Jump to content
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

mama.liz07

List of Brands: Certified gluten free with SHARED LINES

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

FYI!

 

Certified gluten free foods (tested below 10ppm) are often made on shared equipment. 
Also, foods labeled gluten free (tested below 20ppm) can also be made on shared equipment. 

Cumulatively, this could be too much gluten.
i.e. If you use too many brands that all contain trace amounts of gluten then you could accumulate too much gluten, even if the individual product amounts are below accepted levels.

Brands that use Shared Lines
(gluten foods made on the same equipment as gluten-free foods)

 

Alter eco chocolate
Amy’s
Arrowhead
Bird's Eye frozen veggies
Blakes shepherd pies
Bolthouse Farms
Breyers ice cream
Classico
Color kitchen cupcake colors
Conagra
Country life vitamins
Drews
Erewhon
From the ground up
Gin Gins
Grandy oats
Haagen-Dazs
Hellman's
Imagine Foods
Jeff's Natural Jalapeno stuffed olives
Kind
Kraft foods
Lance
Late july
Lotus Foods
Lovely Candy company
Nature's Bakery
Nature’s Path
Nestle
Organic Valley
Orrington farms broth
Outshine popcicles
Pacific Foods
Purdue/Harvestland Chicken
San-j
Simple Mills
Stubbs
Unilever
Vans
Wild Planet fish
Natural Sea Salmon
So-delicious

 

**NOTE**
This is not an exhaustive list. My information is only as good as the representative with whom I spoke.  This list is time sensitive.
However, I am FINALLY getting well after cutting out ALL brands that use shared lines! 


 

 

Edited by mama.liz07
Correction from another member.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, mama.liz07 said:

FYI!

 

Certified gluten free foods (tested below 10ppm) are often made on shared equipment. 
Also, foods labeled gluten free (tested below 20ppm) can also be made on shared equipment. 

Cumulatively, this could be too much gluten.
i.e. If you use 5 brands and each has between 5-15 ppm of gluten then you are over the safe limit.

 

 


 

That’s not how it works.  You don’t eat 3 foods and add the ppm.  Also, less than ten ppm could mean 0.  Parts  per million is easier to think of like a percentage- it’s ppm of the total food you eat at once.  if everything is under 20 ppm, it’s gluten-free.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's good to know.  But I sure have been getting sick on shared equipment foods.  When I looked at the regulations--how often they have to test, how large the sample is, etc, I think there could be parts of the food that are higher and parts that are okay.  And they don't have to test every batch.  But whatever is happening, my son and I finally getting well.  Trading out shared lines foods for dedicated gluten free line foods.  Same types of foods, just different brands.  Might be helpful to others too.  But I'm just a celiac mama with a celiac son, definitely not an expert.  Take my list with a grain of salt!  And thanks for the info!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@mama.liz07— 

I went grain free after I got my diabetes diagnosis (one year after my celiac disease diagnosis) to reduce carbs and I finally felt better.  What I realized that although my hubby could tolerate many processed gluten-free foods, I could not.  For example,  I have issues with Xanthan Gum.  While I am no longer lactose intolerant, I can not tolerate peppers or anything related to the garlic family.  While I healed from celiac disease, I still have issues with my other AI issues.  I think I am pretty sensitive and I have come to realize that 20 ppm might be okay for some celiacs but not others.  

We each need to find our own way.  For example, I use Stubbs for chili (it is certified gluten-free), I can not eat it.  I feed it to hubby and my kid.  It is gluten free, but the peppers and onions  make me ill.  

I avoid all processed oats (for hubby) because I can not be assured the oats are pure or mechanically sorted (General Mills made a huge investment and they need to sell bulk oats to all the little gluten-free food companies to offset that investment in my opinion).  

The gluten free Watchdog has tested most processed foods labeled gluten-free (e.g. Classico pasta sauce) and some not labeled gluten-free.    She found that the vast majority of manufacturers comply with FDA regulations.  I encourage you to subscribe.  She is like a mini Consumer Reports for gluten-free.  

Processed food is really junk — gluten free or not.  

I am glad you and your son are getting better! 

Edited by cyclinglady

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cyclinglady said:

@mama.liz07— 

I went grain free after I got my diabetes diagnosis (one year after my celiac disease diagnosis) to reduce carbs and I finally felt better.  What I realized that although my hubby could tolerate many processed gluten-free foods, I could not.  For example,  I have issues with Xanthan Gum.  While I am no longer lactose intolerant, I can not tolerate peppers or anything related to the garlic family.  While I healed from celiac disease, I still have issues with my other AI issues.  I think I am pretty sensitive and I have come to realize that 20 ppm might be okay for some celiacs but not others.  

We each need to find our own way.  For example, I use Stubbs for chili (it is certified gluten-free), I can not eat it.  I feed it to hubby and my kid.  It is gluten free, but the peppers and onions  make me ill.  

I avoid all processed oats (for hubby) because I can not be assured the oats are pure or mechanically sorted (General Mills made a huge investment and they need to sell bulk oats to all the little gluten-free food companies to offset that investment in my opinion).  

