingredients (almond milk, for example). I’m still, even over a year into this, confused about tocopherols and their safety in foods and cosmetics.

Fbmb, 

To summarize your OP.  Cyclinglady has given you a good link.

For those who might not have time to read the whole link from the glutenfree dietitian.

"Alpha-tocopherol is added to foods, supplements, and personal care items as natural tocopherol and synthetic tocopherol. You can tell whether a food/supplement contains synthetic or natural vitamin E by reading the ingredient label. Synthetic vitamin E has a “dl” in front of the name, such as dl-alpha tocopherol. Natural forms of vitamin E have a “d” in front of them, such as d-alpha tocopherol, d-alpha tocopherol acid succinate, and d-alpha tocopherol acetate.

D-alpha tocopherol is derived from vegetable oil, most often soybean oil. D-alpha tocopherol also may be derived from other oils, including wheat germ oil. This has caused some members of the gluten-free community to be concerned that d-alpha tocopherol may contain gluten."

So depending on the source you might have some problems especially if soy also bothers you.  Most d-alpha's will be from Soy but the dl-form is the synthetic form of the Vitamin.

I have a friend who can't take liquidgels because most of them have soy lecithin in them.

I hope this is helpful.

Posterboy,

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