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Well they won't guarantee because of cross contamination. I don't trust ANY of the Quaker products.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

that's what i thought. i called Quaker in January, and they said none of their products could be considered gluten-free. I was just wondering if there was a new policy.... Darn. Thanks.

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Glad to have helped, NegativeZero.  :D

I don't make a lot of things from scratch so I don't really know about flours....buckwheat is fine, despite its name, brown rice flour (or any other rice flour), tapioca flour, potato starch........somebody else might be able to help there.

-celiac3270

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You might also try sweet rice flour (hard to find sometimes) and Teff. Claire

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You might also try sweet rice flour (hard to find sometimes) and Teff.  Claire

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

We can also eat bean flour. There's a brand that I bought in my nearby Price Chopper that was a gluten-free all-purpose flour. It worked well for chocolate chip coconut cookies, but when I made sugar cookies with it I thought it tasted like raw lentils. I'd use it again but only for baked stuff with other stronger flavors.

The gluten-free pantry has a ton of good mixes. I like bother the french bread (also doubles as pizza crust) and the sandwich bread are good. I've found that the texture is better when I don't use my bread machine and when I warm it up a bit before eating it. If you eat it cold it can be crumbly like corn bread. I don't recommend the muffins though. I made blueberry muffins from the muffin and scone mix and they were alright at first but after they cooled they tasted like saw dust and toasting or microwaving didn't help at all.

These breads also freeze really well and cost about 3-4 dollars a bag for the mix. The loaf is huge so I always freeze 1/2.

I find that my motivation for being gluten-free especially when I'm in a relationship is the lack of gas. There's nothing more embarassing than accidentally passing gas and clearing the room!

Stephie

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The fact that you're making gluten-free brownies for your girlfriend scores HUGE points with me! Maybe I can shed some light on why your girlfriend is doing what she's doing, because I'm doing the same thing.

I don't have Celiac, but I have been diagnosed with Gluten Ataxia. Basically, the antibodies to gluten, combined with some other antibodies, are destroying the cerebellum of my brain. I'm now in a wheelchair when I'm out, and either using a walker or using the walls and doorways to keep upright at home (I walk like a drunk, essentially). After finally accepting that, O.K., maybe the doctors are right, now I'm just MAD that it feels like my ENTIRE LIFE is turned upside down. Not only can I not do the things I used to, but now I can't even EAT THE THINGS THAT I LIKE!!!!!!! It's a stupid kind of childlike rebellion, is deleterious to my health, and the most bizarre thing is that I know I'm doing it. And not that I'm old, but I'm not necessarily a kid, either!

I have to believe that this is just a phase. I'm picking up the book more and more, label shopping much more, and kind of "easing into" the Gluten-Free lifestyle. I think because I know that the change is permanent and should ultimately never be reversed, it's really difficult to accept. When you look at the components of foods which could possibly contain gluten, you begin to realize that this lifestyle change is BIG. Being a part of a very close-knit family, it also means that my children, my parents, my sister and her family, etc. will also be affected by this -- it sort of makes me feel like the family freak. We can't have (this) because it has gluten. We can't have (that) because it has gluten. It feels as though, to attend a family gathering, we're all going to have to learn how to cook gluten-free, or else I'm going to have to bring my meals to everything!

Give your girlfriend some time -- my husband is doing the same for me. Each time I ask him to bring home a Pizza, his question is "Are you SURE?" If I say "yes" -- there's no further discussion, lecture, etc. If I say "No" or "Not really, but I don't know what else to do", he helps me decide on a better choice. I find it hard to believe that if you're baking Gluten Free brownies for her, she won't be coming around REALLY soon! Good luck, and thanks for listening to me vent, as well!

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Glad to have helped, NegativeZero.  :D

I was told that Pamela's Products Ultra Chocolate Brownie Mix are MUCH better than food by george brownies and are absolutely to die for.