The gluten free Watchdog has tested most processed foods labeled gluten-free (e.g. Classico pasta sauce) and some not labeled gluten-free.    She found that the vast majority of manufacturers comply with FDA regulations.  I encourage you to subscribe.  She is like a mini Consumer Reports for gluten-free.  

Processed food is really junk — gluten free or not.  

I am glad you and your son are getting better! 

Thanks for sharing!  I'm glad you've figured out what works for you too!  And I agree--I think most companies do a good job following the guidelines of the FDA, certification groups, etc.  I just didn't realize until recently how many of my products--even healthy ones like butter, chicken, frozen veggies, canned fruit, etc...are processed on shared lines. Trace amounts just seem to be too much for me, even if they are at accepted levels.  Gonna try the gluten-free facilities for a while...seems to be helping!!  🙂 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/16/2019 at 2:41 PM, kareng said:

That’s not how it works.  You don’t eat 3 foods and add the ppm.  Also, less than ten ppm could mean 0.  Parts  per million is easier to think of like a percentage- it’s ppm of the total food you eat at once.  if everything is under 20 ppm, it’s gluten-free.  

 

Everything I have read is that getting to the point of triggering an autoimmune response IS CUMULATIVE.  So 1 bit here, 1  there, 1 bit after, it adds up and then bam you have a reaction.  And some may react on less than others.  Moderators or those more experienced, please chime in.  Oh heck, I just did an internet search, and yes, it is cumulative.

On 5/16/2019 at 2:41 PM, kareng said:

That’s not how it works.  You don’t eat 3 foods and add the ppm.  Also, less than ten ppm could mean 0.  Parts  per million is easier to think of like a percentage- it’s ppm of the total food you eat at once.  if everything is under 20 ppm, it’s gluten-free.  

 

Everything I have read is that getting to the point of triggering an autoimmune response IS CUMULATIVE.  So 1 bit here, 1  there, 1 bit after, it adds up and then bam you have a reaction.  And some may react on less than others.  Moderators or those more experienced, please chime in.  Oh heck, I just did an internet search, and yes, it is cumulative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Beverage said:

Everything I have read is that getting to the point of triggering an autoimmune response IS CUMULATIVE.  So 1 bit here, 1  there, 1 bit after, it adds up and then bam you have a reaction.  And some may react on less than others.  Moderators or those more experienced, please chime in.  Oh heck, I just did an internet search, and yes, it is cumulative.

Everything I have read is that getting to the point of triggering an autoimmune response IS CUMULATIVE.  So 1 bit here, 1  there, 1 bit after, it adds up and then bam you have a reaction.  And some may react on less than others.  Moderators or those more experienced, please chime in.  Oh heck, I just did an internet search, and yes, it is cumulative.

That wasn't how experts have explained it to me/in seminars.  Please post your internet search.  Perhaps we are not talking about it in the same terms?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Beverage I think with some people very tiny amounts even once can trigger a severe reaction, and with other people like myself it would take small contamination over time to add up and cause noticeable issues. Keep in mind however, just because small amounts of contamination may not trigger noticeable symptoms in some celiacs it does not mean that damage isn’t being done, or that there aren’t risks. Many celiacs have no obvious symptoms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you. All very good points. That's me, no intestinal symptoms but after a few weeks of unknowingly consuming gluten, I finally feel like I've been hit by a truck. We're all different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Understanding Less Than 20 Parts Per Million (PPM)

It is a common misconception that foods labeled "gluten-free" can or do contain zero parts per million (ppm) of gluten. At this time, no validated tests are able to accurately detect gluten at zero. Less than 20 ppm is an amount that has been deemed safe by celiac disease experts for MOST people living with the genetic autoimmune disease.

In 2011, Beyond Celiac Scientific/Medical Advisory Council Member Dr. Alessio Fasano of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital (formerly at the University of Maryland), wrote a letter called "In Defense of 20 Parts Per Million." In this letter, Dr. Fasano explains why this amount has been deemed safe for most people with celiac disease.” 

https://www.beyondceliac.org/gluten-free-diet/food-labeling-laws/

https://www.beyondceliac.org/SiteData/docs/InDefenseo/7a4890bd693bc562/In Defense of 20 ppm_Alessio Fasano Letter.pdf

https://celiac.org/about-the-foundation/featured-news/2014/08/fda-gluten-free-food-labeling-information-page/

Some people who have celiac disease may be more sensitive than others and 20 ppm might be too much for them.  We each have to determine our individual thresholds based on our needs.  There is no “one size fits all” gluten-free diet as we also tend to have individualized intolerances or other illnesses.  

This from the EU disputes that 20 ppm may be too much.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4766553/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Whitepaw said:

When I was first diagnosed,  my Dr. said same line foods were not OK. 

Mine did too and because of that, I just assumed certified foods would NOT be produced on shared lines.  I was very surprised to learn otherwise.

