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Ennis_TX

Vitamin and Mineral Interactions

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One of my friends sent this to me, it covers most vitamin and mineral interactions, and can help some with finding what to supplement with what and why. Along with adverse interactions between some. Althought it misses some concepts we deal with among food and compound interactions, it still helps with insight.

https://www.deannaminich.com/vitamin-and-mineral-interactions-the-complex-relationship-of-essential-nutrients

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Posted (edited)

Ennis,

My intent is not to discredit your posting.   I know you have issues beyond celiac disease that affect your intestinal tract and supplementation has been helping you.  I have just been learning more about supplements.  Do we really need them?  

Vitamins are necessary for us to survive.  However, unless you have an illness (like celiac disease that is active), chances are you do not need to take vitamins if you eat a wide and varied diet.  Humans have managed to survive for thousands of years without them.  

If you suspect vitamin deficiencies, a good place to start might be to ask your doctor to run a blood panel.  Consider adding in more nutritional foods into your diet if you suspect a deficiency.  Of course, if you are not absorbing vitamins from food sources due to active illness, then consider supplements.  Make sure they are gluten free if you have celiac disease or NCGS.  Read more about this 37 billion dollar industry (sometimes it is all about the money.....😥😞

https://www.businessinsider.com/supplements-vitamins-bad-or-good-health-2017-8

That said, I want to share with you this funny video about vitamins, the history of vitamin supplements, and why most healthy people do not need to purchase supplements.  

 

Edited by cyclinglady
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This is a interaction chart....it shows which vitamins work together, this goes beyond supplementing...this goes with EATING whole foods. It tells you how some interact and can block absorption of others while some require to be taken together.

BTW with the SAD diet...you either have to eat enriched foods or supplement. Most Americans do not comprehend that the vitamins and minerals they need come from eating different whole foods and think it is fine to live off processed carbs and meat alone.

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You are absolutely correct.  The Standard American Diet is not healthy!  Many people probably do need to supplement, but it might be better, if we all just ate real food instead of processed, but this is not always possible.  It is a nice goal to work towards though.  

Maybe having celiac disease has been a blessing for me.  My family has eliminated many processed foods (not just gluten) and I think we feel better doing so.  I strongly believe that food can help heal!  

I am sorry that I hyjacked your thread! 

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Ennistx and Cyclinglady,

Ennis_Tx thank you for posting that link it was very helpful.

It explains well why it is hard to supplement properly/correctly.

because no Vitamin/Mineral exists in a "Vacuum".

Dr. Heaney explained this well in his series on Vitamins.

http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/06/25/some-rules-for-studies-evaluating-nutrient-effects/

he says quoting

"Finally, studies may be null because of failure to optimize co-nutrient status.  The importance of doing so can be illustrated by a few examples. It is well recognized that vitamin D is necessary for regulation of calcium absorption, but it is less well recognized that quantitative analysis of the relation makes clear that vitamin D follows the sigmoid curve of Figure 1, i.e., its effect on calcium absorption reaches a maximum. Above that point more vitamin D does not produce more absorption. It has further been shown that even maximal vitamin D status will not compensate for calcium intakes below a certain level, i.e., even maximal absorption of not very much ingested calcium will result in not very much absorbed calcium. Thus, when testing skeletal outcomes and evaluating the effect of either vitamin D or calcium, it is essential that intake of the nutrient not being directly tested be optimized. Otherwise the effect of the nutrient being tested may be missed.  But it doesn’t stop there.  Protein is as necessary for bone repair as is calcium, and without adequate dietary protein, increased dietary calcium will not lead to replacement of lost bone, a fact that may help explain why many trials of supplemental calcium failed to increase bone mass. Several of the B vitamins (e.g., folate, B6, B12) are intimately involved in a biochemical process called single carbon transfer, and to discern the full effects of one, studies must ensure that intakes of the other two are not so low as to limit the response to the one being tested."

and is probably is what is shown up in these many studies nullifying the power of vitamins to make and keep us heatlhy .... commonly seen in B-Vitamin supplementation.

because we know B-Vitamins helps Celiac's.

And his entire 4 part series on mainly why the Vitamin D RDA levels as Knitty Kitty advocates . . .higher is better.

I am providing the link for part three because I think it summarizes the series welll but read all the series on Vitamins when you get a chance.

http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/04/18/part-three-defining-normal/

He call's it living on the (healthy my words) Plateau.

I would quote from the article but I want/need this post to be shorter than many of my others due to time constraints .... so just read the Dr. Heaney series of articles on this topic when/if you get a chance... I think they explain it better than any other article I have read on the topic of Vitamins.

As always “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things”

2 Timothy 2: 7

Posterboy by the Grace of God,

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