-celiac3270

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Just a vote for Pamela's goodies. Everything I have tried so far has been really good - especially Pecan Sandies. They come plain or with chocolate chips. Claire

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The fact that you're making gluten-free brownies for your girlfriend scores HUGE points with me!  Maybe I can shed some light on why your girlfriend is doing what she's doing, because I'm doing the same thing.

I don't have Celiac, but I have been diagnosed with Gluten Ataxia.  Basically, the antibodies to gluten, combined with some other antibodies, are destroying the cerebellum of my brain.

Give your girlfriend some time -- my husband is doing the same for me.  Each time I ask him to bring home a Pizza, his question is "Are you SURE?"  If I say "yes" -- there's no further discussion, lecture, etc.  If I say "No" or "Not really, but I don't know what else to do", he helps me decide on a better choice.  I find it hard to believe that if you're baking Gluten Free brownies for her, she won't be coming around REALLY soon!  Good luck, and thanks for listening to me vent, as well!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi again tiredofdoctors - you and I know that you know better than pizza! Every grain of gluten is hurting you. Don't do it. It's hard. I know. I am there too. I just don't want to get worse or at least worse any faster than I have to. For that I will pay a price. Not happily but I will pay it. If the person closest to you is supportive and kind, you have it made. I live with my daughter who is just wonderful about this and I consider myself fortunate. When she is doing so much to support me, I cannot cheat - not fair to her - or me. I have posted a wonderful rice pizza recipe. Do a search here for it. If you don't find it just tell me and I will post it for you. It's great.

Claire

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Which newsletter? All the ones I've eaten are gluten free, have no gluten in the ingredients, and say gluten free on the label. I've also never reacted to any of those I've eaten, and I'm a pretty sensitive reactor.

Curious...

Stephanie

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Another curious. Pamela's are labeled gluten free, no gluten containing ingredients on the label and sold in the Gluten Free section of my Health Store - likewise at Whole Foods. Is someone making the buckwheat mistake here? Claire

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Thanks, Claire! It's true, having loving, supportive people around you is probably the most important part of all this. Last night, my husband went out to get ice cream for us -- checking the labels so that I can have each kind -- because we only had Gluten-containing junk food here!

Touche' with regard to the pizza! I really do think that I have a rebellion thing going on here, though -- I had never thought about the fact that I am also hurting my husband, kids and the rest of my family each time I eat gluten-containing foods. Hmmmmm . . . . different perspective, and a REAL eye-opener. Thanks for the wake-up call.

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Guest BERNESES

All I have to say, reading these threads, is that you guys are wonderful to be so concerned! My husband is the same way and it makes a world of difference! B

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I am 28 and was just diagnosed a week ago. I live with my fiancee and he has been wonderful. Together we threw out all the non-gluten-free foods in our house and he is great about making and eating all gluten-free foods at home with me. I appreciate it tons. But i do think there is a time of mourning for sure. I just met with my dietician and she said that was completely normal. The whole thing is a bit daunting and overwhelming. its a lifestyle change and that is scary to think about. I thought to myself "I like my life and i dont want to change it." Of course i had celiac symptoms for only a couple of weeks so perhaps i wasnt as ready to make a change as others were. I think what bothered me most is the symptoms and problems that tend to come with celiac down the road - all the other issues. and also, the eating out issue. My fiancee and i are young and live in the city and we like to go out and try new restaurants with each other and friends. we go to hole-in-the-wall bars and drink beer and eat fried foods. Eating is definitely a social activity in the US. and its just not that much fun to go to a restaurant and order plain chicken and steamed veggies. you know? I think I am mourning the social burden it puts on me more than anything. That may sound absurd, but thats what i am struggling with.