And for foods that say "gluten free" but aren't certified, when I called and asked about cross contamination, the companies often said, "there is no chance of cross contamination."  I assumed that meant dedicated lines.  I now understand that "no chance" often means they wash thoroughly and test.  (you have to get very specific with the way you ask your questions).  I'm sure shared lines (especially when certified) are fine for some people with celiac, but not for others.  I guess my son and I just happen to be the hypersensitive type. We are doing much much better only using products made on dedicated lines!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

“Understanding Less Than 20 Parts Per Million (PPM)

It is a common misconception that foods labeled "gluten-free" can or do contain zero parts per million (ppm) of gluten. At this time, no validated tests are able to accurately detect gluten at zero. Less than 20 ppm is an amount that has been deemed safe by celiac disease experts for MOST people living with the genetic autoimmune disease.

In 2011, Beyond Celiac Scientific/Medical Advisory Council Member Dr. Alessio Fasano of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital (formerly at the University of Maryland), wrote a letter called "In Defense of 20 Parts Per Million." In this letter, Dr. Fasano explains why this amount has been deemed safe for most people with celiac disease.” 

https://www.beyondceliac.org/gluten-free-diet/food-labeling-laws/

https://www.beyondceliac.org/SiteData/docs/InDefenseo/7a4890bd693bc562/In Defense of 20 ppm_Alessio Fasano Letter.pdf

https://celiac.org/about-the-foundation/featured-news/2014/08/fda-gluten-free-food-labeling-information-page/

Some people who have celiac disease may be more sensitive than others and 20 ppm might be too much for them.  We each have to determine our individual thresholds based on our needs.  There is no “one size fits all” gluten-free diet as we also tend to have individualized intolerances or other illnesses.  

This from the EU disputes that 20 ppm may be too much.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4766553/

I checked out this last article and then linked from there to a study done by the FDA.  I thought this was interesting. 

"In sum, these findings indicate that a less than 1 ppm level of gluten in foods is the level of exposure for individuals with celiac disease on a GFD that protects the most sensitive individuals with celiac disease and thus, also protects the most number of individuals with celiac disease from experiencing any detrimental health effects from extended to long-term exposure to gluten."
https://www.fda.gov/media/81500/download

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!  That was a long report.  

Since my celiac disease diagnosis and becoming a member of celiac.com, I have realized that we are all unique.  How we react to gluten varies in terms of symptoms and the amount of gluten we can safely consume before setting off an autoimmune reaction.  The 20 ppm cut off set by celiac researchers was a start.  Perhaps, newer testing methods in the future may allow manufacturers to eventually get to zero ppm.  

My hubby was gluten free some 12 years before my diagnosis.  He went gluten free based on the advice of my allergist and his GP.  The diet worked.  He refuses to do a challenge and I can not blame him.  Back then, there was pretty much nothing processed that was gluten free except at health food stores and it was awful.   Instead, we chose foods that were naturally gluten free and minimally processed.  He thrived.  After my diagnosis, The switch to gluten-free was easy. I knew the drill.  A year after my diagnosis, I started having blood sugar issues.  So, I went on a low carb diet (basically ate to my meter).  By doing so, I gave up all grains (they spike my blood sugar).  Amazingly, I finally felt better.   Was it avoiding grains, less junk, or managing my diabetes?  Who knows? 

When I get an exposure to gluten, I get deathly ill.  Which is weird because at the time of my diagnosis, I was only anemic.   Days of vomiting, pain, diarrhea, bloating, and passing out occurs.  Then continued weeks of trying to digest anything.  The last time I triggered a bout of autoimmune hives for six months.  I was mess. 

I am so careful now.  Super strict.  I tend to follow the advice of DH sufferers.  I can not imagine having DH!  Being careful has paid off.  My small intestine has healed based on repeat biopsies.  My hubby is often not strict.  Oh, he never cheats, but he will consume gluten-free processed foods and eat at some not dedicated restaurants that I will not take a chance on.  Nothing is worth the risk of becoming so ill for me. He only gets ill for a week.    I have been glutened only at restaurants (vacations) and possibly through one medication that might not have been gluten free. (Funny how food manufacturers  must follow the FDA requirements, but not pharmaceutical companies. Call your representative today and get that bill passed this year!)  I am super careful about taking risks.  

Do what works for you and your family.  The goal is to heal and live a healthy life.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • May 29, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • June 01, 2019 Until June 02, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
    • July 07, 2019 Until August 03, 2019
      0  
      For more information, visit www.kefss.com or call (407) 255-6550. info@kefss.com 

      KEF USA Summer Camps Announces the New KEF Gluten-Free Camp in Orlando, Florida for Youths with Celiac Disease.

      [Orlando, FL February 6, 2019]-KEF USA is excited to announce that we will offer a new 100% gluten-free camp program to give kids and teens with Celiac Disease a safe, exciting and healthy summer. KEF USA programs offer fun and unique experiences that can only be found in Orlando, Florida. Campers explore the theme parks and local attractions, make new friends, discover new interests and create memories that last a lifetime.


×
×
  • Create New...