I think it is so important to have people who are supportive. Its only been a week and i dont know how i would have made it even this far without those people. But at the same time - I need time to adjust you know? I think your girlfriend will come around and start sticking to the diet, i am beginning to stick to it as well. it just takes a little time. Its really hard to say "okay - change your life completely - starting right now!!!" It will happen and it will get easier. Way to be so supportive!! i am impressed, and i am sure that even though she might not be saying so right now, i bet your girlfriend appreciates your efforts more than you know.

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I just finished reading "Dangerous Grains" which is an excellent book. I have been gluten-free for over a year, but I still found it very informative. Something I didn't know before what that gluten has mild opiate qualities, and health problems of recovering drug addicts and newly gluten-free celiacs are very similar. Basically, your body is still longing for something very dangerous, much like any opiate drug addiction.

Don't be surprised if you have very powerful cravings--just know what body is doing, and don't give in! It's the only way to break the cycle. Stay strong! Your body recovers, and you personally will move on from your grieving period. Life is so much better gluten free! My only regret is that I didn't know about this my entire life.

No cheating!

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The last three days I was so busy that I cheated. My husband wanted to eat out, so I decided we could. Oh my...it's not worth it ! I'm so disappointed in myself. :ph34r:

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The last three days I was so busy that I cheated.  My husband wanted to eat out, so I decided we could. Oh my...it's not worth it !  I'm so disappointed in myself.  :ph34r:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What's done is done. It's just time to pick up where you left off and go back to being gluten-free. Use this experience to determine how you might have been able to eat gluten free at the restaurant, so you can next time. (For instance, when a bunch of coworkers were leaving, and we had 20-person tables at Claim Jumper, I just asked for a plain baked potato and plain, steam vegetables. Maybe I could have gotten a grilled steak in that environment if I had enough time to talk with the waiter, but didn't feel like doing it in that sort of setting. But it did provide for gluten-free food for me.)

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Guest BERNESES
My fiancee and i are young and live in the city and we like to go out and try new restaurants with each other and friends. we go to hole-in-the-wall bars and drink beer and eat fried foods. Eating is definitely a social activity in the US. and its just not that much fun to go to a restaurant and order plain chicken and steamed veggies. you know? I think I am mourning the social burden it puts on me more than anything. That may sound absurd, but thats what i am struggling with.

I think that's so true- eating and drinking in the US is really social and it's hard when you have to be the "different" one. I have been gluten-free since February (almost 10 months now) and there are plenty of times when I've wanted to scream.

I think you also made a good point- if you've only been having symptoms for awhile or no symptoms at all, it's even harder to be like "OK I have to change my entire diet today! For the rest of my life" I think it would make you more prone to "cheating" (I hate to call it that) because you don't feel the consequences as strongly.

When I went gluten-free I had been miserably sick and exhausted for about 6 months and had lost twenty pounds so I knew something was REALLY wrong. For me, it was easy because I was willing to do almost anything to feel better (still am). But as time went on and things really "sunk in" it became harder. I go through periods of time when I am really frustrated (this will be my first gluten-free Thanksgiving). I am also frustrated because I am not healing as quickly as I thought I would, but that's another story.

We all need time to be angry and grieve. Hang in there, Beverly

PS I miss beer and French fries too!

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I have read this thread from start to finish and I have to add my memories now. I was sick for so long--diarrhea nearly every night, sometimes all night long. I couldnt plan anything, I was raising 5 kids pretty much alone--running them all over, hoping to not be sick when they needed me most. When I went gluten free, it was a relief. I didnt mourn the food I couldnt have, I never even thought about eating something we cant touch. I was so happy to be feeling better and having the weight melting away (I am one of the celiacs that gained while sick instead of losing). I could go places, I wasnt sick all the time--I was enjoying life, something I had not done for a very long time. It has been over 4 years now--NOW, I miss those foods. I was in a grocery store last weekend and they had fresh fried chicken out--it smelled so good--I was like a puppy following my nose to the deli section. I looked at it with love on my face. I wanted that chicken so much, and truthfully, I was never much of a fried chicken fan. Noodles with Cream of Chicken Soup is something I want, a Milky Way candy bar--real chocolate chip cookies--my mother's lasagna----by the way, I have had to give up most soy and corn too along with all tomato products, fresh and processed. I feel sometimes like I want to scream, "WHY ME??????????" Honest, I am thankful it is a disease we can live with, as long as we stick to the lifestyle laid out for us. I was sick for so long that I now have neuropathy too and that has been taking over some of my happy zone. I watch my kids and know that they too are showing signs of gluten sensitivity and they dont want to deal with it, I cant convince them to be checked. I dont relay my feelings to them, I live 800 miles away and it has only been the last few months that I have been feeling like something is missing. I am good most of the time, just my mind wanders sometimes to what we are missing. I will always be gluten-free, I never, ever have eaten something containing gluten knowingly and I never will. Sometimes, it is an emotional roller coaster, just as any disease causes. Deb

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When looking for flours, don't forget the nut flours. I especially like them for sweet baked goods. Coffee cakes and muffins, things like that just seem to beg for almond or pecan flours. Also walnut, hazelnut, etc. Nuts add a bit of protein as well so I like to use them whenever possible. Also, I've seen pumpkin flour for sale. Haven't tried it, but I bet it would make the best pumpkin bread!

Debbie

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:) You're doing the right thing.

I sympathise but am at the same time encouraged by you're commitment to helping her and understanding what she's going through. Kudos!

Hello all! I just joined today.

My girlfried was diagnosed last week and we've had some stressful times since then. I have been reading furiously and reading labels and surfing the net. I bought a gluten-free cookbook and printed out a lot of recipes on-line. I just got back from the health food store and bought a bunch of gluten-free foods for her.

My only grumble is (and I am just posting to vent/sympathize )...she has done nothing about it yet. She *is* reading labels and really just eating fruit right now...but mostly she is complaining about getting screwed with this disease. Not that I blame her. I would be displeased to say the least. And I am trying to be supportive but it would be a lot easier if she could pitch in and help with this huge lifestyle adjustment we are making. I am not gluten-free except when we are together, but she doesn't even know half the things she needs to know nor does it seem like the term "trace-amounts" is sinking in. I hope this is just an initial shock phase and she comes around to understand the severity of her disease...I mean god, she has been so sick for so long and now when we can finally "fix" it, she has crawled into an irritable depression. I can only assume she will feel a lot better when I get all the gluten out of her. :)

Ok I feel better now...time to make gluten-free brownies for TV nite tomorrow. :)

Take care everyone!

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celiac3270 - i'm confused because you said you can have chips, but specifically not doritos - then you posted a list which included every variety of doritos as okay. i have checked the bag before and they're fine.

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Kari, Nacho Cheese Doritos or *I think* any Cheese flavoured Doritos are NOT gluten-free in Canada. Not sure about the States.

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My sympathies, it's a big change. But it's not the end of the world. There are more and more products available to choose from, and the quality and variety has greatly improved even in just the last five years. Travel is the hardest, as is eating out, but it's all dooable with research - my partner and I went to Italy and got through. It is a change for both of you, and sounds like you are ready to dive in whereas she's coming to terms with what this means to her. She may need to adjust gradually, and try things. A lot of the bread is good (Kinkinnick is the best I hear), but flaky croissants are out (though we found chocolate croissants in Italy, they weren't very good). Whole Foods has good stuff as well.

I have to say: I have gotten serious brownie points with my partner, especially early on in our relationship, by ordering her gluten free products on the web. I got her her first ever oreo like cookies and pretzels. I have made her homemade sugar cookies and cooked her her first gluten free lasagne. I really won big when she came home one day and found a big box on the porch, full of gluten free beer. She had never dreamed that there was such a thing.

There are a lot of resources out there, support groups, web sites to order food, cookbooks. It's a culinary adventure.

Best of luck to you.

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